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Reduce Inflammation By Adding 1 Food

Reduce Inflammation By Adding 1 Food

Posted by on Anti-aging, General Health, Health Risk, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor | 0 comments

You can reduce inflammation by adding just 1 type of food to your diet.

If you also remove another food, you will get even better results.

When a group of type 2 diabetes patients replaced 2 servings of red meat with different types of legumes like lentils, chickpeas, peas and beans for only 3 days per week for 8 weeks, this was the result (Hosseinpour-Niazi S, et.al., 2015).

 

heart shape by various vegetables and fruits

The legumes resulted in significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory markers hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, compared to when they ingested the red meat instead of the legumes.

 

After consuming a legume diet for 6 weeks, comparing it to their regular diet, first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes had significantly reduced levels of hs-CRP (Saraf-Bank F, et.al., 2015).

Women with the highest legume intake had lower levels of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha compared to the ones with the lowest intake (Ezmaillzadeh A, Azakbakht L, 2012).

 

Just by adding beans or lentils to your meals, you can reduce low-grade inflammation significantly.

That is not difficult. Adding beans to a salad is easy, and if you substitute potatoes or rice with beans or lentils, you should notice a nice difference in your inflammatory markers.

Not only will you see a difference there, but most likely you will also see a reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well.

 

 

References:

  1. Hosseinpour-Niazi, S., Mirmiran, P., Fallah-Ghohroudi, A., & Azizi, F. (2015). Non-soya legume-based therapeutic lifestyle change diet reduces inflammatory status in diabetic patients: a randomised cross-over clinical trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 114(2), 213-219.
  2. Saraf-Bank, S., Esmaillzadeh, A., Faghihimani, E., & Azadbakht, L. (2015). Effect of non-soy legume consumption on inflammation and serum adiponectin levels among first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes: A randomized, crossover study. Nutrition, 31(3), 459-465.
  3. Esmaillzadeh, A., & Azadbakht, L. (2012). Legume consumption is inversely associated with serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers among Iranian women. The Journal of nutrition, 142(2), 334-339.

Learn To Eat Program:

Recommendations that work. Foods that can reduce inflammation. This is not a regular diet.