Your Road to Wellness

Type 2 diabetes

2 important things to help you stay healthy and feel good.

Posted by on 9:00 am Diabetes, Diet, Eating, Energy, Health, Health Risk, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Low glycemic meals, Stay healthy, Supplements, Supplements for Conditions, Supplements List, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

blood glucose food

 

You need to keep your glucose metabolism healthy by keeping your blood glucose at a low and
normal level.
There are several reasons why this is important. When your blood glucose is elevated to a high
level as it tends to be when we get insulin resistant, and when we eat high glycemic index food,
we usually get tired.
Elevated blood glucose also leads to increased low-grade inflammation, and inflammation is the
the second thing you need to keep low to stay healthy.
Increasing CRP, an inflammatory marker, has been found with higher fasting glucose levels,
even among subjects with fasting glucose in the normal range (Aronson D. et.al., 2004).

 

 

Eating high nutrient, low glycemic index meals are important, and so is exercise.
There is however something else you also can do to keep your blood glucose lower.
You can take berberine, a natural plant derivative.
Berberine has shown to provide several health benefits. One of them is keeping the blood
glucose at a lower, normal level.

In the following study participants with type 2 diabetes were randomized to take either berberine
or metformin (a diabetic medication) for 3 months (Yin J, et.al., 2008).
The effect of berberine was found to be similar to metformin.
A significant decrease in hemoglobin A1c from 9.5% to 7.5% was found when taking berberine.
Hemoglobin A1c is a measurement of long term glucose control.
Fasting blood glucose was reduced with 34.9%, postprandial blood glucose with 43.9%, and
plasma triglycerides with 21.2%. Postprandial glucose is the blood glucose measured after a
meal.
The insulin resistance index was reduced by 44.7%.
Another study which included 116 patients also with type 2 diabetes showed similar results
(Zhang Y, et.al., 2008).
In these studies, the participants had type 2 diabetes which means they were severely insulin
resistant.
There is no reason to wait until we get a serious disease before taking action.
Berberine can be used to help keep glucose metabolism healthy.

 

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References

Aronson D, Bartha P, Zinder O, Kerner A, Shitman E, Markiewicz W, Brook GJ, Levy
Y. Association between fasting glucose and C-reactive protein in middle-aged subjects.
Diabet Med. 2004 Jan;21(1):39-44.

Zhang Y, Li X, Zou D, Liu W, Yang J, Zhu N, Huo L, Wang M, Hong J, Wu P, Ren G, Ning
G. Treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia with the natural plant alkaloid berberine.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jul;93(7):2559-65.

Yin J, Xing H, Ye J. Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolism.
2008 May;57(5):712-7. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2008.01.013.

glucose metabolism support

This formula was designed to support healthy glucose metabolism and the cardiovascular system.

The research referred to below was conducted with participants who had type 2 diabetes. This does not mean that you have to have type 2 diabetes to take this formula.

It’s very important to have a healthy glucose metabolism and keep the blood glucose low. You want to take this formula and keep your glucose metabolism healthy.

Healthy glucose metabolism is important to keep your cardiovascular system healthy.

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Reduce your blood glucose level eating this snack.

Posted by on 4:52 pm Bloodsugar, Diabetes, Eating, Glucose, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Nut consumption, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

pistachio nutsYou don’t have to have diabetes to benefit from better blood sugar control.

The reviewed research showed that sometimes it doesn’t have to be very difficult(Parham M, et al. 2014).

 

The participants of this study had type 2 diabetes. One group was given 25g of pistachio nuts as snacks twice a day for 12 weeks while the other group was given a control meal without nuts.

After 12 weeks the groups were switched so the group that got the test meal now received the nuts.

The pistachio nuts reduced fasting blood glucose, HbA1c (a measurement of long term glucose control), blood pressure, BMI (body mass index) and CRP an inflammatory marker.

All this from just eating some nuts.

 

 
Parham M1, Heidari S2, Khorramirad A2, Hozoori M3, Hosseinzadeh F1, Bakhtyari L4, Vafaeimanesh J1. Effects of pistachio nut supplementation on blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized crossover trial. Rev Diabet Stud. 2014 Summer;11(2):190-6. doi: 10.1900/RDS.2014.11.190. Epub 2014 Aug 10.

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Surprising way artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance.

Posted by on 9:02 am Artificial Sweeteners, Bloodsugar, Diabetes, Diet, Eating, Glucose, Health, Insulin resistance, Tissue Recovery Blog, Type 2 diabetes, Wellness | 0 comments

Artificial sweeteners are used as an additive in both beverages, as well as food, to improve taste since most people prefer a sweet taste.
 

sweeteners picSince these sweeteners contain very few calories, they are also popular in diet beverages and diet foods. They are even used in products marketed to people with diabetes and promoted as a good alternative to sugar.

This seems to be a big mistake according to the reviewed research(Suez J, et al. 2014).
The results demonstrated that consumption of these sweeteners are causing glucose intolerance because they alter the composition of the intestinal bacterial flora in a negative way.
These results have been reproduced in both humans and mice.

The last thing you want to do is to consume a substance that will make you more glucose intolerant. This is very important for diabetics, but also for non diabetics because you don’t want to develop diabetes.

 

 

Suez J, Korem T, Zeevi D, Zilberman-Schapira G, Thaiss CA, Maza O, Israeli D, Zmora N, Gilad S, Weinberger A, Kuperman Y, Harmelin A, Kolodkin-Gal I, Shapiro H, Halpern Z, Segal E, Elinav E. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota. Nature. 2014 Sep 17. doi: 10.1038/nature13793. [Epub ahead of print]

Your gastrointestinal bacterias may influence your blood sugar.

Posted by on 8:42 am Bloodsugar, BMJ Formula, Diabetes, Eating, Insulin resistance, Probiotics, Supplements, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

A lot has been written about the bacterial flora of the gastrointestinal tract lately and how it can affect other areas of the body.
 

TabletThe reviewed research evaluated the effects of seven strains of friendly bacterias and how they may affect insulin sensitivity(Eslamparast T, et al. 2014).
 

Participants with the metabolic syndrome were given capsules containing 200 million of seven strains of friendly bacterias twice a day for 28 weeks.

Fasting blood sugar and insulin resistance improved significantly in the treatment group.

While we don’t know all the friendly bacterias yet, we know that quite a few can be beneficial to take. When you are traveling, it can be a good idea to bring a pro-biotic which does not require refrigeration since this may also help to prevent gastrointestinal problems if you are exposed to bacterias you are not used to.

 

 

 

Eslamparast T, Zamani F, Hekmatdoost A, Sharafkhah M, Eghtesad S, Malekzadeh R, Poustchi H.  Effects of synbiotic supplementation on insulin resistance in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.  Br J Nutr. 2014 Aug;112(3):438-45. doi: 10.1017/S0007114514000919. Epub 2014 May 22.

Surprising benefit of walnuts

Posted by on 11:00 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Diet, Health, Heart disease, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

Research has documented that walnuts improve cardiovascular risk factors.

The reviewed research investigated if walnuts may affect the risk of diabetes (Pan A.,et.al.,2013). 58.063 women aged 52 -77 years and also 79.893 women aged 35-52 years were followed over ten years. None of the women had Diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer at the start of the study. The consumption of walnuts and other nuts were assessed every 4 years.

The results showed that women that ate the most walnuts, 2 or more servings per week (1 serving was 28 g) had the lowest risk for Diabetes, but the ones who only ate 1-3 servings per month also showed a reduced risk compared to the women who never or rarely ate walnuts.

The women who ate other nuts also had a lower risk for Diabetes.

Nuts are both a convenient and good snack as long as you don’t have too many at one time. They have a very low glycemic index. Nuts can also be sprinkled on berries or a little bit of fruit as a healthy desert.

 

 

 

Pan A, Sun Q, Manson JE, Willett WC, Hu FB. Walnut Consumption Is Associated with Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women. J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):512-8. doi: 10.3945/jn.112.172171. Epub 2013 Feb 20.

The risk of sugar sweetened beverages

Posted by on 12:01 pm Cardiovascular Disease, Health, Health Risk, Inflammatory factor, Sugar, Sweet beverages, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

Most people believe that sweets are not healthy, and sugar sweetened beverages are associated with weight gain and also increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The reviewed research investigated the association between sugar sweetened beverages and several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (de Koning L, et al. 2012).

42,883 men were included in the study and followed for 22 years.

The results showed that the sugar sweetened beverages was significantly associated with increased triglycerides, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), lipoprotein(a) and leptin. These are inflammatory markers and other risk factors. This led to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

You can improve your health significantly just by changing the habit of drinking soft drinks.

 

 

de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption, incident coronary heart disease, and biomarkers of risk in men. Circulation. 2012 Apr 10;125(14):1735-41, S1. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.067017. Epub 2012 Mar 12.