Your Road to Wellness

Women

Osteoarthritis in women associated with deposits in Arteries

Posted by on Asthma, Calories, Eating, Energy, Exercise, General Health, General Health, Health Risk, Heart disease, Muscles, Nervous System, Research, Wellness, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

Research sometimes find interesting connections we usually don’t think about.

A study including 3278 women found an association between plaque in the carotid artery and osteoarthritis in the knee and hands in women (Hoeven TA, et.al., 2013).

We know that inflammation is involved in osteoarthritis, even if it is less severe than in rheumatoid arthritis.

We also know that inflammation increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. Inflammation is an important factor in depositing cholesterol and fat into the inner lining of the vascular wall.

 

Another interesting connection found lower magnesium levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to controls (Chavan VU, et.al., 2015).

Lower magnesium levels were also correlated with higher cholesterol and LDL, the so called bad cholesterol, and higher magnesium levels with better HDL cholesterol, the good cholesterol. This was in cases of rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Magnesium has also been found to be inversely associated with osteoarthritis documented on x-rays and joint space narrowing (Zeng C, et.al., 2015).

Glucosamine sulfate another nutritional substance has been used to treat osteoarthritis for many years.

When osteoarthritic chondrocytes (cartilage cells) and glucosamine sulfate were tested in different ways in a culture, it was found that glucosamine sulfate reduced the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (Largo R, et.al., 2003).

Taking magnesium and glucosamine sulfate could according to this possibly benefit both your cardiovascular system and your joints.

The best form of magnesium is an amino acid chelate like magnesium glycinate.

The most common form of magnesium is magnesium oxide, but that is a gastrointestinal irritant and can give you diarrhea when taken in higher amounts.

 

REFERENCE

Chavan, V. U., Ramavataram, D. V. S. S., Patel, P. A., & Rupani, M. P. (2015). Evaluation of serum magnesium, lipid profile and various biochemical parameters as risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of clinical and diagnostic research: JCDR, 9(4), BC01.

Hoeven, T. A., Kavousi, M., Clockaerts, S., Kerkhof, H. J., van Meurs, J. B., Franco, O., … & Bierma-Zeinstra, S. (2012). Association of atherosclerosis with presence and progression of osteoarthritis: the Rotterdam Study. Annals of the rheumatic diseases, annrheumdis-2011.

Largo R, Alvarez-Soria MA, Díez-Ortego I, Calvo E, Sánchez-Pernaute O, Egido J, Herrero-Beaumont G. Glucosamine inhibits IL-1beta-induced NFkappaB activation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003 Apr;11(4):290-8.

Zeng C, Li H, Wei J, Yang T, Deng ZH, Yang Y, Zhang Y, Yang TB, Lei GH. Association between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis. PLoS One. 2015 May 26;10(5):e0127666.

 

 

 

 

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Can you change your estrogen metabolites by exercising?

Posted by on Breast cancer, Cervical Cancer, Endometrial cancer, Exercise, Exercise, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

Beautiful skinny woman riding a bike in fitnessWhat would be the benefits of changing your estrogen metabolites?
Certain estrogen metabolites are related to a higher risk for estrogen related diseases. Breast cancer is one of those diseases. If you could change the ratio between the harmless metabolites and the ones related to an increased risk for estrogen related problems you would be better off.
The reviewed research investigated if exercise could do that since exercise has shown to reduce the risk for breast cancer.(Smith AJ,et al. 2013).

The participants were healthy young women who were divided into either an exercise group doing 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise 5 days a week or a sedentary control group.  The study went on for approximately 16 weeks.

Estrogen’s and estrogen metabolites were measured,and the rates of the different metabolites were calculated. The change from the baseline measurements increased significantly in the exercise group for 2-OHE1/16α-OHE1 which is the ratio of the estrogen metabolites associated with a decreased risk for estrogen related diseases. This change was not seen in the control group.
 

The researchers concluded that this may be the mechanism by which increased physical activity is decreasing the risk for breast cancer.

Smith AJ1, Phipps WR, Thomas W, Schmitz KH, Kurzer MS. The effects of aerobic exercise on estrogen metabolism in healthy premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 May;22(5):756-64. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-1325.

Can this be the reason your mood is not good?

Posted by on Depression, General Health, Happiness, Health, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Stay healthy, Stress, Sunshine, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness, Women | 0 comments

young woman holding earlobes with frownYou want to be happy and not feel depressed, and while we don’t understand all the reasons for depression, new research suggests that low-grade systemic inflammation may be involved(Wium-Andersen MK, et al. 2013).

This is exactly what the reviewed research investigated by measuring plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker. 73,131 participants both men and women between the age of 20 and 100 years were included.

The conclusion of the study was that elevated levels of CRP are associated with increased risk for psychological distress and depression in the general population.

Maybe this looks a little bit strange to you, but the food you eat could actually be contributing to this type of inflammation, and for that reason also affect your mood.

If you find this interesting take a look at The Learn to Eat Plan“.

Wium-Andersen MK1, Ørsted DD, Nielsen SF, Nordestgaard BG. Elevated C-reactive protein levels, psychological distress, and depression in 73, 131 individuals. JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):176-84. doi: 10.1001/2013.jamapsychiatry.102.

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Tomatoes Influence Breast Cancer Risk

Posted by on Breast cancer, Cancer, Eating, Eye Health, General Health, Stay healthy, Wellness, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

You have probably heard that tomatoes are good for your eyes because of an antioxidant called lycopene. Did you know that tomatoes can make a difference with breast cancer risk? The reviewed research investigated just that (Llanos AA, et al. 2014).

Add tomatoes and fight breast cancer70 postmenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer participated in the study. Their average age was 57.2 years. First they consumed a tomato-based diet which included at least 25 mg of lycopene daily for 10 weeks, and later they consumed a soy-based diet for 10 weeks which included at least 40 g of soy protein daily. The women were also tested for adiponectin and two other hormones.

Other research has documented a decreased risk for several types of cancers, including breast cancer when adiponectin is increasing(Kishida K, et Al. 2014).

When the subjects consumed the tomato-based diet, it was found that the adiponectin concentration increased. This indicates that tomato-based food is especially beneficial for women who are at higher risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. Don’t forget that tomatoes are beneficial for other things – especially your eyes!

 

 

 

 

Llanos AA1, Peng J, Pennell ML, Krok JL, Vitolins MZ, Degraffinreid CR, Paskett ED. Effects of tomato and soy on serum adipokine concentrations in postmenopausal women at increased breast cancer risk: a cross-over dietary intervention trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Feb;99(2):625-32. doi: 10.1210/jc.2013-3222. Epub 2014 Jan 1.
Kishida K1, Funahashi T2, Shimomura I3. Adiponectin as a routine clinical biomarker. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;28(1):119-30. doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2013.08.006. Epub 2013 Aug 20.

Casual Soda Drinker? Don't go there!

Posted by on Bloodsugar, Cancer, Diabetes, Endometrial cancer, General Health, Glucose, Post menopausal, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

drinkSugar sweetened beverages have been associated with type 2 diabetes, obesity and other health problems. The reviewed research specifically investigated the relationship with sugar intake, sugar sweetened beverages and endometrial cancer(Inoue-Choi M, et al. 2013).

The participants were 23,039 postmenopausal women. From 1986 to 2010, 506 cases of estrogen dependent endometrial cancers were identified.
When compared with women who never drank sugar sweetened beverages, the cancer risk was 78 percent higher for the women in the highest quintile.

A higher risk for endometrial cancer was also found with higher sugar intake.

Sugar and sweets are seriously a major health hazard increasing the risk for many types of chronic conditions. You will reduce the risk for all of these health hazards by changing the habit of consuming sugar and sugar sweetened beverages.

 

 

 

Inoue-Choi M, Robien K, Mariani A, Cerhan JR, Anderson KE. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and the Risk of Type I and Type II Endometrial Cancer among Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Nov 22. [Epub ahead of print]

Omega 3 fatty acid and prostate cancer

Posted by on Antioxidents, Breast cancer, General Health, Health, Prostate cancer, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

If you have watched the news lately, you have probably heard about a study linking increased risk of prostate cancer with omega 3 fatty acids ( Brasky TM, et al. 2013). The media, looking for big headlines, presented this as a new truth about omega 3 fat. Supposedly, it was now dangerous to eat fish and take fish oil. If you have followed this, you have probably also seen a lot of objections to that conclusion, and authorities in this field have been pointing out flaws in the study.

This study is a good example of bad science. The conclusion that omega 3 fatty acids are causing prostate cancer can not be made. It was not a cause and effect study, showing that if you take omega 3 fatty acids you get prostate cancer.

These researchers did not account for important risk factors for prostate cancer. Without doing that, a lot of things can be found to cause prostate cancer. The study participants who developed prostate cancer could have started to take omega 3 fat after they had already been diagnosed with prostate cancer, yet there was no information related to that possibility.

The study did not consider any of the research showing that omega 3 fatty acids are beneficial if you have prostate cancer. Harvard University researchers have completed research on the effects of omega 3 fatty acids from fish on prostate cancer incidence and mortality which included 20167 men and 382144 person-years of follow ups (Chavarro JE, et al. 2008). They found that omega 3 fatty acids from fish was unrelated to prostate cancer incidence, but may improve prostate cancer survival. A Canadian study found no strong evidence for a protective association of fish consumption with prostate cancer, but it did show a significant 63 percent reduction in prostate cancer specific mortality.

How about women, breast cancer and omega 3 fatty acids?

As an example, one study concluded that DHA, one of the active ingredients in omega 3 fatty acids from fish, may slow the proliferation of tumor cells and minimize their metastatic potential (Blanckaert V,et al. 2010). There are also numerous studies showing benefits for the brain as well as the cardiovascular system. I don’t think all of this research can be wrong, so I prefer to keep taking my omega 3 fish oil.

 

 

Blanckaert V, Ulmann L, Mimouni V, Antol J, Brancquart L, Chénais B. Docosahexaenoic acid intake decreases proliferation, increases apoptosis and decreases the invasive potential of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231. Int J Oncol. 2010 Mar;36(3):737-42.
Szymanski KM, Wheeler DC, Mucci LA. Fish consumption and prostate cancer risk: a review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1223-33. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29530. Epub 2010 Sep 15.
Brasky TM, Darke AK, Song X, Tangen CM, Goodman PJ, Thompson IM, Meyskens FL Jr, Goodman GE, Minasian LM, Parnes HL, Klein EA, Kristal AR. Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk in the SELECT Trial. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 Jul 10. [Epub ahead of print]
Chavarro JE, Stampfer MJ, Hall MN, Sesso HD, Ma J. A 22-y prospective study of fish intake in relation to prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1297-303.