Your Road to Wellness

Diet

Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

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Does milk help prevent fractures?

Posted by on 9:28 am Anti-aging, Bone density, bone loss, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Milk is by most people believed to help support bone formation and reduce the risk for fractures, but is that true?

The following research investigated milk intake and the risk of mortality and fractures in women and men (Michaelsson K, et.al., 2014).

This study was done in Sweden and included 61,433 women and 45,339 men. The average follow up for the women was 20.1 year and for the men 11.2 years.

High milk intake was associated with higher mortality for both women and men, and with a higher fracture

incidence in women.

It’s common to recommend milk for teenagers to promote increased bone mass.

To determine whether milk consumption during teenage years influences the risk of hip fracture in older adults, the researchers of this study included both women and men and did 22 years of follow-up (Feskanich D, et.al., 2014).

After controlling for known risk factors and current milk consumption, each additional glass of milk per day during teenage years was associated with a significant 9% higher risk of hip fracture in men.

It was concluded that greater milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults.

These studies were population studies using food frequency questionnaires which is not as accurate as double blinded research comparing 2 groups.

However, when the research includes large population groups and both show the same results, it’s worthwhile to pay attention to the results.

References

Michaëlsson K, Wolk A, Langenskiöld S, Basu S, Warensjö Lemming E, Melhus H, Byberg L. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies.BMJ. 2014 Oct 28;349:g6015.

Feskanich D, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Frazier AL, Willett WC. Milk consumption during teenage years and risk of hip fractures in older adults. JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Jan;168(1):54-60.

 

 

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Your blood glucose level affects the health of your blood vessels.

Posted by on 9:49 am Bloodsugar, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Glucose, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

Everybody agrees that to be able to function well and live a long life, we need good blood circulation. This necessitates a healthy vascular system.

Your vascular system is especially important for your heart, brain, and the rest of your body because the blood delivers nutrients and oxygen. Without a supply of nutrients, the tissue will degenerate. So what can you do to keep your vascular system healthy?

Books can be written on that topic, but here is a simple strategy you can implement that can make a big difference.

First, since most of us eat several meals daily and the after effect of a meal can have a pronounced effect on your blood vessels, think about how the meal will affect your blood glucose level.

The reason you should be concerned with this is that high glucose levels after a meal and insulin resistance cause damage to the endothelium–the inner layer of the blood vessel wall (Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM, 2017).

Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by decreased release of nitric oxide, increased oxidative stress, increased production of inflammatory factors, and impaired endothelial repair.

This is one of the reasons you can end up with atherosclerosis and reduced blood circulation.

Since one of the reasons for endothelial function can be that the blood glucose level after a meal is too high, many are now recommending low carbohydrate meals. This is done as an attempt to lower the blood glucose.

This, however, may not be the the best strategy.

Research to date suggests that diets that are low in carbohydrates may negatively impact vascular endothelial function (Jovanovski E, et.al., 2015).

It appears that it is more favourable to maintain the carbohydrate intake and instead use low glycemic index foods. This generates more benefits for the vascular system.

An easy way to do that is to add some beans or lentils to the meal and reduce the amount of a higher glycemic index item.

References

Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM.Macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes.J Diabetes. 2017 May;9(5):434-449.

Jovanovski E, Zurbau A, Vuksan V, Carbohydrates and endothelial function: is a low-carbohydrate diet or a low-glycemic index diet favourable for vascular health?Clin Nutr Res. 2015 Apr;4(2):69-75.

 

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Can nuts improve insulin sensitivity even in diabetics?

Posted by on 5:17 am Diabetes, Diet, Eating, General Health, Insulin resistance, Nut consumption | 0 comments

It is important to be as insulin sensitive as possible.

When you are insulin sensitive, your insulin effectively transfers the glucose from you blood into the cells where you can use it for energy, and your blood glucose stays in a low and normal range.

Elevated blood glucose will cause problems because it will increase inflammation, free radicals and damage your tissue. That’s why people with diabetes are much more susceptible to chronic diseases.

High glycemic index carbohydrates will raise your blood glucose too high because this type of food is converted to sugar and absorbed fast. Especially flour (white bread), potatoes and white rice will do that, but foods like whole grain bread, at least the regular whole grain bread you normally get in the store, as well as brown rice, unless you have very little a one time, will do that also.

That’s why substituting those foods for something else can make a significant difference.

That is exactly what was done in the following study.

The research was carried out in a hospital research center.

A group of men and women with type 2 diabetes was put on one of three diets for 3 months (Jenkins DJA, et.al., 2018).

One group was put on a diet getting 477 calories from 75 grams of mixed nuts, one group got 471 calories from 3 whole wheat muffins, and one group got half a serving of the nuts and half a serving of the muffins.

The group consuming the 75 grams of nuts showed a reduction in Hemoglobin A1c, a marker of long term glucose control, compared to the group having the muffins.

Several cardiovascular risk factors also improved in group eating the 75 grams of nuts daily.

Nuts works better than whole grains if you want to improve your glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors.

75 grams of nuts are approximately 2 and a half handfuls of nuts.

Reference

Jenkins DJA, Kendall CWC, Lamarche B, Banach MS, Srichaikul K, Vidgen E, Mitchell S, Parker T, Nishi S, Bashyam B, de Souza RJ, Ireland C, Pichika SC, Beyene J, Sievenpiper JL, Josse RG. Nuts as a replacement for carbohydrates in the diabetic diet: a reanalysis of a randomised controlled trial.Diabetologia. 2018 Aug;61(8):1734-1747.

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Can nuts reduce the formation of vascular plaque?

Posted by on 9:54 pm Antioxidents, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, Health, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Plaque formation in the vascular system is something we are better off without, not only because it will increase cardiovascular risk, but we need good blood circulation to all tissue we have. Blood vessels in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients have, for example, been found to have a lot of plaque.

What can we do to help reduce plaque formation?

A high nutrient, low-glycemic index plant-based diet is a good choice, but is it possible to only add one food, and see a significant reduction in vascular plaque?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.

They measured the internal carotid intima-media thickness and plaque height using ultrasound at the start and after an average follow up of 2.4 years(Sala-Vila A, et.al, 2014).

Carotid intima-media thickness is the thickness of the inner layer of the blood vessel.

The participants consumed a Mediterranean diet. One group added either virgin olive oil or 30 grams of nuts every day to their diet. The control group consumed a low fat diet.

These were the results:

Compared with the control diet, consumption of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts was associated with delayed progression of  intima-media thickness and plaque.

It is also interesting that there were no changes after the Mediterranean diet with the added virgin olive oil.

What could be the reason for that?

A good assumption would be that nuts contain nutrients the olive oil is missing, especially antioxidants.

Oil even if it is a good oil is not as good as natural unprocessed food.

30 grams of nuts is only one big handful.

Get in the habit of reducing your intake of grains and use some nuts instead. That will work a lot better for you (unless you are allergic to nuts). 

Reference

Sala-Vila A, Romero-Mamani ES, Gilabert R, Núñez I, de la Torre R, Corella D, Ruiz-Gutiérrez V, López-Sabater MC, Pintó X, Rekondo J, Martínez-González MÁ, Estruch R, Ros E.Changes in ultrasound-assessed carotid intima-media thickness and plaque with a Mediterranean diet: a substudy of the PREDIMED trial.Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):439-45.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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What is the best predictor of aging?

Posted by on 3:10 am Anti-Aging, Diet, Eating, Health, Inflammation, Low glycemic meals, Vegetables | 0 comments

 

Chronological and physiological age is not the same.

You can be younger than your actual years or you can be older. This depends a lot on your diet and lifestyle.

The referenced research was conducted to figure out the most important drivers for successful aging (Arai Y, et.al., 2015). This is important because you don’t want to just live for a long time, you want to stay healthy as you get older.

1554 individuals were included in the study, and 684 were 100-105 years old and 105-109 years old. There were also 536 who were 85-99 year old and some children of the 100-105 years old.

The researchers looked at multiple biomarkers and this is what they found.

Inflammation predicted all-cause mortality in the 85-99 years old and in the 105-109 years old.

Inflammation also predicted capability and cognition in 105-109 year olds better than chronologic age.

The inflammation score was also lower in the children of these individuals compared to age-matched controls.

if you want to function well  as you get older, Inflammation is the most important factor to keep low. 

It is important to keep in mind that oxidative stress is also involved in inflammation.

Oxidative stress due to oxidant/antioxidant imbalance, and also due to environmental oxidants is an important component during inflammation and respiratory diseases, asthma being one of those conditions (Biswas SK, Rahman I, 2009).

This is what you can do to keep inflammation low.  Implement a high nutrient, low glycemic index, plant based diet.

Take a well absorbed form of  Curcumin and Boron. Both of these compounds have shown to reduce inflammation.

Take S-Acetyl Glutathione which is a form of Glutathione shown to get into the cells. Glutathione is the body’s most effective protection against free radical damage. It also regulates the immune function.

References

Arai Y1, Martin-Ruiz CM, Takayama M, Abe Y, Takebayashi T, Koyasu S, Suematsu M, Hirose N, von Zglinicki T,Inflammation, but not Telomere length, predicts successful ageing at extreme old age: A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians.EBioMedicine. 2015 Jul 29;2(10):1549-58.

Biswas SK, Rahman I.Environmental toxicity, redox signaling and lung inflammation: The role of glutathioneMol Aspects Med. 2009 Feb-Apr;30(1-2):60-76.

 

 

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