Your Road to Wellness

Low glycemic meals

Can nuts reduce the formation of vascular plaque?

Posted by on 9:54 pm Antioxidents, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, Health, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Plaque formation in the vascular system is something we are better off without, not only because it will increase cardiovascular risk, but we need good blood circulation to all tissue we have. Blood vessels in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients have, for example, been found to have a lot of plaque.

What can we do to help reduce plaque formation?

A high nutrient, low-glycemic index plant-based diet is a good choice, but is it possible to only add one food, and see a significant reduction in vascular plaque?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.

They measured the internal carotid intima-media thickness and plaque height using ultrasound at the start and after an average follow up of 2.4 years(Sala-Vila A, et.al, 2014).

Carotid intima-media thickness is the thickness of the inner layer of the blood vessel.

The participants consumed a Mediterranean diet. One group added either virgin olive oil or 30 grams of nuts every day to their diet. The control group consumed a low fat diet.

These were the results:

Compared with the control diet, consumption of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts was associated with delayed progression of  intima-media thickness and plaque.

It is also interesting that there were no changes after the Mediterranean diet with the added virgin olive oil.

What could be the reason for that?

A good assumption would be that nuts contain nutrients the olive oil is missing, especially antioxidants.

Oil even if it is a good oil is not as good as natural unprocessed food.

30 grams of nuts is only one big handful.

Get in the habit of reducing your intake of grains and use some nuts instead. That will work a lot better for you (unless you are allergic to nuts). 

Reference

Sala-Vila A, Romero-Mamani ES, Gilabert R, Núñez I, de la Torre R, Corella D, Ruiz-Gutiérrez V, López-Sabater MC, Pintó X, Rekondo J, Martínez-González MÁ, Estruch R, Ros E.Changes in ultrasound-assessed carotid intima-media thickness and plaque with a Mediterranean diet: a substudy of the PREDIMED trial.Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):439-45.

 

 

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What is the best predictor of aging?

Posted by on 3:10 am Anti-Aging, Diet, Eating, Health, Inflammation, Low glycemic meals, Vegetables | 0 comments

 

Chronological and physiological age is not the same.

You can be younger than your actual years or you can be older. This depends a lot on your diet and lifestyle.

The referenced research was conducted to figure out the most important drivers for successful aging (Arai Y, et.al., 2015). This is important because you don’t want to just live for a long time, you want to stay healthy as you get older.

1554 individuals were included in the study, and 684 were 100-105 years old and 105-109 years old. There were also 536 who were 85-99 year old and some children of the 100-105 years old.

The researchers looked at multiple biomarkers and this is what they found.

Inflammation predicted all-cause mortality in the 85-99 years old and in the 105-109 years old.

Inflammation also predicted capability and cognition in 105-109 year olds better than chronologic age.

The inflammation score was also lower in the children of these individuals compared to age-matched controls.

if you want to function well  as you get older, Inflammation is the most important factor to keep low. 

It is important to keep in mind that oxidative stress is also involved in inflammation.

Oxidative stress due to oxidant/antioxidant imbalance, and also due to environmental oxidants is an important component during inflammation and respiratory diseases, asthma being one of those conditions (Biswas SK, Rahman I, 2009).

This is what you can do to keep inflammation low.  Implement a high nutrient, low glycemic index, plant based diet.

Take a well absorbed form of  Curcumin and Boron. Both of these compounds have shown to reduce inflammation.

Take S-Acetyl Glutathione which is a form of Glutathione shown to get into the cells. Glutathione is the body’s most effective protection against free radical damage. It also regulates the immune function.

References

Arai Y1, Martin-Ruiz CM, Takayama M, Abe Y, Takebayashi T, Koyasu S, Suematsu M, Hirose N, von Zglinicki T,Inflammation, but not Telomere length, predicts successful ageing at extreme old age: A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians.EBioMedicine. 2015 Jul 29;2(10):1549-58.

Biswas SK, Rahman I.Environmental toxicity, redox signaling and lung inflammation: The role of glutathioneMol Aspects Med. 2009 Feb-Apr;30(1-2):60-76.

 

 

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Carbohydrates that improve insulin sensitivity

Posted by on 10:31 pm Bloodsugar, Diabetes, Glucose, Low glycemic meals | 0 comments

 

All carbohydrates are not the same.  Making a few changes will make a big difference.

When normal participants in this study ate 50 g of either 8 varieties of dried legumes (beans, lentils) or 24 common foods drawn from grains, cereals and pasta, breakfast cereals, biscuits and tuberous vegetables, this is what happened (Jenkins DJ, et al. 1980).

The participants who ate the beans had at least an average of 45% lower rise in blood glucose than those who ate the other foods.

This is not the only thing that you can expect.

Half a cup of pinto beans a day for 8 weeks significantly reduced triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in study participants when compared to eating black-eyed peas or carrots (Winham DM, et al. 2007).

This is what you should do to reduce your blood glucose and improve your glucose insulin metabolism and improve markers for heart disease.

Every time you would eat grains, instead eat beans or lentils.
This is not difficult, it is a way to do this which makes it simple.

Next time I will explain how you also can use three ingredients to significantly lower you blood glucose.

 

Learn to Eat:  Recommendations that work. This is not a regular diet program.

 

Jenkins DJ, Wolever TM, Taylor RH, Barker HM, Fielden H. Exceptionally low blood glucose response to dried beans: comparison with other carbohydrate foods. Br Med J. 1980 Aug 30;281(6240):578-80.
Winham DM, Hutchins AM, Johnston CS. Pinto bean consumption reduces biomarkers for heart disease risk. J Am Coll Nutr. 2007 Jun;26(3):243-9.

Elevated levels of common lab test associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's.

Posted by on 6:46 pm Brain, Cognition, Dementia, General Health, Glucose, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals | 0 comments

img_salad_steakThere is no single test available at the time to specifically diagnose Alzheimer’s disease or to only show the risk for it. New research, however, indicates that a common test like fasting glucose may tell us something about the risk (Burns CM, et al. 2014).

When regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in brain regions usually affected by Alzheimer disease was measured, a correlation with fasting glucose levels was found. Higher fasting glucose levels in cognitively normal, non diabetic adults were correlated with lower regional cerebral metabolic rate.

This means that higher fasting glucose levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease and increase the risk for this disease.

What is the solution? A diet consisting of high nutrient, low glycemic index food, exercise and meditation for better handling of stress. This type of lifestyle will also reduce the risk for all other chronic conditions as well.

 

 

 

Burns CM1, Chen K, Kaszniak AW, Lee W, Alexander GE, Bandy D, Fleisher AS, Caselli RJ, Reiman EM.Higher serum glucose levels are associated with cerebral hypometabolism in Alzheimer regions. Neurology. 2013 Apr 23;80(17):1557-64. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31828f17de. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

What effects brain loss as you get older?

Posted by on 10:42 am Anti-aging, Brain, Cognition, Dementia, Exercise, General Health, Glucose, Low glycemic meals, Memory, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

effects on the brainAs we get older we gradually experience a certain degree of brain atrophy. The rate of which the brain volume is changing is, however, not the same for everyone. The good news is that there is something you can do to slow down this process.

An Austrian study of 201 participants evaluated brain volume changes over 6 years. Using MRI scans, it was documented that the participants with higher Hemoglobin A1c levels also had a higher rate of brain atrophy (Enzinger C, et al. 2005).
Hemoglobin A1c is a measurement of long term glucose control.

The participants with high alcohol intake also lost brain volume faster, and so did the ones with a high body mass index.

As you can see, these are things you can do something about. If you get into the habit of eating low glycemic index meals it will help to make you more insulin sensitive and lower Hemoglobin A1c. If you also add some exercise to that, it will help even more.

If you find this interesting I believe you will find the information in The Learn to Eat Planvery interesting also.

 

 

Enzinger C1, Fazekas F, Matthews PM, Ropele S, Schmidt H, Smith S, Schmidt R. Risk factors for progression of brain atrophy in aging: six-year follow-up of normal subjects. Neurology. 2005 May 24;64(10):1704-11.

Could gluten cause problems for everybody?

Posted by on 8:17 am Eating, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

3d render of digestive systemThere is more and more information published every day on adverse reactions to gluten.

We used to believe that if you did not have celiac disease, you would not have any issues with gluten. This does not seem to be true since there are different degrees of gluten intolerance. People who have celiac disease just have a very severe reaction to it.

A gastroenterologist and researcher at Harvard University has published a very interesting article on this subject(Fasano,A,2011).

The intestinal mucosa act as a barrier to protect us from pathogens and other particles that are not supposed to be absorbed into the blood. This is called intestinal permeability. Dr. Fasano explains that gliadin (a protein found in gluten) trigger IL-8 (an inflammatory cytokine) leading to recruitment of neutrophils. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell which are activated as a part of the body’s defense mechanism.

Gliadin increases intestinal permeability through the release of a substance called zonulin. When the intestinal permeability increases we may absorb both pathogens (bacterias) and larger proteins not intended to be absorbed, triggering an inflammatory response.

Gliadin also interacts with macrophages, another type of white blood cell. This establishes an inflammatory environment in the intestinal mucosa. Depending on genetic predisposition, we will then experience a more or less severe reaction. This may, for example, trigger an autoimmune response in someone who is predisposed to that.

In other words, it looks like gluten is triggering an inflammatory response in everybody, but because we don’t have exactly the same genes, we will not have exactly the same reaction.

Gluten is found in common grains, but gluten free grains are not without problems either because they elevate the blood glucose high.

There are; however, solutions to this which you will find in the Learn to Eat program.

 

 

 Fasano A.  Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.