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Support your brain the easy way

Posted by on 7:20 pm Brain, Eating, General Health | 0 comments

This is an easy way to support your brain health.

The sooner you take action to support a healthy brain function the better it is.

In the following study 2313 participants had their brains scanned using MRI and re-scanned 5 years later (Virtanen JK, et.al., 2013). Blood plasma was also measured for fatty acid content.

The researchers found that a higher long-chain omega-3 fatty acid content was associated with better white matter grade and with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts. White matter grade on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a way to evaluate the risk for dementia, stroke and disability (Kuller LH, et.al., 2007).

This is also interesting. When omega-3 fatty acid concentrations are low, B vitamin treatment has no effect on cognitive decline, but when omega-3 levels are in the upper normal range, B vitamins interact to slow cognitive decline (Oulhaj A, et.al., 2016).

It used to be healthy to eat fish. The fish itself and more specifically the omega 3 fat in fish is still healthy, but the problem now is that fish is full of contaminants. Contaminated fish is not healthy, and that’s most likely why some research on fish consumption does not show health benefits.

We do however need omega 3 fatty acids, they are especially important for the brain. A good quality fish oil tested for contaminants with high amounts of EPA and DHA, the active ingredients in fish oil, is an easy way to increase omega 3 fat intake without being exposed to a lot of toxins.

References
Kuller LH1, Arnold AM, Longstreth WT Jr, Manolio TA, O’Leary DH, Burke GL, Fried LP, Newman AB,
White matter grade and ventricular volume on brain MRI as markers of longevity in the cardiovascular health study. Neurobiol Aging. 2007 Sep;28(9):1307-15.

Oulhaj A1, Jernerén F2, Refsum H2,3, Smith AD2, de Jager CA4, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status Enhances the Prevention of Cognitive Decline by B Vitamins in Mild Cognitive Impairment. J Alzheimers Dis.
2016;50(2):547-57.

Virtanen JK, Siscovick DS, Lemaitre RN, Longstreth WT, Spiegelman D, Rimm EB, King IB, Mozaffarian D.Circulating omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study. J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Oct 10;2(5):e000305.

 

Better Fish Oil

The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega 3 fatty acids are well known. Most people that eat a western diet can benefit from increasing the intake of Omega 3 fatty acid. Most fish oils on the market are ethyl esters because that’s cheaper to produce.

The Better Fish Oil comes in the form of triglycerides which offers better stability to the fatty acids and prevents breakdown and oxidation.

Get your bottle here.

Which is better for lowering the risk of dementia, fruit or vegetables?

Posted by on 5:58 pm Brain, Eating, General Health | 0 comments

When several studies including a total of 44004 participants were evaluated for the consumption of fruit and vegetables and their association of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline, this is what the researchers found (Loef M, Walach H, 2012).

Most of the studies found that higher consumption of vegetables, but not fruit is associated with a decreased risk of dementia or cognitive decline. 

Is there anything specific in vegetables that seem to be more important?

The author of this article also stated the following (Johnson EJ, 2012).

An examination of centenarians found a relationship between cognition and lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in the brain tissue.

Zeaxanthin concentrations in brain tissue were significantly related to cognitive function, memory retention, verbal fluency, and dementia severity after adjustment for age, sex, education, hypertension, and diabetes.

Lutein concentrations in the brain were significantly lower in individuals with mild cognitive impairment than in those with normal cognitive function.

Another study also mentioned in this article found that supplementation with 12 mg a day of lutein by itself or in combination with 800 mg of DHA daily for 4-months, in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with older women provided benefits.

Verbal fluency scores improved significantly in the DHA, lutein, and combined-treatment groups. Memory scores and rate of learning also improved significantly in the combined-treatment group.

What kind of vegetables contains the highest amount of zeaxanthin and lutein?

Kale is on top with spinach second.

Put some in your salad and cook some and add it to your dinner.

References
Johnson EJ. A possible role for lutein and zeaxanthin in cognitive function in the elderly. Am J Clin Nutr.
2012 Nov;96(5):1161S-5S.

Loef M, Walach H. Fruit, vegetables and prevention of cognitive decline or dementia: a systematic
review of cohort studies. J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Jul;16(7):626-30. Review.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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What foods affect your memory?

Posted by on 6:09 am Brain, Eating, Health | 0 comments

 

It takes several years before you see the results from the wrong food choices. That’s why it’s better to make changes to the way you eat before you notice symptoms of neurodegeneration like you see in Alzheimer’s disease.

Less serious symptoms like forgetfulness called mild cognitive decline is something to pay attention to.

Start to implement good eating habits avoiding foods that research has found to be contributing to neurodegeneration, and include foods that are beneficial for the nervous system and the brain if it is supported by scientific evidence.

When somebody recommends a certain type of food, be sure there is evidence supporting the benefits of consuming this with a scientific reference, not a reference from the popular press.

There is a lot of believes presented as evidence even by doctors, be a little bit skeptical and read what the references say and see if you agree.

A lot has been written about fat lately, and saturated fat is promoted by many as very healthy and something you should eat a lot of.

The following study evaluated 6,183 older participants and their intake of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (Okereke OI, et.al., 2012).

The participants were tested using several cognitive tests, and their cognitive abilities were related to the type of fat they were consuming.

Higher saturated fat intake was associated with worse cognition.

Higher monounsaturated fat was related to better cognition.

Where do we find saturated fat? The major sources come from animal type fat like meat, cheese and other dairy products.

What other types of food may help your memory?

Vegetables, unsaturated fats, and a high score for the Mediterranean diet were found to reduce the odds ratio for mild cognitive decline (Roberts RO, et.al., 2010).

 

References

Okereke OI, Rosner BA, Kim DH, Kang JH, Cook NR, Manson JE, Buring JE, Willett WC, Grodstein F. Dietary fat types and 4-year cognitive change in community-dwelling older women. Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):124-34.

Roberts RO, Geda YE, Cerhan JR, Knopman DS, Cha RH, Christianson TJ, Pankratz VS, Ivnik RJ, Boeve BF, O’Connor HM, Petersen RC. Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(5):413-23.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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Reduce your risk of heart attacks by adding one food to your meals

Posted by on 9:53 pm Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, Health | 0 comments

 

Research shows adding one food reduces the risk for heart attacks by 38%.

Sometimes you can get big benefits by making small changes.

There are several studies showing that just adding legumes to your meals can lower your cardiovascular risk. The results of this particular study found that only 1 serving of cooked beans per day, which is one third cup, lowered the risk for myocardial infarction with 38% when compared with those eating less than 1 serving per month (Kabagambe EK, et.al., 2005).

Consuming 130 g of beans per day which is slightly more than 1 serving, lowered LDL cholesterol significantly compared to those not eating any beans (Ha V, et.al., 2014).

An average of 19 years follow-up showed that legume consumption 4 times or more per week compared with less than once a week, was associated with a 22% lower risk of coronary heart disease (Bazzano LA,
et.al., 2001).

Beans have also been found to improve circulation in the legs when impaired from a decrease in blood
flow due to the presence of atherosclerotic plaque (Zahradka P, et.al., 2013). When ½ cup of legumes
per day were consumed by participants for 8 weeks, they saw a 5.5% increase of the ankle-brachial
index, with total and LDL-cholesterol reduced by 5.0%. The ankle-brachial index is used to measure
circulation in the legs.

Apparently, you don’t even have to eat a lot of beans to realize these benefits.

References
Bazzano LA, He J, Ogden LG, Loria C, Vupputuri S, Myers L, Whelton PK. Legume consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study.

Ha V, Sievenpiper JL, de Souza RJ, Jayalath VH, Mirrahimi A, Agarwal A, Chiavaroli L, Mejia SB, Sacks FM,
Di Buono M, Bernstein AM, Leiter LA, Kris-Etherton PM, Vuksan V, Bazinet RP, Josse RG, Beyene J, Kendall CW, Jenkins DJ. Effect of dietary pulse intake on established therapeutic lipid targets for cardiovascular risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. CMAJ. 2014 May 13;186(8):E252-62.

Kabagambe EK, Baylin A, Ruiz-Narvarez E, Siles X, Campos H. Decreased consumption of dried mature beans is positively associated with urbanization and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. J Nutr. 2005 Jul;135(7):1770-5. Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 26;161(21):2573-8.

Zahradka P, Wright B, Weighell W, Blewett H, Baldwin A, O K, Guzman RP, Taylor CG. Daily non-soy legume consumption reverses vascular impairment due to peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis. 2013 Oct;230(2):310-4.

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

 

The Danger of Oxidized Cholesterol and How to Avoid It

Posted by on 12:31 am Cardiovascular Disease, Eating, General Health | 0 comments

The danger of oxidized cholesterol and how to avoid it.

Maybe you have read that there is no reason to worry about cholesterol being high, because we need cholesterol, and there is no evidence that it will cause cardiovascular disease.

There is however a lot of evidence showing the danger of certain types of cholesterol. Circulating oxidized LDL cholesterol was found to be associated with all stages of atherosclerosis, from early atherogenesis to hypertension, coronary and peripheral arterial disease, acute coronary syndromes and ischemic cerebral infarction (Trpkovic A, et.al., 2015).

A high waist circumference has been associated with high concentrations of oxidized LDL independently of body mass index (Weinbrenner T, et.al., 2006).

What kind of foods contain oxidized cholesterol?

Eight cholesterol oxides are commonly found in foods with high cholesterol content, such as meat, egg yolk and full fat dairy products (Savage GP, et.al., 2002).

Certain procedures will also increase the oxidation of cholesterol. Heat, light, radiation, oxygen, moisture, low pH, certain pro-oxidizing agents and the storage of food at room temperature will increase the production of cholesterol oxides in foods. Pre-cooking, freeze-drying, dehydration and irradiation, have all been reported to result in increased production of cholesterol oxides in meats. These are methods used by the food industry to prevent bacterial contamination and to increase the shelf life of these products.

How do you reduce your exposure to oxidized cholesterol?

The most effective way is to avoid eating the food where oxidized cholesterol is found.

References
Savage GP1, Dutta PC, Rodriguez-Estrada MT. Cholesterol oxides: their occurrence and methods to prevent their generation in foods. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(1):72-8.
Trpkovic A, Resanovic I, Stanimirovic J, Radak D, Mousa SA, Cenic-Milosevic D, Jevremovic D, Isenovic ER. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein as a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2015;52(2):70-85.
Weinbrenner T, Schröder H, Escurriol V, Fito M, Elosua R, Vila J, Marrugat J, Covas MI. Circulating oxidized LDL is associated with increased waist circumference independent of body mass index in men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):30-5; quiz 181-2.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more

 

Timing your meals is important for your health. Here’s how:

Posted by on 1:00 am Eating, General Health | 0 comments

 

 

 

Time-restricting when you eat can affect your appetite, blood pressure and insulin sensitivity

We tend to focus all our attention on what we eat, and while that is important, when we eat will also have a big impact on our health.

This study evaluated eating earlier in the day to be in alignment with circadian rhythms in metabolism (Sutton EF, et.al., 2108).

The participants were men with prediabetes. They were fed 3 meals either within a 6-hour period were the last meal was eaten before 3:00PM, or they were fed the 3 meals within a 12-hour period.

This was done for 5 weeks, then the schedule was switched so the ones eating within a 6-hour period were switched to the 12-hour period. The diet was kept the same.

When they ate within the 6-hour period, the participants improved their insulin sensitivity, β cell responsiveness, blood pressure, oxidative stress, and appetite.

To be sure that the benefits were not due to weight loss, the participants were given enough food to maintain their weight.

Food intake during a shorter time period without changing the calorie intake can provide metabolic benefits and prevent weight gain (Zarrinpar A, et.al, 2016).

 

References

Sutton EF, Beyl R, Early KS, Cefalu WT, Ravussin E, Peterson CM. Early Time-Restricted Feeding Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Blood Pressure, and Oxidative Stress Even without Weight Loss in Men with Prediabetes. Cell Metab. 2018 May 8. pii: S1550-4131(18)30253-5.

Zarrinpar A, Chaix A, Panda S. Daily Eating Patterns and Their Impact on Health and Disease. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Feb;27(2):69-83.

 

Learn to Eat Program


 Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more