Your Road to Wellness

The Learn to Eat Plan

What type of protein is best if you want to live longer?

Posted by on 7:32 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health Risk, Nut consumption, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

Does the source of protein really matter as long as we get an adequate supply?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.  85 013 women and 46 329 men, a total of 131342 participants were included in this research (Song M, et.al., 2016).

They examined the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality.

The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein  and 4% for plant protein.

The researchers concluded that high animal protein intake was positively associated with cardiovascular mortality, and high plant protein intake was inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, especially among individuals with at least 1 lifestyle risk factor.

The worst form of protein was processed red meat.

If you want to improve your odds of living longer, plant protein is what you should eat.

A common trait for populations known to live longer, is that they eat very little animal protein, they only do it occasionally.

Research has also documented that we don’t need a lot of protein. It’s a common misconception that we need a Iot, most people in the western world unless they are vegetarians, eat more protein than they need.

If you eat a plant based diet which includes beans, nuts and seeds, you will not get more protein than you need, but you will get enough.

Reference

Song M, Fung TT, Hu FB, Willett WC, Longo VD, Chan AT, Giovannucci EL, Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 1;176(10):1453-1463.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

Does milk help prevent fractures?

Posted by on 9:28 am Anti-aging, Bone density, bone loss, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Milk is by most people believed to help support bone formation and reduce the risk for fractures, but is that true?

The following research investigated milk intake and the risk of mortality and fractures in women and men (Michaelsson K, et.al., 2014).

This study was done in Sweden and included 61,433 women and 45,339 men. The average follow up for the women was 20.1 year and for the men 11.2 years.

High milk intake was associated with higher mortality for both women and men, and with a higher fracture

incidence in women.

It’s common to recommend milk for teenagers to promote increased bone mass.

To determine whether milk consumption during teenage years influences the risk of hip fracture in older adults, the researchers of this study included both women and men and did 22 years of follow-up (Feskanich D, et.al., 2014).

After controlling for known risk factors and current milk consumption, each additional glass of milk per day during teenage years was associated with a significant 9% higher risk of hip fracture in men.

It was concluded that greater milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults.

These studies were population studies using food frequency questionnaires which is not as accurate as double blinded research comparing 2 groups.

However, when the research includes large population groups and both show the same results, it’s worthwhile to pay attention to the results.

References

Michaëlsson K, Wolk A, Langenskiöld S, Basu S, Warensjö Lemming E, Melhus H, Byberg L. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies.BMJ. 2014 Oct 28;349:g6015.

Feskanich D, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Frazier AL, Willett WC. Milk consumption during teenage years and risk of hip fractures in older adults. JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Jan;168(1):54-60.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

Your blood glucose level affects the health of your blood vessels.

Posted by on 9:49 am Bloodsugar, Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Glucose, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

Everybody agrees that to be able to function well and live a long life, we need good blood circulation. This necessitates a healthy vascular system.

Your vascular system is especially important for your heart, brain, and the rest of your body because the blood delivers nutrients and oxygen. Without a supply of nutrients, the tissue will degenerate. So what can you do to keep your vascular system healthy?

Books can be written on that topic, but here is a simple strategy you can implement that can make a big difference.

First, since most of us eat several meals daily and the after effect of a meal can have a pronounced effect on your blood vessels, think about how the meal will affect your blood glucose level.

The reason you should be concerned with this is that high glucose levels after a meal and insulin resistance cause damage to the endothelium–the inner layer of the blood vessel wall (Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM, 2017).

Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by decreased release of nitric oxide, increased oxidative stress, increased production of inflammatory factors, and impaired endothelial repair.

This is one of the reasons you can end up with atherosclerosis and reduced blood circulation.

Since one of the reasons for endothelial function can be that the blood glucose level after a meal is too high, many are now recommending low carbohydrate meals. This is done as an attempt to lower the blood glucose.

This, however, may not be the the best strategy.

Research to date suggests that diets that are low in carbohydrates may negatively impact vascular endothelial function (Jovanovski E, et.al., 2015).

It appears that it is more favourable to maintain the carbohydrate intake and instead use low glycemic index foods. This generates more benefits for the vascular system.

An easy way to do that is to add some beans or lentils to the meal and reduce the amount of a higher glycemic index item.

References

Shi Y, Vanhoutte PM.Macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes.J Diabetes. 2017 May;9(5):434-449.

Jovanovski E, Zurbau A, Vuksan V, Carbohydrates and endothelial function: is a low-carbohydrate diet or a low-glycemic index diet favourable for vascular health?Clin Nutr Res. 2015 Apr;4(2):69-75.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

 

Can nuts reduce the formation of vascular plaque?

Posted by on 9:54 pm Antioxidents, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, Health, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Plaque formation in the vascular system is something we are better off without, not only because it will increase cardiovascular risk, but we need good blood circulation to all tissue we have. Blood vessels in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients have, for example, been found to have a lot of plaque.

What can we do to help reduce plaque formation?

A high nutrient, low-glycemic index plant-based diet is a good choice, but is it possible to only add one food, and see a significant reduction in vascular plaque?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.

They measured the internal carotid intima-media thickness and plaque height using ultrasound at the start and after an average follow up of 2.4 years(Sala-Vila A, et.al, 2014).

Carotid intima-media thickness is the thickness of the inner layer of the blood vessel.

The participants consumed a Mediterranean diet. One group added either virgin olive oil or 30 grams of nuts every day to their diet. The control group consumed a low fat diet.

These were the results:

Compared with the control diet, consumption of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts was associated with delayed progression of  intima-media thickness and plaque.

It is also interesting that there were no changes after the Mediterranean diet with the added virgin olive oil.

What could be the reason for that?

A good assumption would be that nuts contain nutrients the olive oil is missing, especially antioxidants.

Oil even if it is a good oil is not as good as natural unprocessed food.

30 grams of nuts is only one big handful.

Get in the habit of reducing your intake of grains and use some nuts instead. That will work a lot better for you (unless you are allergic to nuts). 

Reference

Sala-Vila A, Romero-Mamani ES, Gilabert R, Núñez I, de la Torre R, Corella D, Ruiz-Gutiérrez V, López-Sabater MC, Pintó X, Rekondo J, Martínez-González MÁ, Estruch R, Ros E.Changes in ultrasound-assessed carotid intima-media thickness and plaque with a Mediterranean diet: a substudy of the PREDIMED trial.Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):439-45.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

Osteoporosis: Chronic inflammation is also associated with osteoporosis.

Posted by on 5:34 pm Bone density, bone loss, Inflammation, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

It has been known for a while that chronic inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis will increase the risk for bone loss.

But what about chronic low grade inflammation?

There is now more and more evidence that low grade inflammation will also increase bone loss.

The authors of this paper state that the modern diet promotes inflammation and weight gain and will suppress osteoblastogenisis (Ilich JC, et al. 2014). Bone is constantly remodeled; osteoclasts will break down old bone, while osteoblasts will stimulate new bone formation.

As we get older there is a tendency to get more inflammatory, and this can increase the risk for osteoporosis (Ginaldi L, et al. 2005). Osteoporosis makes us more prone to fractures.

The good news is that you can do something to prevent this.

A huge study, which included 40,644 men and 34,947 women, with an average follow up time of 14.2 years, showed that the participants with zero fruit and vegetables intake had 88% higher rate of hip fracture compared with those consuming 5 servings per day (Byberg L, et al. 2015).

A high nutrient, low glycemic index diet can be very effective in lowering inflammation.

 

Learn to Eat:  Recommendations that work. This is not a regular diet program.

 

Byberg L, Bellavia A, Orsini N, Wolk A, Michaëlsson K. Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of hip fracture: a cohort study of Swedish men and women. J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Jun;30(6):976-84. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.2384.
Ginaldi L, Di Benedetto MC, De Martinis M. Osteoporosis, inflammation and ageing. Immun Ageing. 2005 Nov 4;2:14.
Ilich JZ, Kelly OJ, Kim Y, Spicer MT. Low-grade chronic inflammation perpetuated by modern diet as a promoter of obesity and osteoporosis. Arh Hig Rada Toksikol. 2014 Jun;65(2):139-48. doi: 10.2478/10004-1254-65-2014-2541.