Your Road to Wellness

Brain

Which is better for lowering the risk of dementia, fruit or vegetables?

Posted by on 5:58 pm BMJ Formula, Brain, Diet | 0 comments

When several studies including a total of 44004 participants were evaluated for the consumption of fruit and vegetables and their association of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline, this is what the researchers found (Loef M, Walach H, 2012).

Most of the studies found that higher consumption of vegetables, but not fruit is associated with a decreased risk of dementia or cognitive decline. 

Is there anything specific in vegetables that seem to be more important?

The author of this article also stated the following (Johnson EJ, 2012).

An examination of centenarians found a relationship between cognition and lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in the brain tissue.

Zeaxanthin concentrations in brain tissue were significantly related to cognitive function, memory retention, verbal fluency, and dementia severity after adjustment for age, sex, education, hypertension, and diabetes.

Lutein concentrations in the brain were significantly lower in individuals with mild cognitive impairment than in those with normal cognitive function.

Another study also mentioned in this article found that supplementation with 12 mg a day of lutein by itself or in combination with 800 mg of DHA daily for 4-months, in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with older women provided benefits.

Verbal fluency scores improved significantly in the DHA, lutein, and combined-treatment groups. Memory scores and rate of learning also improved significantly in the combined-treatment group.

What kind of vegetables contains the highest amount of zeaxanthin and lutein?

Kale is on top with spinach second.

Put some in your salad and cook some and add it to your dinner.

References
Johnson EJ. A possible role for lutein and zeaxanthin in cognitive function in the elderly. Am J Clin Nutr.
2012 Nov;96(5):1161S-5S.

Loef M, Walach H. Fruit, vegetables and prevention of cognitive decline or dementia: a systematic
review of cohort studies. J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Jul;16(7):626-30. Review.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

What foods affect your memory?

Posted by on 6:09 am Brain, Diet, Health | 0 comments

 

It takes several years before you see the results from the wrong food choices. That’s why it’s better to make changes to the way you eat before you notice symptoms of neurodegeneration like you see in Alzheimer’s disease.

Less serious symptoms like forgetfulness called mild cognitive decline is something to pay attention to.

Start to implement good eating habits avoiding foods that research has found to be contributing to neurodegeneration, and include foods that are beneficial for the nervous system and the brain if it is supported by scientific evidence.

When somebody recommends a certain type of food, be sure there is evidence supporting the benefits of consuming this with a scientific reference, not a reference from the popular press.

There is a lot of believes presented as evidence even by doctors, be a little bit skeptical and read what the references say and see if you agree.

A lot has been written about fat lately, and saturated fat is promoted by many as very healthy and something you should eat a lot of.

The following study evaluated 6,183 older participants and their intake of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (Okereke OI, et.al., 2012).

The participants were tested using several cognitive tests, and their cognitive abilities were related to the type of fat they were consuming.

Higher saturated fat intake was associated with worse cognition.

Higher monounsaturated fat was related to better cognition.

Where do we find saturated fat? The major sources come from animal type fat like meat, cheese and other dairy products.

What other types of food may help your memory?

Vegetables, unsaturated fats, and a high score for the Mediterranean diet were found to reduce the odds ratio for mild cognitive decline (Roberts RO, et.al., 2010).

 

References

Okereke OI, Rosner BA, Kim DH, Kang JH, Cook NR, Manson JE, Buring JE, Willett WC, Grodstein F. Dietary fat types and 4-year cognitive change in community-dwelling older women. Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):124-34.

Roberts RO, Geda YE, Cerhan JR, Knopman DS, Cha RH, Christianson TJ, Pankratz VS, Ivnik RJ, Boeve BF, O’Connor HM, Petersen RC. Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(5):413-23.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

 

Magnesium is Even More Important than We Used to Think

Posted by on 9:24 pm Brain, Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Gastrointestinal Health, General Health, Health, magnesium, Vitamin D | 0 comments

Research is documenting how functions, organs, and nutrients are all interconnected. We cannot look at anything as separate entities anymore if we are going to get an accurate impression of what happens physiologically from the input of nutrient intake as well as exercise. The GI tract is one example where researchers have documented communication between the GI tract and the brain. We know the brain also communicates with the GI tract.

Intestinal absorption and subsequent metabolism of a nutrient, to a certain extent, is dependent on the availability of other nutrients.

The following research is showing us how the intake and the impact of magnesium are affecting vitamin D levels.

Image result for magnesium

Magnesium assists in the activation of vitamin D because all of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium (Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS, 2018).

Deficiency in either of these nutrients is reported to be associated with skeletal deformities, cardiovascular diseases, and the metabolic syndrome.

The next study indicates the same thing. The researchers found that higher intake of magnesium resulted in higher blood levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which is the most reliable way to measure vitamin D status (Deng X, et.al., 2013).

They also found associations of serum 25(OH)D with mortality, particularly due to cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer, and they were modified by magnesium intake. Magnesium has shown to reduce calcification of the arteries (Hruby A, et.al., 2014).

This means that if you must take a very high amount of vitamin D to keep your vitamin D level in a good range, you most likely need magnesium. If you take enough magnesium in a well-absorbed form, you should not need to take high amounts of vitamin D to keep it at a good level. What we also learn from research like this, is how important it is to take magnesium or any of the other common minerals in a formula that combines these minerals, since they affect each other. Amino acid chelates are the best form to take minerals because they are better absorbed and better tolerated. They don’t cause gastrointestinal irritation.

 

 

References
Deng X, Song Y, Manson JE, Signorello LB, Zhang SM, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Seidner DL, Dai Q. Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III. BMC Med. 2013 Aug 27;11:187.

Hruby A1, O’Donnell CJ2, Jacques PF1, Meigs JB3, Hoffmann U4, McKeown NM5. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Jan;7(1):59-69.

Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS. Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2018 Mar 1;118(3):181-189.

The BMJ Formula
an easy way to effectively support bone, joints, connective tissue and neuromuscular function.

Read more

This has Shown to Improve Memory, and it is Easy to Implement

Posted by on 11:26 am Alzheimer’s, Arthritis, BMJ Formula, Brain, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, Health, Inflammation, Memory | 0 comments

Image result for low grade inflammationLow grade inflammation, the type of inflammation you usually don’t know you have, is harmful for all tissue, including the brain. Curcumin found in the spice turmeric has been shown to decrease inflammation and was for that reason studied to determine if it could provide protection for the brain.

40 participants were given either curcumin in a bioavailable form twice daily or a placebo for 18 months (Small GW, et.al., 2018). The participants did not have dementia, and the researchers found that taking curcumin twice daily, improved their memory and attention.

PET scanning suggested that the improvements were associated with a decrease in amyloid and tau accumulation in brain areas regulating mood and memory. Image result for amyloid and tau alzheimers brain

Amyloid and tau accumulation are usually found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Earlier research with another bioavailable form of curcumin showed that 1 hour after taking the curcumin, the participants experienced significant improvement in attention and working memory (Cox KH, et.al., 2015).

Taking a capsule twice a day is very easy and something everybody can do.

References
Small GW1, Siddarth P2, Li Z2, Miller KJ2, Ercoli L2, Emerson ND2, Martinez J2, Wong KP2, Liu J2, Merrill DA2, Chen ST2, Henning SM2, Satyamurthy N2, Huang SC2, Heber D2, Barrio JR2. Memory and Brain Amyloid and Tau Effects of a Bioavailable Form of Curcumin in Non-Demented Adults: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 18-Month Trial. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Mar;26(3):266 277.

Cox KH1, Pipingas A1, Scholey AB2. Investigation of the effects of solid lipid curcumin on cognition and mood in a healthy older population. J Psychopharmacol. 2015 May;29(5):642-51.

Better Curcumin

Curcumin is a good antioxidant, but it is especially effective in helping to reduce inflammation. For these reasons, curcumin provides many health benefits.

Read more…

Help improve brain function and decrease inflammation with small amounts of this mineral.

Posted by on 4:25 pm BMJ Formula, Brain, Health, Inflammation | 0 comments

The research on the mineral boron started many years ago, and the more it has been studied the more we realize how important this mineral is. It turns out that it is involved in a huge number of important functions (Pizzorno L, 2015).

The following article describes how low boron intake can affect brain function and cognitive performance (Penland JG, 1994).

 

When compared to high intake of boron, low boron intake resulted in significant poorer performance in several areas, some of were eye-hand coordination, attention, long and short-term memory.

 

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study conducted on patients diagnosed

with osteoarthritis 2 common inflammatory markers, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and TNF-alpha decreased significantly after 1 week of boron supplementation (Naghil MR, et.al., 2011).

 

Boron supplementation has even showed benefits for rheumatoid arthritis.

After 60 days of supplementation with boron, a significant decrease in the inflammatory markers erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-1alpha, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were found (Hussain SA, et.al., 2016).

 

Symptoms were also improved.

 

References

Hussain SA, Abood SJ, Gorial FI. The adjuvant use of calcium fructoborate and borax with etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Pilot study. J Intercult Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Dec 8;6(1):58-64.

Naghii MR, Mofid M, Asgari AR, Hedayati M, Daneshpour MS. Comparative effects of daily and weekly boron supplementation on plasma steroid hormones and proinflammatory cytokines. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2011 Jan;25(1):54-8. Pizzorno L. Nothing Boring About Boron. ntegr Med (Encinitas). 2015 Aug;14(4):35-48.

Scorei R, Mitrut P, Petrisor I, Scorei I. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the effect of calcium fructoborate on systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia markers for middle-aged people with primary osteoarthritis. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2011 Dec;144(1-3):253-63.

 

 

 

Better Curcumin

 We added boron to provide even more benefits. There is no other formula like this.

Read more

Is there a connection between Cardiovascular risk and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Posted by on 5:33 pm Alzheimer’s, Brain, Dementia, General Health | 0 comments

 

An increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease is linked to the presence of apoE4, a genetic factor, which is also strongly associated with developing atherosclerosis which increases the risk for Cardiovascular disease (Altman R, Rutledge JC, 2010).                                                                     

The authors of the same article state that cardiovascular risk factors, including elevated blood cholesterol and triglycerides, increase the likelihood of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

 

Researchers have also found that atherosclerosis causing obstruction of arteries at the base of the brain was more extensive in a group with Alzheimer’s disease when compared with a control group without dementia (Roher AE, et.al., 2011).

 

Arterial stiffness, atherosclerosis, endothelial degeneration and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier can induce several features of Alzheimer’s disease including atrophy of certain areas of the brain (Kalaria RN, et.al., 2012). The endothelium is the inner lining of the blood vessels.

 

 

There are also other risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, I will write more about that later.

 

Making changes to the way you eat is the most effective way to reduce cardiovascular risk, and you would most likely also reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia at the same time.  

When we correct the reasons for chronic conditions, we see an improvement in many areas, since the same reasons are involved in most chronic conditions.

 

 

References

Altman R, Rutledge JC. The vascular contribution to Alzheimer’s disease. Clin Sci (Lond). 2010 Aug 5;119(10):407-21.

Kalaria RN, Akinyemi R, Ihara M. Does vascular pathology contribute to Alzheimer changes? J Neurol Sci. 2012 Nov 15;322(1-2):141-7.

Roher AE, Tyas SL, Maarouf CL, Daugs ID, Kokjohn TA, Emmerling MR, Garami Z, Belohlavek M, Sabbagh MN, Sue LI, Beach TG. Intracranial atherosclerosis as a contributing factor to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Alzheimers Dement. 2011 Jul;7(4):436-44.

 

Learn to Eat Program

Here’s What You Will Get:

  • A simple program that explains food that helps you lose weight and become healthy.
  • Fast, easy and delicious recipes…

Read more