Your Road to Wellness

General Health

What can you do to help your immune system to better protect yourself from pathogens like viruses?

Posted by on 9:52 am Anti-aging, General Health, General Health, Health, Supplements, Wellness | 0 comments

We are exposed to pathogens–especially viruses–all the time and our immune system is very effective at protecting us.  This means that most of the time, we don’t get sick.

Research has, however, found evidence of decreased levels of glutathione in several diseases–such as cancer, viral infections and immune dysfunction–as well as in aging (Fraternale A, et.al., 2006, Fraternale A, et. al., 2017).

Intra-cellular glutathione levels influence the Th1/Th2 immune response and the effectiveness of the immune system.

The body makes glutathione, which is involved in many cellular functions such as detoxification, amino acid transport, production of coenzymes, and the recycling of vitamins E and C.

Glutathione has also been found to inhibit viral replication (Fraternale, et.al., 2006).

It’s no doubt that glutathione is very important, and as long as your body is able to make what’s necessary to protect you, everything is fine.

The problem, however, is that the body is not able to provide adequate amounts of glutathione as we get older. The decrease is gradual.  Additionally, the rate of decrease depends on our exposure to pathogens, toxins, and oxidative stressors that require the protection of glutathione.  

You would not usually need to supplement with glutathione in your twenties, but as you get into your forties, the need for supplementation will increase.

Reduced glutathione–which is the most common form on the market–is not very effective since it is oxidized in your stomach and very little is absorbed.

S-Acetyl Glutathione a patented substance is however very effective and gets into the cells where it is needed (Cacciatore I, et.al., 2010).

Researchers have proposed molecules able to increase glutathione levels as new tools to more effectively hinder different pathogens by acting as both immunomodulators and antimicrobials.

References

Cacciatore I1, Cornacchia C, Pinnen F, Mollica A, Di Stefano A. Prodrug approach for increasing cellular glutathione levelsMolecules. 2010 Mar 3;15(3):1242-64.

Fraternale A, Paoletti MF, Casabianca A, Oiry J, Clayette P, Vogel JU, Cinatl J Jr, Palamara AT, Sgarbanti R, Garaci E, Millo E, Benatti U, Magnani M. Antiviral and immunomodulatory properties of new pro-glutathione (GSH) molecules. Curr Med Chem. 2006;13(15):1749-55.

Fraternale A, Brundu S, Magnani M. Glutathione and glutathione derivatives in immunotherapy. Biol Chem. 2017 Feb 1;398(2):261-275.

 

 

Glutathione helps your cells reduce free radical damage and also helps lower inflammation.

BioPro, Inc. Tissue Recovery is using the patented form of S-Acetyl Glutathione from the Italian company that has the patent for S-Acetyl Glutathione.

Click here to get your bottle of the most effective form of glutathione!

Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

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Does milk help prevent fractures?

Posted by on 9:28 am Anti-aging, Bone density, bone loss, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Milk is by most people believed to help support bone formation and reduce the risk for fractures, but is that true?

The following research investigated milk intake and the risk of mortality and fractures in women and men (Michaelsson K, et.al., 2014).

This study was done in Sweden and included 61,433 women and 45,339 men. The average follow up for the women was 20.1 year and for the men 11.2 years.

High milk intake was associated with higher mortality for both women and men, and with a higher fracture

incidence in women.

It’s common to recommend milk for teenagers to promote increased bone mass.

To determine whether milk consumption during teenage years influences the risk of hip fracture in older adults, the researchers of this study included both women and men and did 22 years of follow-up (Feskanich D, et.al., 2014).

After controlling for known risk factors and current milk consumption, each additional glass of milk per day during teenage years was associated with a significant 9% higher risk of hip fracture in men.

It was concluded that greater milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults.

These studies were population studies using food frequency questionnaires which is not as accurate as double blinded research comparing 2 groups.

However, when the research includes large population groups and both show the same results, it’s worthwhile to pay attention to the results.

References

Michaëlsson K, Wolk A, Langenskiöld S, Basu S, Warensjö Lemming E, Melhus H, Byberg L. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies.BMJ. 2014 Oct 28;349:g6015.

Feskanich D, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Frazier AL, Willett WC. Milk consumption during teenage years and risk of hip fractures in older adults. JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Jan;168(1):54-60.

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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Your blood glucose level affects the health of your blood vessels.

Posted by on 9:49 am Bloodsugar, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Glucose, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

Everybody agrees that to be able to function well and live a long life, we need good blood circulation. This necessitates a healthy vascular system.

Your vascular system is especially important for your heart, brain, and the rest of your body because the blood delivers nutrients and oxygen. Without a supply of nutrients, the tissue will degenerate. So what can you do to keep your vascular system healthy?

Books can be written on that topic, but here is a simple strategy you can implement that can make a big difference.

First, since most of us eat several meals daily and the after effect of a meal can have a pronounced effect on your blood vessels, think about how the meal will affect your blood glucose level.

The reason you should be concerned with this is that high glucose levels after a meal and insulin resistance cause damage to the endothelium–the inner layer of the blood vessel wall (Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM, 2017).

Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by decreased release of nitric oxide, increased oxidative stress, increased production of inflammatory factors, and impaired endothelial repair.

This is one of the reasons you can end up with atherosclerosis and reduced blood circulation.

Since one of the reasons for endothelial function can be that the blood glucose level after a meal is too high, many are now recommending low carbohydrate meals. This is done as an attempt to lower the blood glucose.

This, however, may not be the the best strategy.

Research to date suggests that diets that are low in carbohydrates may negatively impact vascular endothelial function (Jovanovski E, et.al., 2015).

It appears that it is more favourable to maintain the carbohydrate intake and instead use low glycemic index foods. This generates more benefits for the vascular system.

An easy way to do that is to add some beans or lentils to the meal and reduce the amount of a higher glycemic index item.

References

Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM.Macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes.J Diabetes. 2017 May;9(5):434-449.

Jovanovski E, Zurbau A, Vuksan V, Carbohydrates and endothelial function: is a low-carbohydrate diet or a low-glycemic index diet favourable for vascular health?Clin Nutr Res. 2015 Apr;4(2):69-75.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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What factors are playing a role in Alzheimer’s, cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease?

Posted by on 9:58 pm Alzheimer’s, Eating, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Heart disease, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (Gamba P, et.al., 2015).

Levels of  oxysterols derived from cholesterol oxidation and inflammatory mediators have been found to be increased in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients (Testa G, et.al., 2016).

Oxysterols, the major component of oxidized LDL is responsible for the increase in endothelial stiffness and is a key step in atherosclerosis development (Shentu TP, et.al., 2012).

When 70 people with mild cognitive impairment were compared with 140 normal individuals, oxysterol levels were significantly higher in the people with mild cognitive impairment (Liu Q, et.al., 2016).

Where do we find oxidized cholesterol?

Oxidized cholesterol are commonly found in foods with high cholesterol content, such as meat, egg yolk and full fatdairy products (Savage GP, et.al., 2002).

Factors known to increase the production of free radicals and therefore oxidized cholesterol in foods are heat, light, radiation, oxygen, moisture and the storage of food at room temperature.

Processes, such as pre-cooking, freeze-drying, dehydration and irradiation, have all been reported to result in increased production of oxidized cholesterol in meats.

What can you do to reduce oxidized cholesterol?

The most obvious way to do it is to avoid the foods that contain the oxidized cholesterol.

The best way to do that is to eat plant based foods, since animal source protein is where you find oxidized cholesterol.

It would also be beneficial to take S-Acetyl Gutathione and Curcumin to reduce free radical damage and inflammation further.

References

Gamba P, Testa G, Gargiulo S, Staurenghi E, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G.Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Front Aging Neurosci. 2015 Jun 19;7:119.

Liu Q, An Y, Yu H, Lu Y, Feng L, Wang C, Xiao R.Relationship between oxysterols and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: a case-control study.Lipids Health Dis. 2016 Oct 10;15(1):177.

Savage GP1, Dutta PC, Rodriguez-Estrada MT, Cholesterol oxides: their occurrence and methods to prevent their generation in foods. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(1):72-8

Shentu TP, Singh DK, Oh MJ, Sun S, Sadaat L, Makino A, Mazzone T, Subbaiah PV, Cho M, Levitan I.The role of oxysterols in control of endothelial stiffness.J Lipid Res. 2012 Jul;53(7):1348-58.

Testa G, Staurenghi E, Zerbinati C, Gargiulo S, Iuliano L, Giaccone G, Fantò F, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G, Gamba P.Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer’s disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation.Redox Biol. 2016 Dec;10:24-33.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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Glutathione helps your cells reduce free radical damage and also helps lower inflammation.

BioPro, Inc. Tissue Recovery is using the patented form of S-Acetyl Glutathione from the Italian company that has the patent for S-Acetyl Glutathione.

Click here to get your bottle of the most effective form of glutathione!

How meal times and light exposure affects cancer risk

Posted by on 6:08 am cancer risk, Eating, General Health | 0 comments

 

When the timing of meals was assessed to see if it affected the risk for breast and prostate cancer, something interesting was found.

The research was carried out between 2008 and 2013 in Spain (Kogevinas M, et.al., 2018). Included in the study was 621 cases of prostate cancer and 1205 cases of breast cancer compared with controls.

When participants sleeping immediately after dinner were compared to those sleeping 2 or more hours after dinner, the ones waiting 2 or more hours after dinner before they went to sleep had a 20% reduction in cancer risk for breast and prostate cancer combined.

A similar protection was observed in subjects having dinner before 9 pm compared with those having dinner after 10 pm. Not only does the food we eat affect cancer risk, but how late we eat and how long we wait before we go to bed after the last meal are all factors associated with cancer risk.

How does light exposer during the night affect cancer risk? Exposure to outdoor light in the blue spectrum during the night was associated with breast cancer when comparing the highest versus the lowest tertile (Garcia-Saenz A, et.al., 2018).

Men who slept in “quite illuminated” bedrooms had a higher risk of prostate cancer than men who slept in total darkness.

These are factors most of us can easily control.

References

Kogevinas M, Espinosa A, Castelló A, Gómez-Acebo I, Guevara M, Martin V, Amiano P, Alguacil J, Peiro R, Moreno V, Costas L, Fernández-Tardón G, Jimenez JJ, Marcos-Gragera R, Perez-Gomez B, Llorca J, Moreno-Iribas C, Fernández-Villa T, Oribe M, Aragones N, Papantoniou K, Pollán M4, Castano-Vinyals G, Romaguera
D. Effect of mistimed eating patterns on breast and prostate cancer risk (MCCSpain Study). Int J Cancer. 2018 Jul 17.

Garcia-Saenz A, Sánchez de Miguel A, Espinosa A, Valentin A, Aragonés N, Llorca J, Amiano P, Martín Sánchez V, Guevara M, Capelo R, Tardón A, Peiró-Perez R, Jiménez-Moleón JJ, Roca-Barceló A, Pérez-Gómez B, Dierssen-Sotos T, FernándezVilla T, Moreno-Iribas C, Moreno V, García-Pérez J, Castaño-Vinyals G, Pollán M, Aubé M, Kogevinas M, Evaluating the Association between Artificial Light-at-Night Exposure and Breast and Prostate Cancer Risk in Spain (MCC-Spain Study). Environ Health Perspect. 2018 Apr 23;126(4):047011.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more