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Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

Posted by on 8:39 am Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Lose fat, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

 

Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

 

Let’s see what science says about the effect of the ketogenic diet on the cardiovascular system.
The goal of this study was to measure changes in glucose, lipid, and inflammation (Rosenbaum
M, et al., 2019).
17 men were put on a baseline control diet for 4 weeks and then switched to a ketogenic diet for
4 weeks.
This is what the researchers found.
Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein were significantly
increased on the ketogenic diet.
These are all cardiovascular disease risk markers. Especially LDL cholesterol and C-reactive
protein which is an inflammatory marker.

 

 

Flow-mediated dilation is another indicator of vascular health.
In this study, obese participants were either consuming high fat or low-fat meals for 6 weeks
(Varady KA, et al., 2011).
After 6 weeks, flow-mediated dilation improved in the low-fat group with a 32% increase and was
impaired in the high-fat group with a 19% reduction.
When 42 participants consumed a ketogenic diet for 6 week LDL cholesterol increased
significantly with 10.7% (Urbain P, et al., 2017).

 

 

Research, in general, has shown an increase in LDL cholesterol with a high-fat diet.
Negative effects on the cardiovascular system seem to be a concern with high-fat diets even if
some people may respond more favorably to a ketogenic diet than others.

References:

Rosenbaum M, Hall KD, Guo J, Ravussin E, Mayer LS, Reitman ML, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Leibel
RL, Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis and Inflammation in Humans Following an Isocaloric
Ketogenic Diet. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Jun;27(6):971-981.

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H, Impact of a 6-week
non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical
parameters in healthy adults. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17.

Varady KA, Bhutani S, Klempel MC, Phillips SA. Improvements in vascular health by a low-fat
diet, but not a high-fat diet, are mediated by changes in adipocyte biology. Nutr J. 2011 Jan
20;10:8.

 

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

 

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood triglycerides, Body fat, Body mass index, Diet, Eating, Exercise, Fat, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Muscles, Sports performance, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

ketogenic diet

 

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

 

There is a lot of promotion and talk about the benefits of restricting carbohydrate intake and eating a high fat, ketogenic diet.

When you read things like that, always ask, where is the evidence? Is there any science supporting the claims?

There is agreement on that more lean muscle mass and a lower body fat percentage are beneficial. This is true for everybody, but especially athletes.

Before you go on a high-fat diet, you want to know how a regime like that will affect your lean muscle mass.

The following research included 42 healthy individuals that followed a ketogenic diet for 6 weeks consisting of the same calorie intake as their regular diet (Urbain P, et.al., 2017).

They were tested for several things at the start of the study and after 6 weeks.

 

 

VO2peak and peak power decreased after the ketogenic diet.

The participants lost equal amounts of fat and fat-free mass, which means they lost some muscle mass.

Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol increased significantly, LDL by 10.7% which is quite a lot, especially since LDL is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Glucose, insulin, and IGF-1 (a growth factor) dropped significantly by 3.0, 22.2 and 20.2%.

Another non-significant change was also seen.

 

ketogenic diet 2

 

Similar results were found when seventeen overweight or obese men were admitted to metabolic wards where they consumed a high-carbohydrate baseline diet for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of a ketogenic diet (Hall KD, et.al., 2016).

 

Body fat loss slowed during the ketogenic diet and coincided with increased protein utilization and loss of fat-free mass. These participants also lost muscle mass, and this study was done under very strict control.

 

Apparently a high-fat diet is not producing the amazing results some would want you to believe.

 

References

 

Hall KD, Chen KY, Guo J, Lam YY, Leibel RL, Mayer LE, Reitman ML, Rosenbaum M, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Ravussin E. Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):324-33.

 

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H.Impact of a 6-week non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical parameters in healthy adults.Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

How much do you have to exercise to improve your endurance and aerobic fitness?

Posted by on 7:28 am Exercise, Health, Intensity Training, Research, Sports performance, Vigorous Activity, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

 

A lot of people don’t exercise because they think they have to spend a lot of time doing it every week, and that does not appeal to them.  Let’s see what research has found.

Several years ago research was conducted on what was called high intensity short interval training. Since the start of that, a lot of research has been published on that topic, experimenting with different durations of exercise.

The original research started using a stationary bike doing 30 seconds intervals, peddling as hard as possible, then resting for up to 4 minutes. This was then repeated 4 to 6 times.

This regime was very effective documenting that just 2 minutes of actual exercise time produced the same results as an hour of regular intensity aerobic exercise.

So how little can you exercise and still improve your performance? Is 30 seconds interval as low as you can go?

The following research tested six sub elite triathletes comparing them with 6 endurance-trained sub elite athletes maintaining their normal training routine .(Jakeman J, et.al., 2012).

These athletes were already in good shape. It’s harder to improve the performance at that level, compared to starting with people out of shape.

6 of the participants did 10, 6 seconds sprints on a stationary bike with a resting period of 1 minute in between, 3 times a week for 2 weeks. The resistance on the bike was set to 7.5% of the body weight.

Two weeks of the high intensity short interval training resulted in a 10% decrease in a 10-km time trial.

The time taken to reach the onset of blood lactate accumulation, defined as the point where blood lactate reaches 4 mmol·L⁻¹) was significantly increased. This is another way of measuring improved aerobic fitness.

The actual exercise time was only 1 minute 3 times a week.

It is amazing, spending only 3 minutes a week for 2 weeks can improve aerobic performance.

If you want to improve cardiovascular fitness, but want to spend as little time as possible exercising, this is the way to do it.

You need a stationary bike to implement this protocol, but if you have that at home, you don’t necessarily even have to do the 10 sprints at one time. You can split them up throughout the day depending on what’s most convenient for you.

Other studies has documented that it is more beneficial to be active several times a day compared to exercising longer only once a day.

Lack of time is no longer a valid reason not to exercise. Most people would most likely have 3 minutes a week to spend on exercise considering the benefits.

Reference

Jakeman J, Adamson S, Babraj J.Extremely short duration high-intensity training substantially improves endurance performance in triathletes. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):976-81.

 

Research has shown that sitting for a long time can be bad, but you don’t have to be active for very long to reap huge benefits.

The program Exercise for Maximum Benefits incorporates the latest research to be sure that you really get maximum benefits.

Click here to learn more.

How do you think stress affects your metabolism?

Posted by on 8:55 am Eating, Eating, Exercise, Fat, Insulin resistance, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Weight loss | 0 comments

 

Fotolia,fatYou don’t want to have a slow metabolic rate because that would make it harder to maintain a lean body composition.
You can probably also agree that most of us are exposed to plenty of stress during a average day.
 

I think you will find the reviewed research interesting because it investigated how stress may affect our metabolic rate (Kiecolt-Glaser JK, et al. 2014).
 

Fifty-eight healthy women, with the average age of 53.1 years, participated in the study and were given high fat test meals. The day prior to eating the test meals, stressors were also assessed using a standard test. Fat and carbohydrate oxidation, triglycerides, cortisol, insulin and glucose were measured before and after the 2 high fat meals.

It was found that greater numbers of stressors were associated with lower fat oxidation after the meals and also higher insulin levels. The difference between stressors the day before and no stressors turned out to be 435 kj which is approximately 104 calories. The researchers estimated that it could add up to almost 11 pounds per year in weight gain.

This means that stress can contribute to weight gain.

You may not be able to control the factors contributing to stress, but you can, with some training, control how you react to stress.

In other words you can make yourself more stress resistant.
Meditation is a great tool for that.

 

 

 

Kiecolt-Glaser JK1, Habash DL2, Fagundes CP3, Andridge R4, Peng J4, Malarkey WB5, Belury MA6. Daily Stressors, Past Depression, and Metabolic Responses to High-Fat Meals: A Novel Path to Obesity. Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Jul 9. pii: S0006-3223(14)00385-0. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.05.018. [Epub ahead of print]

 

How healthy is green tea?

Posted by on 9:07 am Antioxidents, Bloodsugar, Diabetes, General Health, Glucose, Green tea, Insulin resistance, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Supplements, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

Grüner TeeGreen tea seems to be one of the best things you can drink for your health. One of the reasons is that it contains a lot of antioxidants.

One of the most important things we can do to stay healthy is to be sure we stay insulin sensitive. When we are insulin sensitive the glucose is transferred from the blood into the cells very easily without the pancreas having to release a lot of insulin. This will keep the blood glucose at a low and normal level, and also help to keep inflammation low, both are very important if we want to be healthy.

The reviewed research investigated if green tea could improve glucose control and increase insulin sensitivity(Liu K, et.al.,2013). 17 studies were included in the analysis. It showed that green tea consumption significantly reduced the fasting glucose and Hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is a test for long-term glucose control.

If you don’t like green tea and if you want to be sure your green tea does not contain a lot of pesticides, you can take it in capsule form like our Better Green Tea formula which meets the German standards for pesticide content, which is very strict.

 

 

 

Liu K1, Zhou R, Wang B, Chen K, Shi LY, Zhu JD, Mi MT. Effect of green tea on glucose control and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):340-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.052746. Epub 2013 Jun 26.

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Could gluten cause problems for everybody?

Posted by on 8:17 am Eating, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

3d render of digestive systemThere is more and more information published every day on adverse reactions to gluten.

We used to believe that if you did not have celiac disease, you would not have any issues with gluten. This does not seem to be true since there are different degrees of gluten intolerance. People who have celiac disease just have a very severe reaction to it.

A gastroenterologist and researcher at Harvard University has published a very interesting article on this subject(Fasano,A,2011).

The intestinal mucosa act as a barrier to protect us from pathogens and other particles that are not supposed to be absorbed into the blood. This is called intestinal permeability. Dr. Fasano explains that gliadin (a protein found in gluten) trigger IL-8 (an inflammatory cytokine) leading to recruitment of neutrophils. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell which are activated as a part of the body’s defense mechanism.

Gliadin increases intestinal permeability through the release of a substance called zonulin. When the intestinal permeability increases we may absorb both pathogens (bacterias) and larger proteins not intended to be absorbed, triggering an inflammatory response.

Gliadin also interacts with macrophages, another type of white blood cell. This establishes an inflammatory environment in the intestinal mucosa. Depending on genetic predisposition, we will then experience a more or less severe reaction. This may, for example, trigger an autoimmune response in someone who is predisposed to that.

In other words, it looks like gluten is triggering an inflammatory response in everybody, but because we don’t have exactly the same genes, we will not have exactly the same reaction.

Gluten is found in common grains, but gluten free grains are not without problems either because they elevate the blood glucose high.

There are; however, solutions to this which you will find in the Learn to Eat program.

 

 

 Fasano A.  Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.