Your Road to Wellness

Sweet beverages

Do you want to reduce your risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis?

Posted by on 8:27 am Anti-aging, Arthritis, High fructose corn syrup, Sugar, Sweet beverages | 0 comments

Fotolia,arthritisNo one, of course, wants to develop rheumatoid arthritis. You can reduce your risk to a large extent by making a small change to your habits by avoiding this item.
 

The reviewed research this is based upon was very large, and for that reason it is worth paying attention to.

Since the consumption of sugar sweetened soda has been associated with an increased risk for chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, the researchers investigated if it would play a role in developing rheumatoid arthritis (HuY, et al. 2014).

This study included women, and it was a follow up of 3,381,268 person-years.

 The results documented that the women consuming 1 or more servings of sugar sweetened soda per day had a 63 percent increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis compared with those who consumed no sugar sweetened soda, or less than 1 serving per month.

 

 

 

Hu Y, Costenbader KH, Gao X, Al-Daabil M, Sparks JA, Solomon DH, Hu FB, Karlson EW, Lu B. Sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;100(3):959-67. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086918. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

What you drink could increase your blood pressure.

Posted by on 5:52 pm Artificial Sweeteners, Blood Pressure, Bloodsugar, BMJ Formula, Diet, Fruit juice, Heart disease, High fructose corn syrup, Sugar, Sweet beverages | 0 comments

man drinking soda

A lot has been written about the effect salt may have on your blood pressure, but not much has been mentioned about the topic of the reviewed research.

In this research the results of several studies which included 409,707 participants were included (Malik AH, et al. 2014). The researchers investigated how a common habit many people have may affect their blood pressure, and that habit was drinking sugar sweetened beverages.

They found that the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages were associated with higher blood pressure leading to increased incidence of hypertension.

Comparatively few people may be aware of the health hazards of sweet soft drinks. Many also still think that a glass of fruit juice is a very healthy choice, but it is actually loaded with sugar. Keep that in mind especially now when it is summer and you want to pick up something to drink.

Water is certainly the best choice, but if you want something sparkly, use carbonated water and squeeze some lemon juice in it if you want more taste.

 

 

Malik AH1, Akram Y2, Shetty S2, Malik SS3, Yanchou Njike V4. Impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on blood pressure. Am J Cardiol. 2014 May 1;113(9):1574-80. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2014.01.437. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

If you think artificially sweetened soft drinks are healthier than sugar sweetened, you need to read this.

Posted by on 11:00 am Artificial Sweeteners, Bloodsugar, Diet, Diet, Health, Health Risk, Sweet beverages, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

It’s a common belief that artificially sweetened soft drinks are a good alternative to sugar sweetened ones. They are usually promoted as diet soft drinks, and people with Diabetes may also think it’s okay to drink this, because they don’t contain regular sugar.

The reviewed research is interesting because it compared regular sugar sweetened beverages with artificially sweetened ones, investigating the risk of type 2 diabetes (Fagherazzi G. et.al., 2013). A total of 66.118 women were followed from 1993.

The women who were in the highest quartiles of consumption of both beverages were at increased risk of type II diabetes. The artificially sweetened beverages were not any better at all.

Other studies have shown that people who drink artificially sweetened soft drinks don’t lose any more weight either. If you want something sparkly, try sparkling water instead.

 

 

 

 

Fagherazzi G, Vilier A, Saes Sartorelli D, Lajous M, Balkau B, Clavel-Chapelon F. Consumption of artificially and sugar-sweetened beverages and incident type 2 diabetes in the Etude Epidemiologique aupres des femmes de la Mutuelle Generale de l’Education Nationale-European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Mar;97(3):517-23. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.050997. Epub 2013 Jan 30.

The risk of sugar sweetened beverages

Posted by on 12:01 pm Cardiovascular Disease, Health, Health Risk, Inflammatory factor, Sugar, Sweet beverages, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

Most people believe that sweets are not healthy, and sugar sweetened beverages are associated with weight gain and also increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The reviewed research investigated the association between sugar sweetened beverages and several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (de Koning L, et al. 2012).

42,883 men were included in the study and followed for 22 years.

The results showed that the sugar sweetened beverages was significantly associated with increased triglycerides, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), lipoprotein(a) and leptin. These are inflammatory markers and other risk factors. This led to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

You can improve your health significantly just by changing the habit of drinking soft drinks.

 

 

de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption, incident coronary heart disease, and biomarkers of risk in men. Circulation. 2012 Apr 10;125(14):1735-41, S1. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.067017. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

Be aware of what you drink

Posted by on 1:44 pm Calories, Fructose, High fructose corn syrup, Hot Beverages, Insulin resistance, Sugar, Sweet beverages, Type 2 diabetes, Weight gain | 1 comment

What you drink can affect you in many ways.

High fructose corn syrup, which commonly is added to both food and beverages, favors fat metabolism even more that regular glucose.

When we ingest fructose we get less feedback on when we are full, because fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or affect leptin production, both of which are key factors in the regulation of food intake. Fructose may for that reason result in over consumption of calories and lead to weight gain (Bray GA, et al. 2004). By drinking sweet beverages, it is extremely easy to consume more calories than we need. A large container of a sweet beverage may even amount to as many calories as in a whole meal.

Sugar sweetened beverages are also a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (Palmer JR, et al, 2008). This was documented in a study including 43,960 women. These types of beverages are often marketed as healthy juices and natural fruit drinks, with the intention of making the product sound healthy to the consumer.

A recent study showed that when fructose was consumed, the lipogenisis which is the conversion of sugar to fat was twice as great as when it was absent, leading to increased triglyceride levels (Parks E.J. et al, 2008)

I have for a long time observed that when patients change their eating habits from eating high glycemic index meals (which means foods that elevate the blood sugar high), to low glycemic index meals (which are foods which rather stabilize the blood sugar at a good level instead of elevating it really high), both triglycerides total cholesterol, and LDL, the bad cholesterol all go down substantially. The good cholesterol HDL, however, usually goes up.

According to the research referenced here, you need to pay close attention to what you drink because beverages can be a big source of sugar elevating your blood sugar and lead to all the negative effects from that. Not only can it make you gain weight, but it is also a risk factor for diabetes, because it can contribute to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance which is caused by high glycemic index food and drinks (sweets), weight gain, and lack of exercise can lead to diabetes and can put you at risk for many chronic diseases. It affects your eyes, heart, and brain, as well as other tissue, because it affects the production of inflammatory chemicals in the body which again is a risk factor for these types of conditions.

References:

  1. Bray GA, Nielsen SJ, et al. Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;79(4):537-43.
  2. Palmer JR, Boggs DA, et al.Sugar-sweetened beverages and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in African American women.Arch Intern Med. 2008 Jul 28; 168(14): 1487-92.
  3. Parks EJ, Skokan LE, et al.Dietary sugars stimulate fatty acid synthesis in adults.J Nutr. 2008 Jun; 138 (6):1039-46