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magnesium

What is an easy way to reduce calcification of your arteries?

Posted by on 9:00 am BMJ Formula, Cardiovascular Disease, Health, Health Risk, magnesium, Supplements | 0 comments

Artery calcification

 

Most people get some degree of buildup, calcification of their arteries as they get older which is
not a good thing.
To stay healthy and live longer, it is crucial to have a good blood supply to all tissue, because that
is how we get nutrients and oxygen to the tissue.
We have all had the experience of a temporary restriction of the blood flow to an arm or a leg by
unknowingly laying in a position that cut off the circulation. It does not feel good.
If the heart muscle is not getting enough blood, we get a heart attack.
We know that eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly is important, but what else can you
do?
The following study investigated if magnesium may prevent calcification of the coronary arteries
(Hruby A, et al, 2014).
2,695 participants with an average age of 53 years who were free of cardiovascular disease
underwent Multi-Detector Computed Tomography of the heart and abdomen.
Multiple risk factors were accounted for in the evaluation.
Even the intake of vitamin K which has shown to help prevent artery calcification was accounted for.

 

 

The researchers found that the odds of having any coronary artery calcification were 58%
lower and having any abdominal aortic calcification were 34% lower, in those with the
highest compared to those with the lowest magnesium intake.

The authors said this may play a contributing role in magnesium’s protective associations in
stroke and fatal coronary heart disease.

When supplementing with magnesium, an amino acid chelate like magnesium glycinate is
recommended. The most common form of magnesium used in supplements is magnesium
oxide which is not absorbed well and can cause gastrointestinal irritation.

Magnesium is also important for many other reasons such as energy production and bone
formation. Ideally, it is better to combine magnesium with other important minerals since
supplementing with only one may cause an imbalance, and the other minerals are also
important for a variety of reasons.

Reference

Adela Hruby, Christopher J O’Donnell, Paul F Jacques, James B Meigs, Udo Hoffmann, Nicola
M McKeown, Magnesium Intake Is Inversely Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification: The
Framingham Heart Study,JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Jan;7(1):59-69.

 

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This mineral can influence muscle strength, be sure you get enough of it!

Posted by on 9:15 am BMJ Formula, General Health, Intensity Training, Joint health, magnesium, Muscles, Supplements | 0 comments

This mineral can influence muscle strength, be sure you get enough of it!

 

 

We lose minerals when we perspire. Hot weather and exercise will for that reason make us lose
more.

Some minerals are also more important than others. Magnesium is one of the most important
ones and many people don’t get enough of it.

Magnesium is involved in energy metabolism and numerous enzymatic reactions.

 

 

Athletes often don’t get enough magnesium to compensate for what they lose. This study investigated the impact magnesium can have on muscle strength in elite male
basketball, handball, and volleyball players (Santos DA, et. al, 2011).

It was found that the intake of magnesium was directly associated with maximal isometric
trunk flexion, rotation, and handgrip strength.

Magnesium does not only work for athletes.
The following research included 1138 men and women with an average age of 66.7 years
(Dominguez LJ, et.al., 2006).

The participants were evaluated by testing grip strength, lower-leg muscle power, knee
extension torque, and ankle extension isometric strength.

The researchers found that blood levels of magnesium were significantly associated with
muscle strength and performance as evaluated with the above tests.

 

strength

 

Magnesium in the form of an amino acid chelate is a good choice since it is both well tolerated
and better absorbed than the more common form of magnesium oxide which can cause GI
irritation.

References:

Dominguez LJ, Barbagallo M, Lauretani F, Bandinelli S, Bos A, Corsi AM, Simonsick EM,
Ferrucci L. Magnesium and muscle performance in older persons: the InCHIANTI study. Am J
Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):419-26.
Santos DA, Matias CN, Monteiro CP, Silva AM, Rocha PM, Minderico CS, Bettencourt Sardinha
L, Laires MJ. Magnesium intake is associated with strength performance in elite basketball,
handball and volleyball players. Magnes Res. 2011 Dec;24(4):215-9.

 

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Magnesium is Even More Important than We Used to Think

Posted by on 9:24 pm Brain, Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Gastrointestinal Health, General Health, Health, magnesium, Vitamin D | 0 comments

Research is documenting how functions, organs, and nutrients are all interconnected. We cannot look at anything as separate entities anymore if we are going to get an accurate impression of what happens physiologically from the input of nutrient intake as well as exercise. The GI tract is one example where researchers have documented communication between the GI tract and the brain. We know the brain also communicates with the GI tract.

Intestinal absorption and subsequent metabolism of a nutrient, to a certain extent, is dependent on the availability of other nutrients.

The following research is showing us how the intake and the impact of magnesium are affecting vitamin D levels.

Image result for magnesium

Magnesium assists in the activation of vitamin D because all of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium (Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS, 2018).

Deficiency in either of these nutrients is reported to be associated with skeletal deformities, cardiovascular diseases, and the metabolic syndrome.

The next study indicates the same thing. The researchers found that higher intake of magnesium resulted in higher blood levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which is the most reliable way to measure vitamin D status (Deng X, et.al., 2013).

They also found associations of serum 25(OH)D with mortality, particularly due to cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer, and they were modified by magnesium intake. Magnesium has shown to reduce calcification of the arteries (Hruby A, et.al., 2014).

This means that if you must take a very high amount of vitamin D to keep your vitamin D level in a good range, you most likely need magnesium. If you take enough magnesium in a well-absorbed form, you should not need to take high amounts of vitamin D to keep it at a good level. What we also learn from research like this, is how important it is to take magnesium or any of the other common minerals in a formula that combines these minerals, since they affect each other. Amino acid chelates are the best form to take minerals because they are better absorbed and better tolerated. They don’t cause gastrointestinal irritation.

 

 

References
Deng X, Song Y, Manson JE, Signorello LB, Zhang SM, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Seidner DL, Dai Q. Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III. BMC Med. 2013 Aug 27;11:187.

Hruby A1, O’Donnell CJ2, Jacques PF1, Meigs JB3, Hoffmann U4, McKeown NM5. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Jan;7(1):59-69.

Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS. Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2018 Mar 1;118(3):181-189.

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