Your Road to Wellness

Inflammatory factor

2 important things to help you stay healthy and feel good.

Posted by on 9:00 am Diabetes, Diet, Eating, Energy, Health, Health Risk, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Low glycemic meals, Stay healthy, Supplements, Supplements for Conditions, Supplements List, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes | 0 comments

blood glucose food

 

You need to keep your glucose metabolism healthy by keeping your blood glucose at a low and
normal level.
There are several reasons why this is important. When your blood glucose is elevated to a high
level as it tends to be when we get insulin resistant, and when we eat high glycemic index food,
we usually get tired.
Elevated blood glucose also leads to increased low-grade inflammation, and inflammation is the
the second thing you need to keep low to stay healthy.
Increasing CRP, an inflammatory marker, has been found with higher fasting glucose levels,
even among subjects with fasting glucose in the normal range (Aronson D. et.al., 2004).

 

 

Eating high nutrient, low glycemic index meals are important, and so is exercise.
There is however something else you also can do to keep your blood glucose lower.
You can take berberine, a natural plant derivative.
Berberine has shown to provide several health benefits. One of them is keeping the blood
glucose at a lower, normal level.

In the following study participants with type 2 diabetes were randomized to take either berberine
or metformin (a diabetic medication) for 3 months (Yin J, et.al., 2008).
The effect of berberine was found to be similar to metformin.
A significant decrease in hemoglobin A1c from 9.5% to 7.5% was found when taking berberine.
Hemoglobin A1c is a measurement of long term glucose control.
Fasting blood glucose was reduced with 34.9%, postprandial blood glucose with 43.9%, and
plasma triglycerides with 21.2%. Postprandial glucose is the blood glucose measured after a
meal.
The insulin resistance index was reduced by 44.7%.
Another study which included 116 patients also with type 2 diabetes showed similar results
(Zhang Y, et.al., 2008).
In these studies, the participants had type 2 diabetes which means they were severely insulin
resistant.
There is no reason to wait until we get a serious disease before taking action.
Berberine can be used to help keep glucose metabolism healthy.

 

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References

Aronson D, Bartha P, Zinder O, Kerner A, Shitman E, Markiewicz W, Brook GJ, Levy
Y. Association between fasting glucose and C-reactive protein in middle-aged subjects.
Diabet Med. 2004 Jan;21(1):39-44.

Zhang Y, Li X, Zou D, Liu W, Yang J, Zhu N, Huo L, Wang M, Hong J, Wu P, Ren G, Ning
G. Treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia with the natural plant alkaloid berberine.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jul;93(7):2559-65.

Yin J, Xing H, Ye J. Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolism.
2008 May;57(5):712-7. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2008.01.013.

glucose metabolism support

This formula was designed to support healthy glucose metabolism and the cardiovascular system.

The research referred to below was conducted with participants who had type 2 diabetes. This does not mean that you have to have type 2 diabetes to take this formula.

It’s very important to have a healthy glucose metabolism and keep the blood glucose low. You want to take this formula and keep your glucose metabolism healthy.

Healthy glucose metabolism is important to keep your cardiovascular system healthy.

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Reduce Inflammation By Adding 1 Food

Posted by on 9:52 am Anti-aging, General Health, Health Risk, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor | 0 comments

You can reduce inflammation by adding just 1 type of food to your diet.

If you also remove another food, you will get even better results.

When a group of type 2 diabetes patients replaced 2 servings of red meat with different types of legumes like lentils, chickpeas, peas and beans for only 3 days per week for 8 weeks, this was the result (Hosseinpour-Niazi S, et.al., 2015).

 

heart shape by various vegetables and fruits

The legumes resulted in significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory markers hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, compared to when they ingested the red meat instead of the legumes.

 

After consuming a legume diet for 6 weeks, comparing it to their regular diet, first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes had significantly reduced levels of hs-CRP (Saraf-Bank F, et.al., 2015).

Women with the highest legume intake had lower levels of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha compared to the ones with the lowest intake (Ezmaillzadeh A, Azakbakht L, 2012).

 

Just by adding beans or lentils to your meals, you can reduce low-grade inflammation significantly.

That is not difficult. Adding beans to a salad is easy, and if you substitute potatoes or rice with beans or lentils, you should notice a nice difference in your inflammatory markers.

Not only will you see a difference there, but most likely you will also see a reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well.

 

 

References:

  1. Hosseinpour-Niazi, S., Mirmiran, P., Fallah-Ghohroudi, A., & Azizi, F. (2015). Non-soya legume-based therapeutic lifestyle change diet reduces inflammatory status in diabetic patients: a randomised cross-over clinical trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 114(2), 213-219.
  2. Saraf-Bank, S., Esmaillzadeh, A., Faghihimani, E., & Azadbakht, L. (2015). Effect of non-soy legume consumption on inflammation and serum adiponectin levels among first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes: A randomized, crossover study. Nutrition, 31(3), 459-465.
  3. Esmaillzadeh, A., & Azadbakht, L. (2012). Legume consumption is inversely associated with serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers among Iranian women. The Journal of nutrition, 142(2), 334-339.

Learn To Eat Program:

Recommendations that work. Foods that can reduce inflammation. This is not a regular diet.

Is systemic inflammation making your pain worse?

Posted by on 5:18 pm Anti-aging, Arthritis, Eating, Exercise, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory factor, Tendonitis, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

Fotolia,painKnee pain is very common as we get older, and so is systemic inflammation, but what is systemic inflammation?
Systemic inflammation is the type of inflammation that you may not even know you have an issue with, because you don’t have to have a swollen joint. This type of inflammation is low grade, and it affects your whole body. It can, however, be measured by checking certain inflammatory markers.
The reviewed research investigated if there was an association between increased knee pain and systemic inflammation(Stannus OP et al. 2013). The participants were 149 men and women with an average age of 63 years. Knee pain was determined using an osteoarthritis pain questionnaire at the start of the study and then five years later. Radio graphs as well as MRI were used in the examination.
Several inflammatory markers were tested, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6).

The conclusion was that systemic inflammation is an independent predictor of worsening knee pain over 5 years. Adjustments for radio graphic osteoarthritis or structural abnormalities detected on the MRI did not make much difference regarding that association.

Does this mean that you can’t do anything about this?

No, you can do something about this, and I suggest you do, because systemic inflammation is also a risk factor for chronic disease.

Research has documented that the food you eat can be quite effective in reducing this type of inflammation.

This is one of the things you learn in “The Learn to Eat Plan“. You can read more about it here.

 
 
 
 
Stannus OP1, Jones G, Blizzard L, Cicuttini FM, Ding C. Associations between serum levels of inflammatory markers and change in knee pain over 5 years in older adults: a prospective cohort study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Apr;72(4):535-40. doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-201047. Epub 2012 May 12.

Could gluten cause problems for everybody?

Posted by on 8:17 am Eating, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Low glycemic meals, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss, Wellness | 0 comments

3d render of digestive systemThere is more and more information published every day on adverse reactions to gluten.

We used to believe that if you did not have celiac disease, you would not have any issues with gluten. This does not seem to be true since there are different degrees of gluten intolerance. People who have celiac disease just have a very severe reaction to it.

A gastroenterologist and researcher at Harvard University has published a very interesting article on this subject(Fasano,A,2011).

The intestinal mucosa act as a barrier to protect us from pathogens and other particles that are not supposed to be absorbed into the blood. This is called intestinal permeability. Dr. Fasano explains that gliadin (a protein found in gluten) trigger IL-8 (an inflammatory cytokine) leading to recruitment of neutrophils. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell which are activated as a part of the body’s defense mechanism.

Gliadin increases intestinal permeability through the release of a substance called zonulin. When the intestinal permeability increases we may absorb both pathogens (bacterias) and larger proteins not intended to be absorbed, triggering an inflammatory response.

Gliadin also interacts with macrophages, another type of white blood cell. This establishes an inflammatory environment in the intestinal mucosa. Depending on genetic predisposition, we will then experience a more or less severe reaction. This may, for example, trigger an autoimmune response in someone who is predisposed to that.

In other words, it looks like gluten is triggering an inflammatory response in everybody, but because we don’t have exactly the same genes, we will not have exactly the same reaction.

Gluten is found in common grains, but gluten free grains are not without problems either because they elevate the blood glucose high.

There are; however, solutions to this which you will find in the Learn to Eat program.

 

 

 Fasano A.  Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.

A benefit of exercise you may not be aware of.

Posted by on 5:10 pm Anti-aging, BMJ Formula, Energy, Exercise, Exercise, Get in shape, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory factor, Intensity Training, Muscles, The Learn to Eat Plan, Wellness | 0 comments

Jogging together - sport young coupleAs we get older inflammation usually increases. You don’t necessarily have to get increased inflammation as you age, but that’s what’s been observed in a lot of people. You probably know that inflammation is a risk factor for most chronic diseases, it can also make you more uncomfortable because it can contribute to pain.

It would be great if you had a way to reduce inflammation without taking any medication. In fact there are ways you can do that, and instead of side effects you even get a lot of additional benefits.

Exercise is one of the things that can reduce inflammation. That is exactly what the reviewed study investigated, by looking at data from a lot of research on this specific topic(Woods JA, et al. 2012). Data on the participants activity level, as well as measurements of several inflammatory markers, were used.

As you may have guessed, exercise was found to reduce some of these inflammatory markers, especially highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP).

One of the studies they looked at also investigated the effects of antioxidants on inflammation. They found that the participants who took antioxidants had reduced inflammation, even if they did not exercise(Colbert LH, et al. 2004).

The logical thing would be to both exercise and take antioxidants.

The most effective antioxidant the body makes is glutathione, but the problem is that it  produces less of it as we get older, when we actually need more.

You can read more about this by clicking here.

 

 

 

Colbert LH1, Visser M, Simonsick EM, Tracy RP, Newman AB, Kritchevsky SB, Pahor M, Taaffe DR, Brach J, Rubin S, Harris TB. Physical activity, exercise, and inflammatory markers in older adults: findings from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Jul;52(7):1098-104.
Woods JA1, Wilund KR, Martin SA, Kistler BM. Exercise, inflammation and aging. Aging Dis. 2012 Feb;3(1):130-40. Epub 2011 Oct 29.

 

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Inflammation: it's dangerous!

Posted by on 12:48 pm BMJ Formula, Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory factor, Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Cardiovascular healthYou might think of inflammation as something you don’t have a problem with unless you have a hot and swollen joint or have recently injured yourself. Even then, it may look like a localized reaction not affecting any other part of your body.

This is far from the truth. Any type of inflammation, in any area of the body, will also affect the rest of the body.

The most dangerous form of inflammation may actually be what we call low grade inflammation because we may not have any visible signs. This means you don’t have to have a swollen joint to have an issue with it. This type of inflammation becomes systemic, which means it will affect your whole body and can be measured testing different inflammatory markers. It is also a risk factor for chronic disease, and cardiovascular disease is one of them.

The reviewed research investigated something interesting. The researchers  measured several inflammatory markers: three of them were C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both heathy and non healthy obese and non obese participants(Phillips CM, Perry IJ, 2013). The results showed that the determining factor if somebody was metabolically healthy or unhealthy was  the degree of inflammation even if they were obese.

This does not mean that it is a good idea to be obese, because that usually leads to increased inflammation, but somebody who is overweight may have a lower risk for cardiovascular disease if they have very low inflammatory markers.

It is very important to keep inflammation low. You can significantly lower inflammation by eating a certain way. For more information on how to lower inflammation with your diet, click here.

 

 

 

Phillips CM, Perry IJ. Does Inflammation Determine Metabolic Health Status in Obese and Nonobese Adults? J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Aug 26. [Epub ahead of print]

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