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Your Road to Wellness

The Learn to Eat Plan

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low fat diet?

Posted by on 8:31 am Body fat, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

 

 

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low-fat diet?

 

Research has compared these different approaches a while back, and we have had the results for a while. The reason why they’re still are questions about the best approach is probably that there are many ways to lose weight, and especially a high-fat diet also called a ketogenic diet has been promoted as a solution to almost everything including weight loss.

What did the research show when it comes to cardiovascular risk?

The participants of this study completed each 4-week diet intervention with a 4 week washout period between each approach (Miller M, et.al., 2009).

 

 

 

Food records were analyzed, fasting blood samples, and brachial artery reactivity testing was performed. During the Mediterranean and the high carbohydrate, low-fat diets maintenance phase, there were significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL).

For the Mediterranean diet the LDL decreased 11.8%, and for the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet the LDL decreased by 16.6%.

The LDL increased on the high-fat diet.

CRP, an inflammatory marker decreased the most on the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet and increased on the high-fat diet.

 

 

Brachial artery testing revealed an inverse correlation between flow-mediated vasodilatation and intake of saturated fat. This means decreased vasodilation with increased fat intake.

The science does not back up the promoted benefits of a high-fat diet.

According to the research, a high-fat diet increases cardiovascular risk.

It is, however, important to remember that not all carbohydrates are equal.

Avoid processed high glycemic index carbohydrates, and increase the intake of plant-based food.

 

 

Reference:

Miller M1, Beach V, Sorkin JD, Mangano C, Dobmeier C, Novacic D, Rhyne J, Vogel RA. Comparative effects of three popular diets on lipids, endothelial function, and C-reactive protein during weight maintenance.J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Apr;109(4):713-7.

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

Posted by on 8:39 am Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Lose fat, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

 

Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

 

Let’s see what science says about the effect of the ketogenic diet on the cardiovascular system.
The goal of this study was to measure changes in glucose, lipid, and inflammation (Rosenbaum
M, et al., 2019).
17 men were put on a baseline control diet for 4 weeks and then switched to a ketogenic diet for
4 weeks.
This is what the researchers found.
Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein were significantly
increased on the ketogenic diet.
These are all cardiovascular disease risk markers. Especially LDL cholesterol and C-reactive
protein which is an inflammatory marker.

 

 

Flow-mediated dilation is another indicator of vascular health.
In this study, obese participants were either consuming high fat or low-fat meals for 6 weeks
(Varady KA, et al., 2011).
After 6 weeks, flow-mediated dilation improved in the low-fat group with a 32% increase and was
impaired in the high-fat group with a 19% reduction.
When 42 participants consumed a ketogenic diet for 6 week LDL cholesterol increased
significantly with 10.7% (Urbain P, et al., 2017).

 

 

Research, in general, has shown an increase in LDL cholesterol with a high-fat diet.
Negative effects on the cardiovascular system seem to be a concern with high-fat diets even if
some people may respond more favorably to a ketogenic diet than others.

References:

Rosenbaum M, Hall KD, Guo J, Ravussin E, Mayer LS, Reitman ML, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Leibel
RL, Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis and Inflammation in Humans Following an Isocaloric
Ketogenic Diet. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Jun;27(6):971-981.

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H, Impact of a 6-week
non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical
parameters in healthy adults. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17.

Varady KA, Bhutani S, Klempel MC, Phillips SA. Improvements in vascular health by a low-fat
diet, but not a high-fat diet, are mediated by changes in adipocyte biology. Nutr J. 2011 Jan
20;10:8.

 

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

 

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood triglycerides, Body fat, Body mass index, Diet, Eating, Exercise, Fat, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Muscles, Sports performance, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

ketogenic diet

 

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

 

There is a lot of promotion and talk about the benefits of restricting carbohydrate intake and eating a high fat, ketogenic diet.

When you read things like that, always ask, where is the evidence? Is there any science supporting the claims?

There is agreement on that more lean muscle mass and a lower body fat percentage are beneficial. This is true for everybody, but especially athletes.

Before you go on a high-fat diet, you want to know how a regime like that will affect your lean muscle mass.

The following research included 42 healthy individuals that followed a ketogenic diet for 6 weeks consisting of the same calorie intake as their regular diet (Urbain P, et.al., 2017).

They were tested for several things at the start of the study and after 6 weeks.

 

 

VO2peak and peak power decreased after the ketogenic diet.

The participants lost equal amounts of fat and fat-free mass, which means they lost some muscle mass.

Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol increased significantly, LDL by 10.7% which is quite a lot, especially since LDL is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Glucose, insulin, and IGF-1 (a growth factor) dropped significantly by 3.0, 22.2 and 20.2%.

Another non-significant change was also seen.

 

ketogenic diet 2

 

Similar results were found when seventeen overweight or obese men were admitted to metabolic wards where they consumed a high-carbohydrate baseline diet for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of a ketogenic diet (Hall KD, et.al., 2016).

 

Body fat loss slowed during the ketogenic diet and coincided with increased protein utilization and loss of fat-free mass. These participants also lost muscle mass, and this study was done under very strict control.

 

Apparently a high-fat diet is not producing the amazing results some would want you to believe.

 

References

 

Hall KD, Chen KY, Guo J, Lam YY, Leibel RL, Mayer LE, Reitman ML, Rosenbaum M, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Ravussin E. Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):324-33.

 

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H.Impact of a 6-week non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical parameters in healthy adults.Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

Is there an easy way to reduce inflammation without causing side effects?

Posted by on 11:12 am Diet, Eating, Inflammation, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Can you just implement one simple thing to help reduce inflammation?  You actually can and it is not taking an anti-inflammatory drug. What I’m talking about you can buy it in a regular grocery store.

Low grade inflammation is inflammation you may not be aware of because it does not result in any visible signs like when you sprain an ankle.

It can however be measured with a blood test. 

This type of inflammation is a risk factor for all kinds of chronic diseases from cardiovascular disease to arthritis.

The most effective way to reduce this type of inflammation is to make changes to the way you eat. You can also take certain nutritional supplements to reduce the inflammation further.

This research is however showing that by just adding one food to your diet, inflammation was reduced (Esmaillzadeh A, Azadbakht L, 2012).

486 female teachers were included in the research. These women were tested for several inflammatory markers, and their dietary intake were assessed.

The researchers found that legume intake was inversely associated with serum concentrations of highly sensitive CRP, TNFα, and IL-6, all inflammatory markers, even after controlling for potential confounders and dietary variables.

According to this research, higher intake of legumes were found to reduce inflammation.

This is easy to accomplish if you add either beans or lentils to salads, soups, and stews. It would make a nice difference if you started to use legumes instead of potatoes and rice. 

You can either cook the beans yourself, or buy organic canned beans. For this to work you need to always have some cooked beans on hand, either in the refrigerator or in a can. That way you can easily add them to a meal.

Reference

Esmaillzadeh A, Azadbakht L, Legume consumption is inversely associated with serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers among Iranian women. J Nutr. 2012 Feb;142(2):334-9.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

What can blueberries do for you?

Posted by on 1:49 am Anti-aging, Antioxidents, Diet, Eating, General Health, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Blueberries contain flavonoids and it is the flavonoids that provide all the health benefits.

The following study showed that daily 1-month blueberry consumption increased flow-mediated dilation as well as lowered systolic blood pressure (Rodriguez-Mateos A, et.al., 2019).

The more blueberries are researched, the more impressive they look.

Flow-mediated dilation is a measurement of endothelial function (the endothelium is the inner lining of the blood vessels).

When flow-mediated dilation was measured in healthy men after blueberry flavonoid intake, the researchers found a dose-dependent increase up to an intake of 766 mg polyphenols (Rodriguez-Mateos A, et.al., 2013). The increase was seen from 1-6 hours after the intake.

Blueberries can be used to help protect the blood vessels from damage as the following study shows.

Human aortic endothelial cells showed a reduced expression of inflammatory markers after being exposed to substances found from blueberry consumption (Cutler BR, et.al., 2018).

100 g of blueberries twice daily would give you protection the whole day. While fresh blueberries are expensive, frozen blueberries are better priced.  Adding blueberries to your diet daily would give you these benefits.

References

Cutler BR, Gholami S, Chua JS, Kuberan B, Anandh Babu PV.Blueberry metabolites restore cell surface glycosaminoglycans and attenuate endothelial inflammation in diabetic human aortic endothelial cells. Int J Cardiol. 2018 Jun 15;261:155-158.

Rodriguez-Mateos A, Istas G, Boschek L, Feliciano RP, Mills CE, Boby C, Gomez-Alonso S, Milenkovic D, Heiss C,Circulating anthocyanin metabolites mediate vascular benefits of blueberries: insights from randomized controlled trials, metabolomics, and nutrigenomics. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2019 Feb 16. pii: glz047.

Rodriguez-Mateos A, Rendeiro C, Bergillos-Meca T, Tabatabaee S, George TW, Heiss C, Spencer JP.Intake and time dependence of blueberry flavonoid-induced improvements in vascular function: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study with mechanistic insights into biological activity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Nov;98(5):1179-91.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

A lesser-known benefit of a plant based diet

Posted by on 4:37 am Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Insulin resistance, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

You may not have heard about Trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), but this metabolite is created by the bacterial flora in the gut in response to certain food components.  This is the process.

TMAO originates from a precursor, trimethylamine (TMA) that is a metabolite of mainly choline and carnitine from ingested foods and may be involved in insulin resistance (Oellgaard J, et.al., 2017).  Why is TMAO important?

TMAO may not only increase the risk for insulin resistance, but also TMAO appears to be of particular importance as a risk factor and potentially a causative agent of various pathologies, mostly cardiovascular disease and other associated conditions (Al-Rubaye H, et.al., 2018).

Dietary l-carnitine is converted into the atherosclerosis- and thrombosis-promoting metabolite TMAO via gut microbiota-dependent transformations.
TMAO transformation is induced by omnivorous dietary patterns and chronic l-carnitine exposure (Koeth RA, et.al., 2019 ).


A big difference in the TMAO levels can seen when comparing people eating animal-based protein to vegans (who eat plant-based protein). Eating a plant-based diet results in a different gut bacterial flora and will not produce much TMAO.

References

Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as a New Potential Therapeutic Target for Insulin Resistance and Cancer.
Oellgaard J, Winther SA, Hansen TS, Rossing P, von Scholten BJ.
Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(25):3699-3712. doi: 10.2174/1381612823666170622095324. Review.
PMID:28641532

The Role of Microbiota in Cardiovascular Risk: Focus on Trimethylamine Oxide.
Al-Rubaye H, Perfetti G, Kaski JC.
Curr Probl Cardiol. 2018 Jul 7. pii: S0146-2806(18)30079-3. doi: 10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2018.06.005. [Epub ahead of print] Review.
PMID:30482503

l-Carnitine in omnivorous diets induces an atherogenic gut microbial pathway in humans.
Koeth RA, Lam-Galvez BR, Kirsop J, Wang Z, Levison BS, Gu X, Copeland MF, Bartlett D, Cody DB, Dai HJ, Culley MK, Li XS, Fu X, Wu Y, Li L, DiDonato JA, Tang WHW, Garcia-Garcia JC, Hazen SL. J Clin Invest. 2019 Jan 2;129(1):373-387. doi: 10.1172/JCI94601. Epub 2018 Dec 10.  PMID:30530985

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…