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Your Road to Wellness

Cholesterol

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Research, Stay healthy | 0 comments

 

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

 

 

This research was conducted to investigate the effect on cardiovascular risk factors using only
food (McDougall J, et.al., 2014).
1615 people participated in this research.
The protocol was implemented for only 7 days, and measurements of weight, blood pressure,
blood sugar, and blood lipids were measured at the start of the study and 7 days later.
The participants consumed a low-fat (≤10% of calories), high-carbohydrate (~80% of calories),
plant-based diet.
Most antihypertensive and antihyperglycemic medications were reduced or discontinued at the
beginning of the study.

 

 

After 7 days the average weight loss was 1.4 kg, total cholesterol decreased by an
average of 29 mg/dl, systolic blood pressure decreased on average by 18 mm Hg,
diastolic blood pressure by an average of 10 mm Hg, and blood glucose by an average of
11 mg/dL.

 

 

This was implementing a plant based vegan diet.
Most people think it will take quite a while to see changes on laboratory tests from dietary
changes, but as you can see, that is not the case at all. You just have to follow an effective
protocol.

Reference:

McDougall J1, Thomas LE, McDougall C, Moloney G, Saul B, Finnell JS, Richardson K,
Petersen KM. Effects of 7 days on an ad libitum low-fat vegan diet: the McDougall Program
cohort. Nutr J. 2014 Oct 14;13:99. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-13-99.

Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

Posted by on 8:39 am Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Lose fat, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

 

Is a high fat, ketogenic diet good for your cardiovascular system?

 

Let’s see what science says about the effect of the ketogenic diet on the cardiovascular system.
The goal of this study was to measure changes in glucose, lipid, and inflammation (Rosenbaum
M, et al., 2019).
17 men were put on a baseline control diet for 4 weeks and then switched to a ketogenic diet for
4 weeks.
This is what the researchers found.
Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein were significantly
increased on the ketogenic diet.
These are all cardiovascular disease risk markers. Especially LDL cholesterol and C-reactive
protein which is an inflammatory marker.

 

 

Flow-mediated dilation is another indicator of vascular health.
In this study, obese participants were either consuming high fat or low-fat meals for 6 weeks
(Varady KA, et al., 2011).
After 6 weeks, flow-mediated dilation improved in the low-fat group with a 32% increase and was
impaired in the high-fat group with a 19% reduction.
When 42 participants consumed a ketogenic diet for 6 week LDL cholesterol increased
significantly with 10.7% (Urbain P, et al., 2017).

 

 

Research, in general, has shown an increase in LDL cholesterol with a high-fat diet.
Negative effects on the cardiovascular system seem to be a concern with high-fat diets even if
some people may respond more favorably to a ketogenic diet than others.

References:

Rosenbaum M, Hall KD, Guo J, Ravussin E, Mayer LS, Reitman ML, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Leibel
RL, Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis and Inflammation in Humans Following an Isocaloric
Ketogenic Diet. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Jun;27(6):971-981.

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H, Impact of a 6-week
non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical
parameters in healthy adults. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17.

Varady KA, Bhutani S, Klempel MC, Phillips SA. Improvements in vascular health by a low-fat
diet, but not a high-fat diet, are mediated by changes in adipocyte biology. Nutr J. 2011 Jan
20;10:8.

 

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

 

Oxidised cholesterol and Alzheimer’s disease

Posted by on 6:46 am Alzheimer’s, Cholesterol | 0 comments

 

Increasing evidence is now supporting the hypothesis that oxidized cholesterol is the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease and oxysterols, which are the oxidized form of cholesterol, are the link connecting the disease to altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain and to high cholesterol; this is because of the ability of oxysterols, unlike cholesterol, to cross the blood brain barrier (Gamba, et.al., 2015).

 

 

Oxidative stress is associated with neuroinflammation, and a vicious circle has been found to connect oxidative stress and inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Analysis of published data shows that the levels of cholesterol are increased in people with mild cognitive impairment,  and 24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are elevated in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment compared to controls (Wang, et.al., 2016).

24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are types of oxysterols.

The following research found that study participants with mild cognitive impairment had significantly higher levels of 27-hydroxycholesterol when compared to participants with normal cognition (Liu Q, et.al., 2016).

It may look like taking statin drugs to lower cholesterol could be a solution to prevent memory loss later in life, but that does not work.

 

In this study the authors concluded that there is good evidence that statins given in late life to people at risk of vascular disease do not prevent cognitive decline or dementia (McGuinness B, et.al., 2016).

 

Dietary changes are a better choice.

 

This research indicated that adherence to the meditranean diet was associated with better cognitive performance and lower dementia rates (Anastasiou CA, et.al., 2017).

 

References:

 

Anastasiou CA, Yannakoulia M, Kosmidis MH, Dardiotis E, Hadjigeorgiou GM, Sakka P, Arampatzi X, Bougea A, Labropoulos I, Scarmeas N, Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet.PLoS One. 2017 Aug 1;12(8):e0182048.

 

Gamba P, Testa G, Gargiulo S, Staurenghi E, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G.Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease.Front Aging Neurosci. 2015 Jun 19;7:119. 

 

Liu Q, An Y, Yu H, Lu Y, Feng L, Wang C, Xiao R.Relationship between oxysterols and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: a case-control study.Lipids Health Dis. 2016 Oct 10;15(1):177.

 

McGuinness B1, Craig D, Bullock R, Passmore P.Statins for the prevention of dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Jan 4;(1):CD003160.

Wang HL, Wang YY, Liu XG, Kuo SH, Liu N, Song QY, Wang MW.Cholesterol, 24-Hydroxycholesterol, and 27-Hydroxycholesterol as Surrogate Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Meta-Analysis.J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;51(1):45-55.

 

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Can a simple thing like this help us stay healthier as we get older?

Posted by on 2:29 pm Anti-Aging, Cholesterol, Fish Oil, Flaxseeds, General Health, Low glycemic meals, Omega-3, fish oil, Research, Stay healthy, Supplements | 0 comments

There is not much point in living a very long life if we don’t feel and function good.  So what can you do to improve your odds of staying healthy? A low glycemic index, high nutrient plant based diet and regular exercise would help you do that, but you probably already know that.

According to this research it can be quite easy to improve your odds of staying healthy as you get older by just adding one simple thing (Lai HT, et.al., 2018).  The study participants were 2622 adults with an average age of 74.4 years. They were healthy at the start of the study and were followed for 15 years.

The phospholipids of omega 3 fatty acids from both plant sources and seafood were measured in the blood.  The results showed that higher levels of long chain omega 3 fatty acids from seafood were associated with an 18% lower risk of unhealthy ageing.  The researchers wrote that the findings support guidelines for increased dietary consumption of omega 3 fatty acids.

You can eat fish a couple of times a week, but fish is getting more and more polluted.  You can, however, decrease your exposure to these pollutants and instead use high quality fish oil capsules which has been verified to contain lower levels of pollutants.

You can raise your blood levels of omega 3 fatty acids by taking capsules as long as it is a product that has high enough levels of these fatty acids, it’s not more difficult than that.

Reference

Lai HT, de Oliveira Otto MC, Lemaitre RN, McKnight B, Song X, King IB, Chaves PH, Odden MC, Newman AB, Siscovick DS, Mozaffarian D. Serial circulating omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and healthy ageing among older adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2018 Oct 17;363:k4067.

 

 

Better Fish Oil

The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega 3 fatty acids are well known. Most people that eat a western diet can benefit from increasing the intake of Omega 3 fatty acid. Most fish oils on the market are ethyl esters because that’s cheaper to produce.

The Better Fish Oil comes in the form of triglycerides which offers better stability to the fatty acids and prevents breakdown and oxidation.

Get your bottle here.

Do normal LDL cholesterol levels protect us from cardiovascular disease?

Posted by on 10:48 am Blood Pressure, Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diseases, Eating, Fat, General Health, HDL, HDL Level, Health, Health Risk, Heart disease | 0 comments

The correct term for LDL is Low-Density Lipoprotein and it is also called the “bad cholesterol” because LDL tends to create plaque in the arteries and atherosclerosis.

There are however different opinions about the risk of cholesterol and LDL.

I think you will find the following research data interesting.

What most laboratories are reporting as normal for LDL cholesterol are values below 99 mg/dl and it used to be even higher than that.

Let’s take a closer look at that. What do so-called “normal” people die from?

They die from cardiovascular disease in western societies. Knowing that, do you really want to be normal?

The normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol range is 50 to 70 mg/dl for native hunter-gatherers, healthy human babies, free-living primates, and other wild mammals (all of whom do not develop atherosclerosis (O’Keefe JH Jr, et.al., 2004).

The same researchers stated that no major safety concerns have surfaced in studies that lowered LDL to this range of 50 to 70 mg/dl.

There is a consistent relative risk reduction in major vascular events in patient populations starting as low as an average of 63 mg/dL and achieving levels as low as a median of 21 mg/dL, with no observed offsetting adverse effects (Sabatine MS, et.al., 2018).

The only factor required to cause atherosclerosis is cholesterol (Benjamin MM, Roberts W, 2013).

Other factors like genetics (1 in 500), cigarette smoking, diabetes, overweight, inactivity and stress will not by themselves form plaque. They will, however, contribute to and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease if cholesterol and LDL are elevated. This is according to what Benjamin MM and Roberts W reported at the at the 39th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease.

What can you do to keep cholesterol and LDL low?

A low glycemic index, high nutrient, plant based diet will do that for most people.  Statin drugs will also do it, but it is preferable to use food.

References

Benjamin MM, Roberts WC.Facts and principles learned at the 39th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease.Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2013 Apr;26(2):124-36

O’Keefe JH Jr, Cordain L, Harris WH, Moe RM, Vogel R.Optimal low-density lipoprotein is 50 to 70 mg/dl: lower is better and physiologically normal.J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Jun 2;43(11):2142-6.

Sabatine MS, Wiviott SD, Im K, Murphy SA, Giugliano RP.Efficacy and Safety of Further Lowering of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Patients Starting With Very Low Levels: A Meta-analysis. JAMA Cardiol. 2018 Sep 1;3(9):823-828.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

 

 

Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…