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Health Risk

Reasons for eating a plant based diet

Posted by on 10:45 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Health Risk, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

There are many reasons why eating a plant based diet makes sense.  This research included 131, 342 participants. Of this, 85 013 were women (64.7%) and 46 329 were men (35.3%) (Song M, et.al., 2016).

The researchers found that high animal protein intake was positively associated with cardiovascular mortality, and high plant protein intake was inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.  Processed red meat was the most harmful form of animal protein these researchers found.

The type of fat we eat is also important because we react differently depending on the source.  We know that it is important to have a healthy endothelial function because the endothelium is the inner layer of the blood vessels.

 

We also know the importance of having low inflammation since that’s a risk factor for all chronic diseases and especially cardiovascular disease.   This study indicated that exchanging saturated fat from butterfat for a plant-based fat consisting of polyunsaturated fatty acids in a mixed meal may decrease inflammation after the meal when measured with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and TNF-alpha (Masson CJ, Mensink RP, 2011).  Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, a protein related to the endothelium and a marker of atherosclerosis, was also decreased after the meal containing the plant-based fat.

 

References

Song M1, Fung TT2, Hu FB3, Willett WC3, Longo VD4, Chan AT5, Giovannucci EL.  Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.  JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 1;176(10):1453-1463. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4182.

Masson CJ, Mensink RP. Exchanging saturated fatty acids for (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids in a mixed meal may decrease postprandial lipemia and markers of inflammation and endothelial activity in overweight men. J Nutr. 2011 May;141(5):816-21. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.136432. Epub 2011 Mar 23.

 

 

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Oxidative stress is involved in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by on 8:28 am Alzheimer’s, Anti-Aging, Cognition, Diseases, General Health, Health Risk, Research, Stress, Wellness | 0 comments

Increased oxidative stress has been documented in the frontal cortex in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and in patients with mild cognitive impairment (Ansari, MA 2010).  One of the emerging causative factors associated with Alzheimer’s pathology is oxidative stress. This AD-related increase in oxidative stress has been attributed to decreased levels of the brain antioxidant, glutathione (Saharan and Mandal, 2014). 

The body uses antioxidants to limit the damage done by oxidative stress and glutathione is the body’s most effective self-made antioxidant.  Glutathione is a part of the body’s natural defense against free radical damage.

The following study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure glutathione levels in both healthy individuals and patients with alzheimer’s disease (Mandal PK et. al, 2015).

The researchers found a reduction of glutathione in both the hippocampus and frontal cortex–which are two different areas of the brain–in Alzheimer’s patients.  It is interesting to note that glutathione reduction in those regions correlated with a decline in cognitive function.  The researchers concluded that the study provides compelling evidence that the glutathione levels in specific brain regions are relevant markers for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.  

So how can we ensure that our glutathione levels remain at healthy levels?  One way is to add it into our daily routine via supplementation.  It is now possible to supply glutathione in a bioavailable form–which gets it into the cells where it is needed–and that is by using S-Acetyl Glutathione (Cacciatore et. al., 2010).

The body is making less glutathione as we get older, that happens to everybody, but some are making less than others.

References

Ansari, A, and S W Scheff. “Oxidative Stress in the Progression of Alzheimer Disease in the Frontal Cortex.OUP Academic, Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology , 1 Feb. 2010, academic.oup.com/jnen/article/69/2/155/2917186.

Cacciatore I1, Cornacchia C, Pinnen F, Mollica A, Di Stefano A. “Prodrug approach for increasing cellular glutathione levels.” Molecules, 3 Mar. 2010, https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/15/3/1242

Mandal PK, Saharan S., Tripathi M., and Murari G. “Brain glutathione levels–a novel biomarker for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.” Biol Psychiatry, 15 Nov. 2015,  https://www.sciencedirect.com/ science/article/pii/S0006322315003121

Saharan S., Mandal P.K., “The emerging role of glutathione in Alzheimer’s disease.” J Alzheimers Dis. 23 April 2014. https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad132483

 

 

 

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Not only what we eat but how the food is prepared can either help us or hurt us

Posted by on 7:44 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health Risk, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Advanced glycation end products are compounds that can be found in food and they also can be formed when the food is cooked.

Glycation takes place when sugar reacts with fat and protein, and can also be formed when the blood glucose is high.  

These products accumulate intracellularly and extracellularly in all tissues and body fluids and can cross-link with other proteins and affect their normal functions (Chen JH, et.al., 2018). Glycation end products can interact with specific cell surface receptors and alter intracellular signaling, gene expression, the production of reactive oxygen species and activate several inflammatory pathways.

High levels of these products in the diet as well as in tissues and the circulation are pathogenic to a wide range of diseases.

When glycation end products accumulate in bones and joints, they can contribute to osteoporosis and osteoarthritis and also affect mobility.

Since glycation end products contributes to increased oxidative stress and inflammation, they  also contribute to cardiovascular disease and diabetes (Uribarri J, et.al., 2010).

It’s important to avoid glycation as much as possible, and the these researchers also tested a lot of common foods and the way the preparation of these food affected the accumulation of glycation.

They found that dry cooking at high temperature like frying, grilling and baking was producing the most glycation.

They also documented that animal source protein was higher in these products and the more fat they contained the worse it was.

Plant based foods were the lowest in glycation end products and did not accumulate much of these products when cooked.

The best way was to boil or steam the food, that was less damaging. Marinating food in lemon or vinegar to lower the the ph was also found to reduce glycation.

What else can you do to reduce the damage of glycation?

You can use curcumine which helps reduce free radical damage and inflammation (Yamagishi SI, et.al., 2017).

If you are going to use curcumine, be sure is is in a better absorbed form since regular curcumin is not well absorbed.

References

Chen JH, Lin X, Bu C, Zhang X.Role of advanced glycation end products in mobility and considerations in possible dietary and nutritional intervention strategies. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2018 Oct 10;15:72.

Uribarri J, Woodruff S, Goodman S, Cai W, Chen X, Pyzik R, Yong A, Striker GE, Vlassara H. Advanced glycation end products in foods and a practical guide to their reduction in the dietJ Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jun;110(6):911-16.e12.

Yamagishi SI, Matsui T, Ishibashi Y, Isami F, Abe Y, Sakaguchi T, Higashimoto Y.Yamagishi SI,Phytochemicals Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) and the Receptor System. Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(8):1135-1141

 

 

 

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Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
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Decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk by affecting this nerve

Posted by on 6:35 pm Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Disease, General Health, Health Risk, Risk of death, Stay healthy, Stress | 0 comments

You don’t need any equipment or take any pills to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk.

When a broad range of indicators of vagal function were tested, the researchers of the following study showed that decreased vagal function is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality (Thayer JF, Lane RD, 2007).

The vagus nerve–which is the 10th cranial nerve–is involved in numerous functions and has a big impact on how we feel and function.

How can we affect the vagus nerve?

You can activate the vagus nerve by breathing at a rate of 6 breaths per minute.

Slow and deep breathing with equal duration of inhalation and exhalation for 5 minutes was found to significantly decrease systolic blood pressure (Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, 2011).

It does not take much time to see the benefits from implementing this type of breathing, you notice a difference in the way you feel within some few minutes.

This is diaphragmatic breathing where you see your abdomen rising when you breathe in and lowering as you breathe out.

With some practice you will automatically breathe this way most of the the time, which will make you more relaxed.

References

Bhavanani AB, Sanjay Z, Madanmohan.Immediate effect of sukha pranayama on cardiovascular variables in patients of hypertension.Int J Yoga Therap. 2011;(21):73-6.

Thayer JF, Lane RD.The role of vagal function in the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality.Biol Psychol. 2007 Feb;74(2):224-42.

 

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What type of protein is best if you want to live longer?

Posted by on 7:32 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health Risk, Nut consumption, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Vegetables, Wellness | 0 comments

Does the source of protein really matter as long as we get an adequate supply?

That’s exactly what the researchers of the following study investigated.  85 013 women and 46 329 men, a total of 131342 participants were included in this research (Song M, et.al., 2016).

They examined the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality.

The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein  and 4% for plant protein.

The researchers concluded that high animal protein intake was positively associated with cardiovascular mortality, and high plant protein intake was inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, especially among individuals with at least 1 lifestyle risk factor.

The worst form of protein was processed red meat.

If you want to improve your odds of living longer, plant protein is what you should eat.

A common trait for populations known to live longer, is that they eat very little animal protein, they only do it occasionally.

Research has also documented that we don’t need a lot of protein. It’s a common misconception that we need a Iot, most people in the western world unless they are vegetarians, eat more protein than they need.

If you eat a plant based diet which includes beans, nuts and seeds, you will not get more protein than you need, but you will get enough.

Reference

Song M, Fung TT, Hu FB, Willett WC, Longo VD, Chan AT, Giovannucci EL, Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 1;176(10):1453-1463.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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What factors are playing a role in Alzheimer’s, cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease?

Posted by on 9:58 pm Alzheimer’s, Eating, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Heart disease, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (Gamba P, et.al., 2015).

Levels of  oxysterols derived from cholesterol oxidation and inflammatory mediators have been found to be increased in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients (Testa G, et.al., 2016).

Oxysterols, the major component of oxidized LDL is responsible for the increase in endothelial stiffness and is a key step in atherosclerosis development (Shentu TP, et.al., 2012).

When 70 people with mild cognitive impairment were compared with 140 normal individuals, oxysterol levels were significantly higher in the people with mild cognitive impairment (Liu Q, et.al., 2016).

Where do we find oxidized cholesterol?

Oxidized cholesterol are commonly found in foods with high cholesterol content, such as meat, egg yolk and full fatdairy products (Savage GP, et.al., 2002).

Factors known to increase the production of free radicals and therefore oxidized cholesterol in foods are heat, light, radiation, oxygen, moisture and the storage of food at room temperature.

Processes, such as pre-cooking, freeze-drying, dehydration and irradiation, have all been reported to result in increased production of oxidized cholesterol in meats.

What can you do to reduce oxidized cholesterol?

The most obvious way to do it is to avoid the foods that contain the oxidized cholesterol.

The best way to do that is to eat plant based foods, since animal source protein is where you find oxidized cholesterol.

It would also be beneficial to take S-Acetyl Gutathione and Curcumin to reduce free radical damage and inflammation further.

References

Gamba P, Testa G, Gargiulo S, Staurenghi E, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G.Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Front Aging Neurosci. 2015 Jun 19;7:119.

Liu Q, An Y, Yu H, Lu Y, Feng L, Wang C, Xiao R.Relationship between oxysterols and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: a case-control study.Lipids Health Dis. 2016 Oct 10;15(1):177.

Savage GP1, Dutta PC, Rodriguez-Estrada MT, Cholesterol oxides: their occurrence and methods to prevent their generation in foods. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(1):72-8

Shentu TP, Singh DK, Oh MJ, Sun S, Sadaat L, Makino A, Mazzone T, Subbaiah PV, Cho M, Levitan I.The role of oxysterols in control of endothelial stiffness.J Lipid Res. 2012 Jul;53(7):1348-58.

Testa G, Staurenghi E, Zerbinati C, Gargiulo S, Iuliano L, Giaccone G, Fantò F, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G, Gamba P.Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer’s disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation.Redox Biol. 2016 Dec;10:24-33.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glutathione helps your cells reduce free radical damage and also helps lower inflammation.

BioPro, Inc. Tissue Recovery is using the patented form of S-Acetyl Glutathione from the Italian company that has the patent for S-Acetyl Glutathione.

Click here to get your bottle of the most effective form of glutathione!