Your Road to Wellness

Stress

Decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk by affecting this nerve

Posted by on 6:35 pm Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Disease, General Health, Health Risk, Risk of death, Stay healthy, Stress | 0 comments

You don’t need any equipment or take any pills to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk.

When a broad range of indicators of vagal function were tested, the researchers of the following study showed that decreased vagal function is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality (Thayer JF, Lane RD, 2007).

The vagus nerve–which is the 10th cranial nerve–is involved in numerous functions and has a big impact on how we feel and function.

How can we affect the vagus nerve?

You can activate the vagus nerve by breathing at a rate of 6 breaths per minute.

Slow and deep breathing with equal duration of inhalation and exhalation for 5 minutes was found to significantly decrease systolic blood pressure (Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, 2011).

It does not take much time to see the benefits from implementing this type of breathing, you notice a difference in the way you feel within some few minutes.

This is diaphragmatic breathing where you see your abdomen rising when you breathe in and lowering as you breathe out.

With some practice you will automatically breathe this way most of the the time, which will make you more relaxed.

References

Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, Madanmohan.Immediate effect of sukha pranayama on cardiovascular variables in patients of hypertension.Int J Yoga Therap. 2011;(21):73-6.

Thayer JF, Lane RD.The role of vagal function in the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality.Biol Psychol. 2007 Feb;74(2):224-42.

 

Are you feeling stressed?  With the Stressed to Relaxed in 60 Seconds program, you will learn how to literally feel more relaxed and also feel less pain and stiffness in your neck in just 60 seconds

This is not difficult and it does not require expensive equipment. You can, without a doubt, do this. 

Click here to find out more!

Feel more relaxed, improve your focus and be more stress resistant by controlling your breathing.

Posted by on 8:43 am Blood Pressure, Breathing, General Health, Happiness, Health, Pain, Research, Stress | 0 comments

The way you breathe has a strong effect on how you feel and function. Research has shown that the amount of times you breath and also how you breathe is important.

The following study included 47 healthy college students which implemented different breathing patterns (Lin IM, et., al., 2014). Anxiety and relaxation levels were measured as well as heart rate variability (HRV).

The reason HRV was measured is because research has shown a relationship between low HRV and worsening of depression or anxiety. A low HRV has even been associated with an increased risk of death and cardiovascular disease. People who have a high HRV may have greater cardiovascular fitness and be more resilient to stress.

In this study the researchers showed that breathing at a rate of 5.5 breaths per minute and with an equal time used to breathe in and out resulted in a higher HRV and an increased feeling of relaxation. The other breathing patterns were not as effective.

A breathing frequency of 6 breaths per minute has been the frequency found to be most effective in most of the studies.

Using your diaphragm when breathing is also important. Implementing that with slow breathing increased sustained attention and lowered cortisol levels–cortisol is a stress hormone– in another study (Ma X, et.al., 2017).

When you use your diaphragm in breathing, you will see your abdomen raising when you breathe in.

This type of breathing has even shown to improve sleep when practiced before bed time (Tsai HJ,et.al., 2015).

 

References

Lin IM, Tai LY, Fan SY,Breathing at a rate of 5.5 breaths per minute with equal inhalation-to-exhalation ratio increases heart rate variability, Int J Psychophysiol. 2014 Mar;91(3):206-11.

Ma X, Yue ZQ, Gong ZQ, Zhang H, Duan NY, Shi YT, Wei GX, Li YF, The Effect of Diaphragmatic Breathing on Attention, Negative Affect and Stress in Healthy Adults,Front Psychol. 2017 Jun 6;8:874. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00874.

Tsai HJ1, Kuo TB, Lee GS, Yang CC,Efficacy of paced breathing for insomnia: enhances vagal activity and improves sleep qualityPsychophysiology. 2015 Mar;52(3):388-96. doi: 10.1111/psyp.12333.

 

 

Are you feeling stressed?  With the Stressed to Relaxed in 60 Seconds program, you will learn how to literally feel more relaxed and also feel less pain and stiffness in your neck in just 60 seconds

This is not difficult and it does not require expensive equipment. You can, without a doubt, do this. 

Click here to find out more!

Can Omega 3 Fatty Acids Affect Your Mood?

Posted by on 11:42 am Body fat, Fish Oil, General Health, Omega-3, fish oil, Stay healthy, Stress, Wellness, Womens health | 0 comments

Omega 3 fatty acids have been demonstrated to significantly influence the nervous system and affect brain structures.

Can omega 3 fat also impact the way you feel emotionally?

This was evaluated in young adults with depressive symptoms by giving them 1.4 g of EPA and DHA, the active ingredients of omega 3 fat, or a placebo (Ginty AT, Conclin SM, 2015).

The participants took the omega 3 fatty acids for 21 days, and the results showed a significant difference between the treatment group and the placebo group.

67% of the participant taking the omega 3 fatty acids no longer met the criteria for being depressed, while only 20% in the placebo group were no longer depressed.

 

When medical students were given either 2085 mg of EPA and 348 mg of DHA or a placebo, the ones who received the omega 3 fatty acids experienced a 20% reduction in anxiety symptoms and a 14% reduction in IL-6 and TNF-alpha, both markers of inflammation (Kiecolt-Glaser JK et.al., 2011).

 

The fatty acid composition of the red blood cells in patients with recurrent major depression was found to be significantly lower in the patients compared to the control group without depression ( Assies J, et.al., 2010).

 

According to these studies, just by taking some capsules of a high-quality omega 3 fish oil daily, you should see a positive effect on your mood.

 

References

Assies J, Pouwer F, Lok A, Mocking RJ, Bockting CL, Visser I, Abeling NG, Duran M, Schene AH Plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid patterns in patients with recurrent depression: a matched case-control study. PLoS One. 2010 May 14;5(5):e10635.

Ginty AT, Conklin SM. Short-term supplementation of acute long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may alter depression status and decrease symptomology among young adults with depression: A preliminary randomized and placebo controlled trial.
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Sep 30;229(1-2):485-9.

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Belury MA, Andridge R, Malarkey WB, Glaser R. Omega-3 supplementation lowers inflammation and anxiety in medical students: a randomized controlled trial. Brain Behav Immun. 2011 Nov;25(8):1725-34.

 

Better Fish Oil

The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega 3 fatty acids are well known. Most people that eat a western diet can benefit from increasing the intake of Omega 3 fatty acid since their diet usually contains too much Omega 6 from vegetable oils and saturated fat from dairy and other animal sources

Read more.. 

Improve Your Memory By Reducing Oxidative Stress

Posted by on 4:43 pm Brain, Memory, Stress | 0 comments

Oxidative stress occurs when there are too many oxidants and not enough antioxidants to protect the tissue from damage.

Therefore, oxidative stress been recognized as playing a major role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (Manoharan S, et.al., 2016, Hroudova J, et.al., 2014, Chen X, et.al., 2012).

All tissue including nerves are exposed to free radicals from the body’s own metabolism as well as from the outer environment.

It has been found that cognitive function positively correlates with antioxidant levels in patients with mild cognitive impairment (Baldeiras I, et.al., 2008). This research also shows that most of the oxidative changes found in mild Alzheimer’s disease are already present in mild cognitive impairment. The progression of Alzheimer’s disease might be accompanied by antioxidant depletion.

Neurons which are the major cells of the nervous system are susceptible to direct injury from free radicals. But also, they are indirectly susceptible. Oxidative stress activates mechanisms that result in inflammation causing additional damage (Wang JY, et.al., 2006).

I think you agree that it is crucial to have good antioxidant protection to protect your nervous system from injury.

Glutathione is an important antioxidant the body is producing which is present in the brain and other tissue.

Research has demonstrated that increased cellular levels of glutathione protect neurons against damage from oxidation. It also protects the loss of mitochondrial function (Boyd-Kimball D, et.al., 2005). The mitochondria is the energy producing entity of the cell and is very important.

Neuronal death has been associated with glutathione depletion in nerve cells (Abramov AY, et.al., 2003).

Glutathione is a very effective antioxidant. But, there is one problem. The body is producing less of it as we get older. We need more protection as we get older, not less.

There is, however, an effective way to supply glutathione to your cells, and that is by using S-Acetyl Glutathione.

S-Acetyl Glutathione is the only form of glutathione that has been found to get into the cells where it is needed (Caccaiatore I, et.al., 2010). This could provide you with valuable protection.


References:

Manoharan, S., Guillemin, G. J., Abiramasundari, R. S., Essa, M. M., Akbar, M., & Akbar, M. D. (2016). The role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease: a mini reviewOxidative medicine and cellular longevity2016.

Hroudová, J., Singh, N., & Fišar, Z. (2014). Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer’s diseaseBioMed research international2014.

Chen, X., Guo, C., & Kong, J. (2012). Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseasesNeural regeneration research7(5), 376.

Baldeiras, I., Santana, I., Proença, M. T., Garrucho, M. H., Pascoal, R., Rodrigues, A., … & Oliveira, C. R. (2008). Peripheral oxidative damage in mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease15(1), 117-128.

Wang, J. Y., Wen, L. L., Huang, Y. N., Chen, Y. T., & Ku, M. C. (2006). Dual effects of antioxidants in neurodegeneration: direct neuroprotection against oxidative stress and indirect protection via suppression of gliamediated inflammation. Current pharmaceutical design12(27), 3521-3533.

Boyd‐Kimball, D., Sultana, R., Abdul, H. M., & Butterfield, D. A. (2005). γ‐glutamylcysteine ethyl ester‐induced up‐regulation of glutathione protects neurons against Aβ (1–42)‐mediated oxidative stress and neurotoxicity: Implications for Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of neuroscience research79(5), 700-706.


EFFECTIVE S-ACETYL GLUTATHIONE

Glutathione is your primary defense against aging.

It’s a very effective antioxidant that the body makes to protect itself from free radical damage (oxidative stress). You can take this to help repair cells that are damaged by stress, radiation, pollution, infection, and other illnesses.

Research has established increased oxidative damage from lipid peroxidation as well as protein, DNA and RNA oxidation in areas of the brain has as early events in Alzheimer’s disease (Markesberry WR, Lovell MA, 2007).

BUY NOW

Can Certain Food Cause Stress?

Posted by on 12:55 am Eating, Stress | 0 comments

Some people eat when they get stressed and nervous to calm themselves down, but can certain food cause stress?

That’s what this research investigated (Gibson EL, et.al., 1999).
Cortisol was measured in the saliva which means it was free cortisol, that’s the part of the hormone that will have an effect, since some are protein bound, and is not free to act on the tissue.

The cortisol was measured before and after a high protein (35% of total calories) meal and after a low protein(5% of total calories) meal in healthy participants.

The results showed a significant increase in cortisol after the high protein meal, but not after the low protein meal.

The increase in cortisol also correlated with poor psychological well-being.

Think of food as cell signaling compounds, they do a lot more than only provide energy.

A plant-based, vegan diet is low in protein, and this is one more reason why it makes good sense.

There has never been documented any benefits by eating more protein than we need, and research shows that we don’t need that much.

Reference:

Gibson, E. L., Checkley, S., Papadopoulos, A., Poon, L., Daley, S., & Wardle, J. (1999). Increased salivary cortisol reliably induced by a protein-rich midday meal. Psychosomatic medicine61(2), 214-224.

Learn To Eat Program:

Recommendations that work. Reduce stress with the food you eat. This is not a regular diet program.