Your Road to Wellness

Cardiovascular Disease

This function is involved in a variety conditions from viral diseases to heart disease, stroke and diabetes

Posted by on 7:25 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Green tea, Health, Nut consumption, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

Vascular endothelial cells line the entire circulatory system, from the heart to the smallest capillaries.  

The endothelium is the inner layer of the blood vessels and is extremely important.

When the endothelium is functioning normally, it helps to regulate blood clotting, assists the body’s immune response, controls the volume of fluid and the amount of electrolytes and other substances that pass from the blood into the tissues, and produces dilation or constriction of the blood vessels.

The endothelium is directly involved in peripheral vascular disease, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, insulin resistance,  chronic kidney failure, tumor growth, metastasis, venous thrombosis, and severe viral infectious diseases (Rajendran P, et.al., 2013).

Free radicals can disrupt the balance of NO (Nitric Oxide), damage the endothelium, and leave it overly permeable, allowing toxins to pass into body tissues (Rubanyi GM, Vanhoutte PM. et.al., 1986).

How can you keep the endothelium healthy?

A high nutrient, low glycemic index plant based diet will go a long way.  In addition to that you can eat some blueberries.

In this double blind crossover study the researchers gave the participants blueberry flavonoids and measured flow-mediated dilation (Rodriguez-Mateos A, et.al., 2013).

They found a significant increase in flow-mediated dilation at 1-2 and 6 h after consumption of the blueberry polyphenols.

The researchers concluded that blueberry intake acutely improves vascular function in healthy men.

You can also drink green tea.

Low-mediated dilation significantly improved after drinking green tea, and has a beneficial effect on endothelial function (Alexopoulos N, et.al., 2008).

References

Alexopoulos N1, Vlachopoulos C, Aznaouridis K, Baou K, Vasiliadou C, Pietri P, Xaplanteris P, Stefanadi E, Stefanadis C.The acute effect of green tea consumption on endothelial function in healthy individuals. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2008 Jun;15(3):300-5.

Rajendran P, Rengarajan T, Thangavel J, Nishigaki Y, Sakthisekaran D, Sethi G, Nishigaki I.The vascular endothelium and human diseases. Int J Biol Sci. 2013 Nov 9;9(10):1057-69.

Rodriguez-Mateos A1, Rendeiro C, Bergillos-Meca T, Tabatabaee S, George TW, Heiss C, Spencer JP.Intake and time dependence of blueberry flavonoid-induced improvements in vascular function: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study with mechanistic insights into biological activityAm J Clin Nutr. 2013 Nov;98(5):1179-91.

Rubanyi GM, Vanhoutte PM. Superoxide anions and hyperoxia inactivate endothelium-derived relaxing factor.Am J Physiol. 1986 May;250(5 Pt 2):H822-7.

 

 

 

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Not only what we eat but how the food is prepared can either help us or hurt us

Posted by on 7:44 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health Risk, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Advanced glycation end products are compounds that can be found in food and they also can be formed when the food is cooked.

Glycation takes place when sugar reacts with fat and protein, and can also be formed when the blood glucose is high.  

These products accumulate intracellularly and extracellularly in all tissues and body fluids and can cross-link with other proteins and affect their normal functions (Chen JH, et.al., 2018). Glycation end products can interact with specific cell surface receptors and alter intracellular signaling, gene expression, the production of reactive oxygen species and activate several inflammatory pathways.

High levels of these products in the diet as well as in tissues and the circulation are pathogenic to a wide range of diseases.

When glycation end products accumulate in bones and joints, they can contribute to osteoporosis and osteoarthritis and also affect mobility.

Since glycation end products contributes to increased oxidative stress and inflammation, they  also contribute to cardiovascular disease and diabetes (Uribarri J, et.al., 2010).

It’s important to avoid glycation as much as possible, and the these researchers also tested a lot of common foods and the way the preparation of these food affected the accumulation of glycation.

They found that dry cooking at high temperature like frying, grilling and baking was producing the most glycation.

They also documented that animal source protein was higher in these products and the more fat they contained the worse it was.

Plant based foods were the lowest in glycation end products and did not accumulate much of these products when cooked.

The best way was to boil or steam the food, that was less damaging. Marinating food in lemon or vinegar to lower the the ph was also found to reduce glycation.

What else can you do to reduce the damage of glycation?

You can use curcumine which helps reduce free radical damage and inflammation (Yamagishi SI, et.al., 2017).

If you are going to use curcumine, be sure is is in a better absorbed form since regular curcumin is not well absorbed.

References

Chen JH, Lin X, Bu C, Zhang X.Role of advanced glycation end products in mobility and considerations in possible dietary and nutritional intervention strategies. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2018 Oct 10;15:72.

Uribarri J, Woodruff S, Goodman S, Cai W, Chen X, Pyzik R, Yong A, Striker GE, Vlassara H. Advanced glycation end products in foods and a practical guide to their reduction in the dietJ Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jun;110(6):911-16.e12.

Yamagishi SI, Matsui T, Ishibashi Y, Isami F, Abe Y, Sakaguchi T, Higashimoto Y.Yamagishi SI,Phytochemicals Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) and the Receptor System. Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(8):1135-1141

 

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk by affecting this nerve

Posted by on 6:35 pm Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Disease, General Health, Health Risk, Risk of death, Stay healthy, Stress | 0 comments

You don’t need any equipment or take any pills to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk.

When a broad range of indicators of vagal function were tested, the researchers of the following study showed that decreased vagal function is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality (Thayer JF, Lane RD, 2007).

The vagus nerve–which is the 10th cranial nerve–is involved in numerous functions and has a big impact on how we feel and function.

How can we affect the vagus nerve?

You can activate the vagus nerve by breathing at a rate of 6 breaths per minute.

Slow and deep breathing with equal duration of inhalation and exhalation for 5 minutes was found to significantly decrease systolic blood pressure (Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, 2011).

It does not take much time to see the benefits from implementing this type of breathing, you notice a difference in the way you feel within some few minutes.

This is diaphragmatic breathing where you see your abdomen rising when you breathe in and lowering as you breathe out.

With some practice you will automatically breathe this way most of the the time, which will make you more relaxed.

References

Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, Madanmohan.Immediate effect of sukha pranayama on cardiovascular variables in patients of hypertension.Int J Yoga Therap. 2011;(21):73-6.

Thayer JF, Lane RD.The role of vagal function in the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality.Biol Psychol. 2007 Feb;74(2):224-42.

 

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What type of protein is best if you want to live longer?

Posted by on 7:32 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health Risk, Nut consumption, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

Does the source of protein really matter as long as we get an adequate supply?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.  85 013 women and 46 329 men, a total of 131342 participants were included in this research (Song M, et.al., 2016).

They examined the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality.

The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein  and 4% for plant protein.

The researchers concluded that high animal protein intake was positively associated with cardiovascular mortality, and high plant protein intake was inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, especially among individuals with at least 1 lifestyle risk factor.

The worst form of protein was processed red meat.

If you want to improve your odds of living longer, plant protein is what you should eat.

A common trait for populations known to live longer, is that they eat very little animal protein, they only do it occasionally.

Research has also documented that we don’t need a lot of protein. It’s a common misconception that we need a Iot, most people in the western world unless they are vegetarians, eat more protein than they need.

If you eat a plant based diet which includes beans, nuts and seeds, you will not get more protein than you need, but you will get enough.

Reference

Song M, Fung TT, Hu FB, Willett WC, Longo VD, Chan AT, Giovannucci EL, Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 1;176(10):1453-1463.

 

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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How and when does cardiovascular disease start?

Posted by on 8:55 pm Anti-aging, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Eating, Fat, HDL, Heart disease | 0 comments

 

The clogged pipe analogy is the old, but outdated model of explaining cardiovascular disease which still is used most of the time because of lack of understanding and lack of exposure to research (Rothberg MB, 2013).

According to this model, cholesterol plaque in the arterial walls slowly reduce the opening of the artery, first causing decreased blood flow without symptoms, then it causes angina (chest pain), and eventually it results in an infarction.

Treatments based on this theory include both coronary bypass surgery and angioplasty opening the blood vessel with a stent or a balloon.

While a massive plaque eventually can close up an artery, a heart attack is usually caused by unstable plaque thatmay not be easily detected, but can rupture and form a clot.

This is what happens according to more in depth research.

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) mainly produced in the liver may infiltrate the vascular endothelium (the inner wall of the blood vessel), where it can initiate a complex inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can lead to arterial remodeling, in which plaque growth within the vessel walls is accommodated by outward enlargement of the vessel.

In that case, large plaques may not reduce the opening of the blood vessel and are therefore hidden from angiography.

These plaques are particularly dangerous both because they are prone to rupture, they are unstable, and because before rupture they do not limit the blood flow and therefore do not induce formation of protective collaterals.

If the blood flow slowly gets restricted as in stable plaque, the body will compensate by making new blood vessels to support the area in need, that’s why stable plaque is less dangerous.

A lot of people apparently have several plaque ruptures in their vascular system without symptoms.These ruptures can heal and is later impossible to detect.

For these reasons it’s very difficult to use available scanning methods as reliable tools to predict  a deadly plaque rupture.

There is however strong evidence that addressing the extent and activity of the atherosclerotic burden and thrombosis-promoting risk factors will improve risk (Arbab-Zadeh A, et.al., 2015).

Oxidized LDL is especially damaging to the endothelium, the inner lining of the blood vessels (Gradinaru D, et al., 2015).

Oxidized LDL cholesterol is associated with early atherosclerosis (Calmarza P, et.al., 2014).

When does atherosclerosis start?

It start at a very young age.

Atherosclerosis varied from 17% in individuals less than 20 years old to 85% in people 50 years old or older (Tuzcu EM, et.al., 2001).

If you have children, this is something to keep in mind. It is very important to have a healthy diet even for a child.

References

Arbab-Zadeh A, Fuster V.The myth of the “vulnerable plaque”: transitioning from a focus on individual lesions to atherosclerotic disease burden for coronary artery disease risk assessment.J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Mar 3;65(8):846-855.

Calmarza P1, Trejo JM, Lapresta C, López P,LDL oxidation and its association with carotid artery intima-media thickness and other cardiovascular risk factors in a sample of Spanish general population.Angiology. 2014 Apr;65(4):357-62.

Gradinaru D, Borsa C, Ionescu C, Prada GI,Oxidized LDL and NO synthesis–Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and ageing.Mech Ageing Dev. 2015 Nov;151:101-13.

Rothberg MB,Coronary artery disease as clogged pipes: a misconceptual model.Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2013 Jan 1;6(1):129-32.

Tuzcu EM1, Kapadia SR, Tutar E, Ziada KM, Hobbs RE, McCarthy PM, Young JB, Nissen SE.High prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic teenagers and young adults: evidence from intravascular ultrasound.Circulation. 2001 Jun 5;103(22):2705-10.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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