Your Road to Wellness

Eating

When is it easier for your body to transfer blood glucose from a meal into your cells?

Posted by on 9:00 am Bloodsugar, Eating, Glucose, High glycemic index | 0 comments

glucose level

 

We know it’s better to avoid high blood glucose levels since that can cause tissue damage.

Several things can affect blood glucose levels, one important factor is the type of food we eat.

 

It’s logical that the food we eat will have an impact on our blood glucose level, but can it also make a difference when we eat?

Yes, it can make a difference. Research has shown that the circadian rhythm which is affected by the light cycle regulates glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in humans (Poggiogalle E, et.al., 2018).

 

 

We have known for many years that the body metabolizes glucose differently in the morning compared to the evening.

When the participants of this study received three oral glucose tolerance tests, one in the morning, one in the afternoon, and one in the evening on separate days, this is what the researchers found (Jarrett RJ, et.al., 1972).

The average blood sugar levels in the afternoon and evening tests were similar, but they were both significantly higher than those in the morning test.

 

For somebody who already has a tendency to have high blood glucose levels, it’s even more important to take this into consideration when eating.

These researchers found that glycemic control was dramatically impaired in the evening in people with prediabetes (Sonnier T, et.al., 2014).

 

glycemic index

 

Most people would benefit by keeping this in mind when eating.

We will usually metabolize a meal better and keep the blood glucose levels lower in the morning.

This is one of the reasons why it’s better to eat more in the morning and less in the evening.

 

References:

 

Jarrett RJ, Baker IA, Keen H, Oakley NW..Diurnal variation in oral glucose tolerance: blood sugar and plasma insulin levels morning, afternoon, and evening.Br Med J. 1972 Jan 22;1(5794):199-201.

 

Poggiogalle E, Jamshed H, Peterson CM.Circadian regulation of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in humans.Metabolism. 2018 Jul;84:11-27.

 

Sonnier T, Rood J, Gimble JM, Peterson CM.Glycemic control is impaired in the evening in prediabetes through multiple diurnal rhythms. J Diabetes Complications. 2014 Nov-Dec;28(6):836-43.

Why you don’t want to eat food that results in high blood glucose levels?

Posted by on 9:00 am Bloodsugar, Diet, Eating | 0 comments

low glycemic food

 

We know that diabetes can lead to serious complications because of elevated blood glucose
levels.
We don’t, however, have to be diagnosed with diabetes to be exposed to the negative effects of
elevated blood glucose.
What is called protein glycation and formation of advanced glycation end products play an
an important role in diabetic complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and
cardiomyopathy and also other diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and aging
(Singh VP, et.al., 2014).

 

 

Glycation of proteins takes place when glucose reacts with proteins because it is
causing damage.
Advanced glycation end products, is formed when we have high blood glucose levels and is
causing inflammation and endothelial damage (de Vries MA, et.al., 2014).
The endothelium is the inner layer of the blood vessel wall.
Eating food with a high glycemic index leads to the quick and high elevation of your blood glucose.
This results in acute inflammation causing endothelial dysfunction which may be one of the
earliest events forming atherosclerosis.
Processed food, bread, cookies, candy, and ice cream are some examples of high glycemic
index food.

 

glycemic index

A plant-based diet tends to have a lower glycemic index if you are careful with potatoes,
processed grains, and very sweet fruit. Beans and lentils are examples of lower glycemic index
carbohydrates which will also lower the glycemic index of a meal since they slow down the
absorption of the glucose from grains.

 

References:

de Vries MA, Klop B, Janssen HW, Njo TL, Westerman EM, Castro Cabezas M. Postprandial
inflammation: targeting glucose and lipids. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2014;824:161-70.
Singh VP, Bali A, Singh N, Jaggi AS. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic
complications. Korean J Physiol Pharmacol. 2014 Feb;18(1):1-14.

How to reduce your blood pressure by eating earlier

Posted by on 8:00 am Blood Pressure, Eating | 0 comments

blood pressure

 

Maybe you find it surprising that you can reduce your blood pressure just by changing the time
you eat. You can however not only reduce your blood pressure by doing that, but quite a few
other things have been shown to improve as well.
This research was based on the results of intermittent fasting.
The study was small, but it was very well controlled (Sutton EF, et.al., 2018).
Prediabetic men were randomized to time-restricted feeding, which in this case meant a 6 hour
feeding period with dinner before 3 p.m., or a control schedule with a 12 hour feeding period.
The participants followed the time-restricted feeding schedule for 5 weeks and were later crossed
over to the other schedule.

 

 

The meals they ingested were prepared for them, and the number of daily calories was
calculated according to their energy expenditure so they would not lose any weight. The
researchers also checked that all of the meals were ingested. The schedules were followed for
5 weeks. The participants had breakfast, lunch and dinner, all within 6 hours, and dinner was no later than 3 p.m.

 

eating schedule

 

On the time-restricted feeding schedule, the participants improved insulin sensitivity, beta
cell responsiveness, blood pressure, oxidative stress, and they felt less hungry.
Beta cells are the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.
All of these changes were seen from only changing the timing of when they were eating.
Try it and see how it works for you.

 

Reference:

Sutton EF1, Beyl R1, Early KS2, Cefalu WT3, Ravussin E1, Peterson CM , Early Time-Restricted
Feeding Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Blood Pressure, and Oxidative Stress Even without Weight
Loss in Men with Prediabetes. Cell Metab. 2018 Jun 5;27(6):1212-1221.e3.

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Research, Stay healthy | 0 comments

 

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

 

 

This research was conducted to investigate the effect on cardiovascular risk factors using only
food (McDougall J, et.al., 2014).
1615 people participated in this research.
The protocol was implemented for only 7 days, and measurements of weight, blood pressure,
blood sugar, and blood lipids were measured at the start of the study and 7 days later.
The participants consumed a low-fat (≤10% of calories), high-carbohydrate (~80% of calories),
plant-based diet.
Most antihypertensive and antihyperglycemic medications were reduced or discontinued at the
beginning of the study.

 

 

After 7 days the average weight loss was 1.4 kg, total cholesterol decreased by an
average of 29 mg/dl, systolic blood pressure decreased on average by 18 mm Hg,
diastolic blood pressure by an average of 10 mm Hg, and blood glucose by an average of
11 mg/dL.

 

 

This was implementing a plant-based vegan diet.
Most people think it will take quite a while to see changes in laboratory tests from dietary
changes, but as you can see, that is not the case at all. You just have to follow an effective
protocol.

Reference:

McDougall J1, Thomas LE, McDougall C, Moloney G, Saul B, Finnell JS, Richardson K,
Petersen KM. Effects of 7 days on an ad libitum low-fat vegan diet: the McDougall Program
cohort. Nutr J. 2014 Oct 14;13:99. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-13-99.

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low fat diet?

Posted by on 8:31 am Body fat, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

 

 

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low-fat diet?

 

Research has compared these different approaches a while back, and we have had the results for a while. The reason why they’re still are questions about the best approach is probably that there are many ways to lose weight, and especially a high-fat diet also called a ketogenic diet has been promoted as a solution to almost everything including weight loss.

What did the research show when it comes to cardiovascular risk?

The participants of this study completed each 4-week diet intervention with a 4 week washout period between each approach (Miller M, et.al., 2009).

 

 

Food records were analyzed, fasting blood samples, and brachial artery reactivity testing was performed. During the Mediterranean and the high carbohydrate, low-fat diets maintenance phase, there were significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL).

For the Mediterranean diet the LDL decreased 11.8%, and for the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet the LDL decreased by 16.6%.

The LDL increased on the high-fat diet.

CRP, an inflammatory marker decreased the most on the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet and increased on the high-fat diet.

 

 

Brachial artery testing revealed an inverse correlation between flow-mediated vasodilatation and intake of saturated fat. This means decreased vasodilation with increased fat intake.

The science does not back up the promoted benefits of a high-fat diet.

According to the research, a high-fat diet increases cardiovascular risk.

It is, however, important to remember that not all carbohydrates are equal.

Avoid processed high glycemic index carbohydrates, and increase the intake of plant-based food.

 

 

Reference:

Miller M1, Beach V, Sorkin JD, Mangano C, Dobmeier C, Novacic D, Rhyne J, Vogel RA. Comparative effects of three popular diets on lipids, endothelial function, and C-reactive protein during weight maintenance.J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Apr;109(4):713-7.

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

Is there an easy way to reduce inflammation without causing side effects?

Posted by on 11:12 am Diet, Eating, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

Can you just implement one simple thing to help reduce inflammation?  You actually can and it is not taking an anti-inflammatory drug. What I’m talking about you can buy it in a regular grocery store.

Low grade inflammation is inflammation you may not be aware of because it does not result in any visible signs like when you sprain an ankle.

It can however be measured with a blood test. 

This type of inflammation is a risk factor for all kinds of chronic diseases from cardiovascular disease to arthritis.

The most effective way to reduce this type of inflammation is to make changes to the way you eat. You can also take certain nutritional supplements to reduce the inflammation further.

This research is however showing that by just adding one food to your diet, inflammation was reduced (Esmaillzadeh A, Azadbakht L, 2012).

486 female teachers were included in the research. These women were tested for several inflammatory markers, and their dietary intake were assessed.

The researchers found that legume intake was inversely associated with serum concentrations of highly sensitive CRP, TNFα, and IL-6, all inflammatory markers, even after controlling for potential confounders and dietary variables.

According to this research, higher intake of legumes were found to reduce inflammation.

This is easy to accomplish if you add either beans or lentils to salads, soups, and stews. It would make a nice difference if you started to use legumes instead of potatoes and rice. 

You can either cook the beans yourself, or buy organic canned beans. For this to work you need to always have some cooked beans on hand, either in the refrigerator or in a can. That way you can easily add them to a meal.

Reference

Esmaillzadeh A, Azadbakht L, Legume consumption is inversely associated with serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers among Iranian women. J Nutr. 2012 Feb;142(2):334-9.

 

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

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