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What foods affect your memory?

Posted by on 6:09 am Brain, Eating, Health | 0 comments

 

It takes several years before you see the results from the wrong food choices. That’s why it’s better to make changes to the way you eat before you notice symptoms of neurodegeneration like you see in Alzheimer’s disease.

Less serious symptoms like forgetfulness called mild cognitive decline is something to pay attention to.

Start to implement good eating habits avoiding foods that research has found to be contributing to neurodegeneration, and include foods that are beneficial for the nervous system and the brain if it is supported by scientific evidence.

When somebody recommends a certain type of food, be sure there is evidence supporting the benefits of consuming this with a scientific reference, not a reference from the popular press.

There is a lot of believes presented as evidence even by doctors, be a little bit skeptical and read what the references say and see if you agree.

A lot has been written about fat lately, and saturated fat is promoted by many as very healthy and something you should eat a lot of.

The following study evaluated 6,183 older participants and their intake of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (Okereke OI, et.al., 2012).

The participants were tested using several cognitive tests, and their cognitive abilities were related to the type of fat they were consuming.

Higher saturated fat intake was associated with worse cognition.

Higher monounsaturated fat was related to better cognition.

Where do we find saturated fat? The major sources come from animal type fat like meat, cheese and other dairy products.

What other types of food may help your memory?

Vegetables, unsaturated fats, and a high score for the Mediterranean diet were found to reduce the odds ratio for mild cognitive decline (Roberts RO, et.al., 2010).

 

References

Okereke OI, Rosner BA, Kim DH, Kang JH, Cook NR, Manson JE, Buring JE, Willett WC, Grodstein F. Dietary fat types and 4-year cognitive change in community-dwelling older women. Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):124-34.

Roberts RO, Geda YE, Cerhan JR, Knopman DS, Cha RH, Christianson TJ, Pankratz VS, Ivnik RJ, Boeve BF, O’Connor HM, Petersen RC. Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(5):413-23.

 

 

 

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Reduce your risk of heart attacks by adding one food to your meals

Posted by on 9:53 pm Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, Health | 0 comments

 

Research shows adding one food reduces the risk for heart attacks by 38%.

Sometimes you can get big benefits by making small changes.

There are several studies showing that just adding legumes to your meals can lower your cardiovascular risk. The results of this particular study found that only 1 serving of cooked beans per day, which is one third cup, lowered the risk for myocardial infarction with 38% when compared with those eating less than 1 serving per month (Kabagambe EK, et.al., 2005).

Consuming 130 g of beans per day which is slightly more than 1 serving, lowered LDL cholesterol significantly compared to those not eating any beans (Ha V, et.al., 2014).

An average of 19 years follow-up showed that legume consumption 4 times or more per week compared with less than once a week, was associated with a 22% lower risk of coronary heart disease (Bazzano LA,
et.al., 2001).

Beans have also been found to improve circulation in the legs when impaired from a decrease in blood
flow due to the presence of atherosclerotic plaque (Zahradka P, et.al., 2013). When ½ cup of legumes
per day were consumed by participants for 8 weeks, they saw a 5.5% increase of the ankle-brachial
index, with total and LDL-cholesterol reduced by 5.0%. The ankle-brachial index is used to measure
circulation in the legs.

Apparently, you don’t even have to eat a lot of beans to realize these benefits.

References
Bazzano LA, He J, Ogden LG, Loria C, Vupputuri S, Myers L, Whelton PK. Legume consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study.

Ha V, Sievenpiper JL, de Souza RJ, Jayalath VH, Mirrahimi A, Agarwal A, Chiavaroli L, Mejia SB, Sacks FM,
Di Buono M, Bernstein AM, Leiter LA, Kris-Etherton PM, Vuksan V, Bazinet RP, Josse RG, Beyene J, Kendall CW, Jenkins DJ. Effect of dietary pulse intake on established therapeutic lipid targets for cardiovascular risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. CMAJ. 2014 May 13;186(8):E252-62.

Kabagambe EK, Baylin A, Ruiz-Narvarez E, Siles X, Campos H. Decreased consumption of dried mature beans is positively associated with urbanization and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. J Nutr. 2005 Jul;135(7):1770-5. Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 26;161(21):2573-8.

Zahradka P, Wright B, Weighell W, Blewett H, Baldwin A, O K, Guzman RP, Taylor CG. Daily non-soy legume consumption reverses vascular impairment due to peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis. 2013 Oct;230(2):310-4.

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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How does our diet affect our heart health?

Posted by on 1:00 pm Eating, General Health, Health | 0 comments

This is very important. These are the biggest nutrient factors influencing cardiovascular mortality.

This research may surprise you.

The researchers evaluated the association between specific patterns of protein intake and
cardiovascular mortality in 81.337 men and women, and they found some interesting associations
(Tharrey M, et.al., 2018).

The risk for cardiovascular mortality was 61% higher for those who had the highest intake of meat protein, but it was 60% lower for those who had the highest protein intake from nuts and seeds (highest versus lowest quintile scores).

Adjustments for the participant’s vegetarian dietary pattern and nutrients related to cardiovascular disease outcomes did not change the results.

This is very important.

The researchers concluded that the associations between the ‘Meat’ and ‘Nuts & Seeds’ protein factors and cardiovascular outcomes were strong and could not be ascribed to other associated nutrients considered to be important for cardiovascular health.

In the following study the researchers looked at the association between protein intake and ischemic heart disease in 43.960 healthy men (Preis SR, et.al., 2010). They categorized healthy men as those free of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes at the start of the study.

When they compared the intake of animal protein with vegetable protein, they found higher intake of animal protein to be associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease. The follow up was 18 years.

There are also other studies indicating the same thing. This is worthwhile paying attention to.

This is good news when you think about it. You have a lot of control when it comes to significantly reducing your risk for cardiovascular disease. No medication can offer you these kind of benefits, and there are no side effects.

References
Preis SR, Stampfer MJ, Spiegelman D, Willett WC, Rimm EB. Dietary protein and risk of ischemic heart
disease in middle-aged men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1265-72.

Tharrey M, Mariotti F, Mashchak A, Barbillon P, Delattre M, Fraser GE. Patterns of plant and animal
protein intake are strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality: the Adventist Health Study-2
cohort. Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Apr 2.

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Can Garlic reduce Vascular Plaque?

Posted by on 6:55 pm Eating, General Health, Health | 0 comments

 

Plaque is a term used for deposits in the arteries.

Not all plaque is equally dangerous. It depends on the thickness and what it is made of. The most dangerous plaque is unstable and may create a blood clot causing an obstruction of an artery if it breaks loose.

When 1469 patients with low to intermediate cardiovascular risk were evaluated with coronary CT angiography, the researchers found that the risk for major adverse cardiac events increased with a non-calcifying plaque component (Feuchtner G, et.al., 2017)

 

What is termed low-attenuation plaque is plaque with lower density, below a certain thickness. This is what the researchers found to be one of the most powerful predictors of major adverse cardiac events.

 

What follows now is the most important information, because the researchers in the next study documented an easy way to stabilize vulnerable plaque and decrease adverse cardiovascular events (Matsumoto S, et.al., 2016).


The researchers evaluated patients with metabolic syndrome using cardiac computed tomography angiography at the beginning of the study. Then they gave them either 2400 mg of aged garlic extract per day, or a placebo for approximately one year before evaluating them again.

 

They found that the participants taking the aged garlic had significantly reduced low-attenuation plaque, which is the dangerous type.

 

Sometimes there are easy steps you can take to reduce your cardiovascular risk. The best way to use information like this is not only to take garlic extract, but to add that to a diet documented to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

 

References

Feuchtner G, Kerber J, Burghard P, Dichtl W, Friedrich G, Bonaros N, Plank F. The high-risk criteria low-attenuation plaque <60 HU and the napkin-ring sign are the most powerful predictors of MACE: a long-term follow-up study. Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2017 Jul 1;18(7):772-779.

Matsumoto S, Nakanishi R, Li D, Alani A, Rezaeian P, Prabhu S, Abraham J, Fahmy MA, Dailing C, Flores F, Hamal S, Broersen A, Kitslaar PH, Budoff MJ. Aged Garlic Extract Reduces Low Attenuation Plaque in Coronary Arteries of Patients with Metabolic Syndrome in a Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study. J Nutr. 2016 Feb;146(2):427S-432S.

 

 Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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Can your bacterial flora clog up your arteries?

Posted by on 10:28 am Eating, General Health, Health, Inflammation | 0 comments

 

As more and more research is being conducted on the bacterial flora of the intestines, the more we realize how important it is to have an abundant and diverse bacterial population of the healthy kind. The researchers of the following study found that patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis had more of certain gut bacteria than healthy controls (Karlsson FH, et.al., 2012).

The bacterial flora is associated with our inflammatory status, that’s what these researchers suggested, and we know that inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract creates inflammation other places in the body and is a risk factor for atherosclerosis.

Your bacterial flora can for that reason clog up your arteries if you have the wrong type of bacteria.

When bacteria in atherosclerotic plaques were examined, specific types were identified, and some types correlated with total cholesterol and fibrinogen levels (Ziganshina EE, et.al., 2016). Periodontal disease has also been associated with atherosclerosis.

Bacterial DNA was detected in atherosclerotic plaque, and the amount of DNA correlated with the number of leukocytes (a type of white blood cell), found in the atherosclerotic plaque (Koren O, et.al., 2011). Leukocytes are involved in the inflammatory response.

Several types of bacteria in the mouth and the gut correlated with blood cholesterol levels. How can you increase the number of friendly bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract?

These bacteria feed on a variety of plant fiber. When you eat a plant-based diet with a variety of vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, your healthy flora will increase, and these bacteria reduce inflammation.

References

Karlsson FH, Fåk F, Nookaew I, Tremaroli V, Fagerberg B, Petranovic D, Bäckhed F, Nielsen J. Symptomatic atherosclerosis is associated with an altered gut metagenome. Nat Commun. 2012;3:1245.

Koren O, Spor A, Felin J, Fåk F, Stombaugh J, Tremaroli V, Behre CJ, Knight R, Fagerberg B, Ley RE, Bäckhed F. Human oral, gut, and plaque microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Mar 15;108 Suppl 1:4592-8.

Ziganshina EE, Sharifullina DM, Lozhkin AP, Khayrullin RN, Ignatyev IM, Ziganshin AM. Bacterial Communities Associated with Atherosclerotic Plaques from Russian Individuals with Atherosclerosis. PLoS One. 2016 Oct 13;11(10):e0164836.

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Magnesium is Even More Important than We Used to Think

Posted by on 9:24 pm Brain, Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, Gastrointestinal Health, General Health, Health, magnesium, Vitamin D | 0 comments

Research is documenting how functions, organs, and nutrients are all interconnected. We cannot look at anything as separate entities anymore if we are going to get an accurate impression of what happens physiologically from the input of nutrient intake as well as exercise. The GI tract is one example where researchers have documented communication between the GI tract and the brain. We know the brain also communicates with the GI tract.

Intestinal absorption and subsequent metabolism of a nutrient, to a certain extent, is dependent on the availability of other nutrients.

The following research is showing us how the intake and the impact of magnesium are affecting vitamin D levels.

Image result for magnesium

Magnesium assists in the activation of vitamin D because all of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium (Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS, 2018).

Deficiency in either of these nutrients is reported to be associated with skeletal deformities, cardiovascular diseases, and the metabolic syndrome.

The next study indicates the same thing. The researchers found that higher intake of magnesium resulted in higher blood levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which is the most reliable way to measure vitamin D status (Deng X, et.al., 2013).

They also found associations of serum 25(OH)D with mortality, particularly due to cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer, and they were modified by magnesium intake. Magnesium has shown to reduce calcification of the arteries (Hruby A, et.al., 2014).

This means that if you must take a very high amount of vitamin D to keep your vitamin D level in a good range, you most likely need magnesium. If you take enough magnesium in a well-absorbed form, you should not need to take high amounts of vitamin D to keep it at a good level. What we also learn from research like this, is how important it is to take magnesium or any of the other common minerals in a formula that combines these minerals, since they affect each other. Amino acid chelates are the best form to take minerals because they are better absorbed and better tolerated. They don’t cause gastrointestinal irritation.

 

 

References
Deng X, Song Y, Manson JE, Signorello LB, Zhang SM, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Seidner DL, Dai Q. Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III. BMC Med. 2013 Aug 27;11:187.

Hruby A1, O’Donnell CJ2, Jacques PF1, Meigs JB3, Hoffmann U4, McKeown NM5. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Jan;7(1):59-69.

Uwitonze AM, Razzaque MS. Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2018 Mar 1;118(3):181-189.

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