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Your Road to Wellness

Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome

A lesser-known benefit of a plant based diet

Posted by on 4:37 am Diet, Diseases, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Insulin resistance, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

You may not have heard about Trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), but this metabolite is created by the bacterial flora in the gut in response to certain food components.  This is the process.

TMAO originates from a precursor, trimethylamine (TMA) that is a metabolite of mainly choline and carnitine from ingested foods and may be involved in insulin resistance (Oellgaard J, et.al., 2017).  Why is TMAO important?

TMAO may not only increase the risk for insulin resistance, but also TMAO appears to be of particular importance as a risk factor and potentially a causative agent of various pathologies, mostly cardiovascular disease and other associated conditions (Al-Rubaye H, et.al., 2018).

Dietary l-carnitine is converted into the atherosclerosis- and thrombosis-promoting metabolite TMAO via gut microbiota-dependent transformations.
TMAO transformation is induced by omnivorous dietary patterns and chronic l-carnitine exposure (Koeth RA, et.al., 2019 ).


A big difference in the TMAO levels can seen when comparing people eating animal-based protein to vegans (who eat plant-based protein). Eating a plant-based diet results in a different gut bacterial flora and will not produce much TMAO.

References

Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as a New Potential Therapeutic Target for Insulin Resistance and Cancer.
Oellgaard J, Winther SA, Hansen TS, Rossing P, von Scholten BJ.
Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(25):3699-3712. doi: 10.2174/1381612823666170622095324. Review.
PMID:28641532

The Role of Microbiota in Cardiovascular Risk: Focus on Trimethylamine Oxide.
Al-Rubaye H, Perfetti G, Kaski JC.
Curr Probl Cardiol. 2018 Jul 7. pii: S0146-2806(18)30079-3. doi: 10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2018.06.005. [Epub ahead of print] Review.
PMID:30482503

l-Carnitine in omnivorous diets induces an atherogenic gut microbial pathway in humans.
Koeth RA, Lam-Galvez BR, Kirsop J, Wang Z, Levison BS, Gu X, Copeland MF, Bartlett D, Cody DB, Dai HJ, Culley MK, Li XS, Fu X, Wu Y, Li L, DiDonato JA, Tang WHW, Garcia-Garcia JC, Hazen SL. J Clin Invest. 2019 Jan 2;129(1):373-387. doi: 10.1172/JCI94601. Epub 2018 Dec 10.  PMID:30530985

 

 

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Reduce your blood glucose level eating this snack.

Posted by on 4:52 pm Bloodsugar, Diabetes, Eating, Glucose, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Nut consumption, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

pistachio nutsYou don’t have to have diabetes to benefit from better blood sugar control.

The reviewed research showed that sometimes it doesn’t have to be very difficult(Parham M, et al. 2014).

 

The participants of this study had type 2 diabetes. One group was given 25g of pistachio nuts as snacks twice a day for 12 weeks while the other group was given a control meal without nuts.

After 12 weeks the groups were switched so the group that got the test meal now received the nuts.

The pistachio nuts reduced fasting blood glucose, HbA1c (a measurement of long term glucose control), blood pressure, BMI (body mass index) and CRP an inflammatory marker.

All this from just eating some nuts.

 

 
Parham M1, Heidari S2, Khorramirad A2, Hozoori M3, Hosseinzadeh F1, Bakhtyari L4, Vafaeimanesh J1. Effects of pistachio nut supplementation on blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized crossover trial. Rev Diabet Stud. 2014 Summer;11(2):190-6. doi: 10.1900/RDS.2014.11.190. Epub 2014 Aug 10.

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Elevated levels of common lab test associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's.

Posted by on 6:46 pm Brain, Cognition, Dementia, General Health, Glucose, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals | 0 comments

img_salad_steakThere is no single test available at the time to specifically diagnose Alzheimer’s disease or to only show the risk for it. New research, however, indicates that a common test like fasting glucose may tell us something about the risk (Burns CM, et al. 2014).

When regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in brain regions usually affected by Alzheimer disease was measured, a correlation with fasting glucose levels was found. Higher fasting glucose levels in cognitively normal, non diabetic adults were correlated with lower regional cerebral metabolic rate.

This means that higher fasting glucose levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease and increase the risk for this disease.

What is the solution? A diet consisting of high nutrient, low glycemic index food, exercise and meditation for better handling of stress. This type of lifestyle will also reduce the risk for all other chronic conditions as well.

 

 

 

Burns CM1, Chen K, Kaszniak AW, Lee W, Alexander GE, Bandy D, Fleisher AS, Caselli RJ, Reiman EM.Higher serum glucose levels are associated with cerebral hypometabolism in Alzheimer regions. Neurology. 2013 Apr 23;80(17):1557-64. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31828f17de. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

How healthy is green tea?

Posted by on 9:07 am Antioxidents, Bloodsugar, Diabetes, General Health, Glucose, Green tea, Insulin resistance, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Supplements, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

Grüner TeeGreen tea seems to be one of the best things you can drink for your health. One of the reasons is that it contains a lot of antioxidants.

One of the most important things we can do to stay healthy is to be sure we stay insulin sensitive. When we are insulin sensitive the glucose is transferred from the blood into the cells very easily without the pancreas having to release a lot of insulin. This will keep the blood glucose at a low and normal level, and also help to keep inflammation low, both are very important if we want to be healthy.

The reviewed research investigated if green tea could improve glucose control and increase insulin sensitivity(Liu K, et.al.,2013). 17 studies were included in the analysis. It showed that green tea consumption significantly reduced the fasting glucose and Hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is a test for long-term glucose control.

If you don’t like green tea and if you want to be sure your green tea does not contain a lot of pesticides, you can take it in capsule form like our Better Green Tea formula which meets the German standards for pesticide content, which is very strict.

 

 

 

Liu K1, Zhou R, Wang B, Chen K, Shi LY, Zhu JD, Mi MT. Effect of green tea on glucose control and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):340-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.052746. Epub 2013 Jun 26.

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Could gluten cause problems for everybody?

Posted by on 8:17 am Eating, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

3d render of digestive systemThere is more and more information published every day on adverse reactions to gluten.

We used to believe that if you did not have celiac disease, you would not have any issues with gluten. This does not seem to be true since there are different degrees of gluten intolerance. People who have celiac disease just have a very severe reaction to it.

A gastroenterologist and researcher at Harvard University has published a very interesting article on this subject(Fasano,A,2011).

The intestinal mucosa act as a barrier to protect us from pathogens and other particles that are not supposed to be absorbed into the blood. This is called intestinal permeability. Dr. Fasano explains that gliadin (a protein found in gluten) trigger IL-8 (an inflammatory cytokine) leading to recruitment of neutrophils. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell which are activated as a part of the body’s defense mechanism.

Gliadin increases intestinal permeability through the release of a substance called zonulin. When the intestinal permeability increases we may absorb both pathogens (bacterias) and larger proteins not intended to be absorbed, triggering an inflammatory response.

Gliadin also interacts with macrophages, another type of white blood cell. This establishes an inflammatory environment in the intestinal mucosa. Depending on genetic predisposition, we will then experience a more or less severe reaction. This may, for example, trigger an autoimmune response in someone who is predisposed to that.

In other words, it looks like gluten is triggering an inflammatory response in everybody, but because we don’t have exactly the same genes, we will not have exactly the same reaction.

Gluten is found in common grains, but gluten free grains are not without problems either because they elevate the blood glucose high.

There are; however, solutions to this which you will find in the Learn to Eat program.

 

 

 Fasano A.  Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.

Inflammation: it's dangerous!

Posted by on 12:48 pm Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, General Health, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Cardiovascular healthYou might think of inflammation as something you don’t have a problem with unless you have a hot and swollen joint or have recently injured yourself. Even then, it may look like a localized reaction not affecting any other part of your body.

This is far from the truth. Any type of inflammation, in any area of the body, will also affect the rest of the body.

The most dangerous form of inflammation may actually be what we call low grade inflammation because we may not have any visible signs. This means you don’t have to have a swollen joint to have an issue with it. This type of inflammation becomes systemic, which means it will affect your whole body and can be measured testing different inflammatory markers. It is also a risk factor for chronic disease, and cardiovascular disease is one of them.

The reviewed research investigated something interesting. The researchers  measured several inflammatory markers: three of them were C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both heathy and non healthy obese and non obese participants(Phillips CM, Perry IJ, 2013). The results showed that the determining factor if somebody was metabolically healthy or unhealthy was  the degree of inflammation even if they were obese.

This does not mean that it is a good idea to be obese, because that usually leads to increased inflammation, but somebody who is overweight may have a lower risk for cardiovascular disease if they have very low inflammatory markers.

It is very important to keep inflammation low. You can significantly lower inflammation by eating a certain way. For more information on how to lower inflammation with your diet, click here.

 

 

 

Phillips CM, Perry IJ. Does Inflammation Determine Metabolic Health Status in Obese and Nonobese Adults? J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Aug 26. [Epub ahead of print]

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