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Reduce Inflammation By Adding 1 Food

Posted by on Anti-aging, General Health, Health Risk, Inflammation, Inflammatory factor | 0 comments

You can reduce inflammation by adding just 1 type of food to your diet.

If you also remove another food, you will get even better results.

When a group of type 2 diabetes patients replaced 2 servings of red meat with different types of legumes like lentils, chickpeas, peas and beans for only 3 days per week for 8 weeks, this was the result (Hosseinpour-Niazi S, et.al., 2015).

 

heart shape by various vegetables and fruits

The legumes resulted in significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory markers hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, compared to when they ingested the red meat instead of the legumes.

 

After consuming a legume diet for 6 weeks, comparing it to their regular diet, first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes had significantly reduced levels of hs-CRP (Saraf-Bank F, et.al., 2015).

Women with the highest legume intake had lower levels of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha compared to the ones with the lowest intake (Ezmaillzadeh A, Azakbakht L, 2012).

 

Just by adding beans or lentils to your meals, you can reduce low-grade inflammation significantly.

That is not difficult. Adding beans to a salad is easy, and if you substitute potatoes or rice with beans or lentils, you should notice a nice difference in your inflammatory markers.

Not only will you see a difference there, but most likely you will also see a reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well.

 

 

References:

  1. Hosseinpour-Niazi, S., Mirmiran, P., Fallah-Ghohroudi, A., & Azizi, F. (2015). Non-soya legume-based therapeutic lifestyle change diet reduces inflammatory status in diabetic patients: a randomised cross-over clinical trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 114(2), 213-219.
  2. Saraf-Bank, S., Esmaillzadeh, A., Faghihimani, E., & Azadbakht, L. (2015). Effect of non-soy legume consumption on inflammation and serum adiponectin levels among first-degree relatives of patients with diabetes: A randomized, crossover study. Nutrition, 31(3), 459-465.
  3. Esmaillzadeh, A., & Azadbakht, L. (2012). Legume consumption is inversely associated with serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers among Iranian women. The Journal of nutrition, 142(2), 334-339.

Learn To Eat Program:

Recommendations that work. Foods that can reduce inflammation. This is not a regular diet.

Osteoarthritis in women associated with deposits in Arteries

Posted by on Asthma, Calories, Eating, Energy, Exercise, General Health, General Health, Health Risk, Heart disease, Muscles, Nervous System, Research, Wellness, Women, Womens health | 0 comments

Research sometimes find interesting connections we usually don’t think about.

A study including 3278 women found an association between plaque in the carotid artery and osteoarthritis in the knee and hands in women (Hoeven TA, et.al., 2013).

We know that inflammation is involved in osteoarthritis, even if it is less severe than in rheumatoid arthritis.

We also know that inflammation increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. Inflammation is an important factor in depositing cholesterol and fat into the inner lining of the vascular wall.

 

Another interesting connection found lower magnesium levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to controls (Chavan VU, et.al., 2015).

Lower magnesium levels were also correlated with higher cholesterol and LDL, the so called bad cholesterol, and higher magnesium levels with better HDL cholesterol, the good cholesterol. This was in cases of rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Magnesium has also been found to be inversely associated with osteoarthritis documented on x-rays and joint space narrowing (Zeng C, et.al., 2015).

Glucosamine sulfate another nutritional substance has been used to treat osteoarthritis for many years.

When osteoarthritic chondrocytes (cartilage cells) and glucosamine sulfate were tested in different ways in a culture, it was found that glucosamine sulfate reduced the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (Largo R, et.al., 2003).

Taking magnesium and glucosamine sulfate could according to this possibly benefit both your cardiovascular system and your joints.

The best form of magnesium is an amino acid chelate like magnesium glycinate.

The most common form of magnesium is magnesium oxide, but that is a gastrointestinal irritant and can give you diarrhea when taken in higher amounts.

 

REFERENCE

Chavan, V. U., Ramavataram, D. V. S. S., Patel, P. A., & Rupani, M. P. (2015). Evaluation of serum magnesium, lipid profile and various biochemical parameters as risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of clinical and diagnostic research: JCDR, 9(4), BC01.

Hoeven, T. A., Kavousi, M., Clockaerts, S., Kerkhof, H. J., van Meurs, J. B., Franco, O., … & Bierma-Zeinstra, S. (2012). Association of atherosclerosis with presence and progression of osteoarthritis: the Rotterdam Study. Annals of the rheumatic diseases, annrheumdis-2011.

Largo R, Alvarez-Soria MA, Díez-Ortego I, Calvo E, Sánchez-Pernaute O, Egido J, Herrero-Beaumont G. Glucosamine inhibits IL-1beta-induced NFkappaB activation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003 Apr;11(4):290-8.

Zeng C, Li H, Wei J, Yang T, Deng ZH, Yang Y, Zhang Y, Yang TB, Lei GH. Association between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis. PLoS One. 2015 May 26;10(5):e0127666.

 

 

 

 

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3 Important Benefits of Flax Seeds

Posted by on Anti-Aging, Anti-aging, Antioxidents, Blood Pressure, Bloodsugar, Body fat, Bone density, bone loss, Diabetes, Flaxseeds, General Health, General Health, Glucose, Green tea, Happiness, HDL, HDL Level, Health, Health Risk | 0 comments

 

One of the impressive health benefits of flax seeds is the ability to decrease blood pressure (Rodriguez-Leyva D, et.al., 2013).

In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 30 g of flax seeds daily for 6 months reduced the systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg and the diastolic blood pressure with 7 mm Hg.

 This is as good as some blood pressure medications, and instead of side-effects, you get even additional benefits.

13 g of flax seeds daily has shown to decrease blood glucose and insulin and improve insulin sensitivity in obese individuals with pre-diabetes (Hutchins AM, et.al., 2013).

Flax seeds can also lower cholesterol. 

In just 7 days a drink made of flax seeds lowered total cholesterol by 12% and LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) 15% (Kristensen M, et.al., 2012).

Even if many people are not aware of these health benefits, it’s been known for a long time that flax seeds can reduce total cholesterol, LDL and decrease the blood glucose after a meal (Cunnane SC, et.al., 1993).

 

It is very important to keep the blood glucose in a good range even after a meal, it is not enough to only have good fasting blood glucose.

I recommend grinding 2 tablespoons of flax seeds in a coffee grinder and put them in a glass with water, stir it and drink it thick. You can of course also sprinkle it on food, like a salad if you prefer.

 

References

Cunnane, S. C., Ganguli, S., Menard, C., Liede, A. C., Hamadeh, M. J., Chen, Z. Y., … & Jenkins, D. J. (1993). High α-linolenic acid flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum): some nutritional properties in humansBritish Journal of Nutrition69(2), 443-453.

Hutchins, A. M., Brown, B. D., Cunnane, S. C., Domitrovich, S. G., Adams, E. R., & Bobowiec, C. E. (2013). Daily flaxseed consumption improves glycemic control in obese men and women with pre-diabetes: a randomized study. Nutrition research33(5), 367-375.

Kristensen, M., Jensen, M. G., Aarestrup, J., Petersen, K. E., Søndergaard, L., Mikkelsen, M. S., & Astrup, A. (2012). Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol and increase fecal fat excretion, but the magnitude of the effect depends on food typeNutrition & Metabolism9(1), 8.

Rodriguez-Leyva, D., Weighell, W., Edel, A. L., LaVallee, R., Dibrov, E., Pinneker, R., … & Pierce, G. N. (2013). Potent Antihypertensive Action of Dietary Flaxseed in Hypertensive PatientsNovelty and Significance. Hypertension62(6), 1081-1089.

2 Ways to Increase Your Life Expectancy

Posted by on Anti-Aging, Eating, Health, Health Risk, Nut consumption, Omega-3, fish oil | 0 comments

There are several ways you can increase your life expectancy. I will explain 2 easy ways you can do it based on the research referenced.

 

Often, people overlooked the vascular endothelium when it comes to prevention.

The endothelium is the inner layer of the wall of your blood vessels.

 

Scientists have discovered over the years that the endothelium is much more than just a thin layer of cells. These cells affect and regulate a variety of functions.

 

The endothelium controls the contraction and relaxation of the blood vessels, so it affects the blood circulation.

 

Since good blood flow is important for every tissue in the body, including the heart, it is very important to have healthy endothelial function, especially if you want to increase your life expectancy.

 

The endothelium is directly involved in several serious diseases, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, insulin resistance, kidney failure, tumor growth, metastasis, blood clot formation and severe viral infection (Rajendran P, et.al., 2013).

 

Scientists have known for several years that just a single high fat meal can impair endothelial function for several hours (Vogel RA, et.al., 1997).

 

Increased triglyceride levels (fat) in the blood has shown to decrease vasodilatation from 7.1 to 1.6 (Lundman P, et.al., 1997). This means that the opening up of the blood vessels were decreased significantly.

 

It is interesting and important that not all types of fat will impair endothelial function, it’s mainly saturated fat from animal sources that will do that.

There are also certain fats that will improve the function of your blood vessels.

 

Omega 3 fatty acid supplementation

 

Especially what’s called DHA has shown to reduce vascular inflammation in response to inflammatory triggering compounds, even to bacterial endotoxins, and increase circulation measured as flow mediated dilation (De Caterina R, et.al., 2000, Wang Q, et.al., 2012).

 

If you like nuts you can also do this:

 

Daily ingestion of 56 g of walnuts improved endothelium function in overweight adults (Katz DL, et.al., 2012). Adding the walnuts to the diet did not lead to weight gain.

 

It does not have to be more difficult than that.

 

Just small changes to your daily routine can help increase your life expectancy.


References:

Rajendran, P., Rengarajan, T., Thangavel, J., Nishigaki, Y., Sakthisekaran, D., Sethi, G., & Nishigaki, I. (2013). The vascular endothelium and human diseases. International journal of biological sciences, 9(10), 1057.

Katz, D. L., Davidhi, A., Ma, Y., Kavak, Y., Bifulco, L., & Njike, V. Y. (2012). Effects of walnuts on endothelial function in overweight adults with visceral obesity: a randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 31(6), 415-423.

De Caterina, R., Liao, J. K., & Libby, P. (2000). Fatty acid modulation of endothelial activation. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 71(1), 213S-223S.

Lundman, P., Eriksson, M., Schenck-Gustafsson, K., Karpe, F., & Tornvall, P. (1997). Transient triglyceridemia decreases vascular reactivity in young, healthy men without risk factors for coronary heart disease. Circulation, 96(10), 3266-3268.

Vogel, R. A., Corretti, M. C., & Plotnick, G. D. (1997). Effect of a single high-fat meal on endothelial function in healthy subjects. The American journal of cardiology, 79(3), 350-354.


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How dangerous is sitting?

Posted by on Health Risk | 0 comments

Businesswoman portraitIt is important that the endothelium is healthy, which is the inner lining of the blood vessel wall, and it is also important to have good circulation through those blood vessels.
 

If these factors are compromised the risk for atherosclerosis (clogging of the arteries) will also increase, and you don’t want that.

 
The reviewed research is interesting because it investigated a common reason for decline in circulation and what you can do to prevent it(Thosar SS et al. 2014).

The researchers measured flow mediated dilation (FMD) for the superficial femoral artery. When blood flows through a blood vessel, the vessel will dilate and FMD measures this.

FMD was measured after the participants had been sitting for 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours without getting up. The participants then walked on a treadmill for 5 minutes after they had been sitting for 30 minutes, 1.5 hour and 2.5 hours and the same FMD measurements were performed.

The FMD significantly declined after sitting for 1, 2 and 3 hours, but walking for 5 minutes every hour prevented the decline in FMD.

Just a simple thing like this can make a difference, and depending on the activity, you may not even have to be active for 5 minutes.

 

 

 

Thosar SS, Bielko SL, Mather KJ, Johnston JD, Wallace JP. Effect of Prolonged Sitting and Breaks in Sitting Time on Endothelial Function. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

More on salt, how much do you need?

Posted by on Cardiovascular Disease, General Health, Health Risk, Heart disease, Salt, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

Salt and rosemaryThis research is interesting because it measured sodium and potassium excretion and examined the association between major cardiovascular events and death(O’Donnell M et al. 2014).
Urine samples from 101,945 persons in 17 countries were included in the study with a follow up time of an average 3.7 years. The average estimated sodium excretion was 4.93 g per day and the potassium was 2.12 g per day.

So how does this relate to sodium intake?

Based on the urinary excretion, an estimated sodium intake between 3 g per day and 6 g per day was associated with a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events than was either a higher or a lower intake.

Higher potassium excretion was also associated with lower risks.

These findings are higher than what’s been recommended for sodium intake in the U.S.. The recommendations in the U.S. are now being questioned by many.

 

 

 

O’Donnell M1, Mente A, Rangarajan S, McQueen MJ, Wang X, Liu L, Yan H, Lee SF, Mony P, Devanath A, Rosengren A, Lopez-Jaramillo P, Diaz R, Avezum A, Lanas F, Yusoff K, Iqbal R, Ilow R, Mohammadifard N, Gulec S, Yusufali AH, Kruger L, Yusuf R, Chifamba J, Kabali C, Dagenais G, Lear SA, Teo K, Yusuf S; PURE Investigators. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion, mortality, and cardiovascular events. N Engl J Med. 2014 Aug 14;371(7):612-23. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1311889.