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Your Road to Wellness

Body fat

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low fat diet?

Posted by on 8:31 am Body fat, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

 

 

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low-fat diet?

 

Research has compared these different approaches a while back, and we have had the results for a while. The reason why they’re still are questions about the best approach is probably that there are many ways to lose weight, and especially a high-fat diet also called a ketogenic diet has been promoted as a solution to almost everything including weight loss.

What did the research show when it comes to cardiovascular risk?

The participants of this study completed each 4-week diet intervention with a 4 week washout period between each approach (Miller M, et.al., 2009).

 

 

 

Food records were analyzed, fasting blood samples, and brachial artery reactivity testing was performed. During the Mediterranean and the high carbohydrate, low-fat diets maintenance phase, there were significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL).

For the Mediterranean diet the LDL decreased 11.8%, and for the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet the LDL decreased by 16.6%.

The LDL increased on the high-fat diet.

CRP, an inflammatory marker decreased the most on the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet and increased on the high-fat diet.

 

 

Brachial artery testing revealed an inverse correlation between flow-mediated vasodilatation and intake of saturated fat. This means decreased vasodilation with increased fat intake.

The science does not back up the promoted benefits of a high-fat diet.

According to the research, a high-fat diet increases cardiovascular risk.

It is, however, important to remember that not all carbohydrates are equal.

Avoid processed high glycemic index carbohydrates, and increase the intake of plant-based food.

 

 

Reference:

Miller M1, Beach V, Sorkin JD, Mangano C, Dobmeier C, Novacic D, Rhyne J, Vogel RA. Comparative effects of three popular diets on lipids, endothelial function, and C-reactive protein during weight maintenance.J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Apr;109(4):713-7.

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood triglycerides, Body fat, Body mass index, Diet, Eating, Exercise, Fat, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Muscles, Sports performance, The Learn to Eat Plan, Weight loss | 0 comments

ketogenic diet

 

How does a high fat, ketogenic diet affect your muscles?

 

There is a lot of promotion and talk about the benefits of restricting carbohydrate intake and eating a high fat, ketogenic diet.

When you read things like that, always ask, where is the evidence? Is there any science supporting the claims?

There is agreement on that more lean muscle mass and a lower body fat percentage are beneficial. This is true for everybody, but especially athletes.

Before you go on a high-fat diet, you want to know how a regime like that will affect your lean muscle mass.

The following research included 42 healthy individuals that followed a ketogenic diet for 6 weeks consisting of the same calorie intake as their regular diet (Urbain P, et.al., 2017).

They were tested for several things at the start of the study and after 6 weeks.

 

 

VO2peak and peak power decreased after the ketogenic diet.

The participants lost equal amounts of fat and fat-free mass, which means they lost some muscle mass.

Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol increased significantly, LDL by 10.7% which is quite a lot, especially since LDL is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Glucose, insulin, and IGF-1 (a growth factor) dropped significantly by 3.0, 22.2 and 20.2%.

Another non-significant change was also seen.

 

ketogenic diet 2

 

Similar results were found when seventeen overweight or obese men were admitted to metabolic wards where they consumed a high-carbohydrate baseline diet for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of a ketogenic diet (Hall KD, et.al., 2016).

 

Body fat loss slowed during the ketogenic diet and coincided with increased protein utilization and loss of fat-free mass. These participants also lost muscle mass, and this study was done under very strict control.

 

Apparently a high-fat diet is not producing the amazing results some would want you to believe.

 

References

 

Hall KD, Chen KY, Guo J, Lam YY, Leibel RL, Mayer LE, Reitman ML, Rosenbaum M, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Ravussin E. Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):324-33.

 

Urbain P, Strom L, Morawski L, Wehrle A, Deibert P, Bertz H.Impact of a 6-week non-energy-restricted ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and biochemical parameters in healthy adults.Nutr Metab (Lond). 2017 Feb 20;14:17

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides

Do normal LDL cholesterol levels protect us from cardiovascular disease?

Posted by on 10:48 am Blood Pressure, Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diseases, Eating, Fat, General Health, HDL, HDL Level, Health, Health Risk, Heart disease | 0 comments

The correct term for LDL is Low-Density Lipoprotein and it is also called the “bad cholesterol” because LDL tends to create plaque in the arteries and atherosclerosis.

There are however different opinions about the risk of cholesterol and LDL.

I think you will find the following research data interesting.

What most laboratories are reporting as normal for LDL cholesterol are values below 99 mg/dl and it used to be even higher than that.

Let’s take a closer look at that. What do so-called “normal” people die from?

They die from cardiovascular disease in western societies. Knowing that, do you really want to be normal?

The normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol range is 50 to 70 mg/dl for native hunter-gatherers, healthy human babies, free-living primates, and other wild mammals (all of whom do not develop atherosclerosis (O’Keefe JH Jr, et.al., 2004).

The same researchers stated that no major safety concerns have surfaced in studies that lowered LDL to this range of 50 to 70 mg/dl.

There is a consistent relative risk reduction in major vascular events in patient populations starting as low as an average of 63 mg/dL and achieving levels as low as a median of 21 mg/dL, with no observed offsetting adverse effects (Sabatine MS, et.al., 2018).

The only factor required to cause atherosclerosis is cholesterol (Benjamin MM, Roberts W, 2013).

Other factors like genetics (1 in 500), cigarette smoking, diabetes, overweight, inactivity and stress will not by themselves form plaque. They will, however, contribute to and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease if cholesterol and LDL are elevated. This is according to what Benjamin MM and Roberts W reported at the at the 39th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease.

What can you do to keep cholesterol and LDL low?

A low glycemic index, high nutrient, plant based diet will do that for most people.  Statin drugs will also do it, but it is preferable to use food.

References

Benjamin MM, Roberts WC.Facts and principles learned at the 39th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease.Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2013 Apr;26(2):124-36

O’Keefe JH Jr, Cordain L, Harris WH, Moe RM, Vogel R.Optimal low-density lipoprotein is 50 to 70 mg/dl: lower is better and physiologically normal.J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Jun 2;43(11):2142-6.

Sabatine MS, Wiviott SD, Im K, Murphy SA, Giugliano RP.Efficacy and Safety of Further Lowering of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Patients Starting With Very Low Levels: A Meta-analysis. JAMA Cardiol. 2018 Sep 1;3(9):823-828.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

 

 

Is fat from dairy like butter and cheese decreasing or increasing cardiovascular risk?

Posted by on 9:25 am Body fat, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, Fat, General Health, Stay healthy, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog, Wellness | 0 comments

Fat from butter and cheese is mainly saturated fat. We used to be warned about saturated fat and it was recommended to reduce the intake of saturated fat because it increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Now many are recommending to eat saturated fat claiming it is healthy, and that it will not increase cardiovascular risk.
So what does the science say?

When 43,652 men and 87907 women and another 90675 women were followed for several years, a total of 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, this was the results (Chen M, et.al., 2016).

The replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with an equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fat was associated with 24% reduction in cardiovascular risk. You find polyunsaturated fat in some fish like salmon, nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Are all saturated fats producing the same results? This is the results when extra virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and unsalted butter were compared (Khaw KT, et.al., 2018).

LDL cholesterol was significantly increased on butter compared with coconut oil and olive oil. LDL is the harmful lipoprotein and is associated with increase cardiovascular risk.

It’s interesting while coconut oil is a source of saturated fat, it did not increase LDL like butter.  The coconut oil needs to be processed in such a way that the nutrients are still intact because there is other research showing it may increase LDL.

References

Chen M, Li Y, Sun Q, Pan A, Manson JE, Rexrode KM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Hu FB.Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults.Am J Clin Nov;104(5):1 209-1217. Nutr.2016 Nov;104(5):1209-1217.

Khaw KT, Sharp SJ, Finikarides L, Afzal I, Lentjes M, Luben R, Forouhi NG.Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.BMJ Open. 2018 Mar 6;8(3):e020167.

 

 

Learn to Eat Program

Based on the most effective scientific strategies, this program was created to help
you reduce inflammation and feel great.

Read more…

Can Omega 3 Fatty Acids Affect Your Mood?

Posted by on 11:42 am Body fat, Fish Oil, General Health, Omega-3, fish oil, Stay healthy, Stress, Wellness, Womens health | 0 comments

Omega 3 fatty acids have been demonstrated to significantly influence the nervous system and affect brain structures.

Can omega 3 fat also impact the way you feel emotionally?

This was evaluated in young adults with depressive symptoms by giving them 1.4 g of EPA and DHA, the active ingredients of omega 3 fat, or a placebo (Ginty AT, Conclin SM, 2015).

The participants took the omega 3 fatty acids for 21 days, and the results showed a significant difference between the treatment group and the placebo group.

67% of the participant taking the omega 3 fatty acids no longer met the criteria for being depressed, while only 20% in the placebo group were no longer depressed.

 

When medical students were given either 2085 mg of EPA and 348 mg of DHA or a placebo, the ones who received the omega 3 fatty acids experienced a 20% reduction in anxiety symptoms and a 14% reduction in IL-6 and TNF-alpha, both markers of inflammation (Kiecolt-Glaser JK et.al., 2011).

 

The fatty acid composition of the red blood cells in patients with recurrent major depression was found to be significantly lower in the patients compared to the control group without depression ( Assies J, et.al., 2010).

 

According to these studies, just by taking some capsules of a high-quality omega 3 fish oil daily, you should see a positive effect on your mood.

 

References

Assies J, Pouwer F, Lok A, Mocking RJ, Bockting CL, Visser I, Abeling NG, Duran M, Schene AH Plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid patterns in patients with recurrent depression: a matched case-control study. PLoS One. 2010 May 14;5(5):e10635.

Ginty AT, Conklin SM. Short-term supplementation of acute long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may alter depression status and decrease symptomology among young adults with depression: A preliminary randomized and placebo controlled trial.
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Sep 30;229(1-2):485-9.

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Belury MA, Andridge R, Malarkey WB, Glaser R. Omega-3 supplementation lowers inflammation and anxiety in medical students: a randomized controlled trial. Brain Behav Immun. 2011 Nov;25(8):1725-34.

 

Better Fish Oil

The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega 3 fatty acids are well known. Most people that eat a western diet can benefit from increasing the intake of Omega 3 fatty acid since their diet usually contains too much Omega 6 from vegetable oils and saturated fat from dairy and other animal sources

Read more.. 

Change The Structure Of Your Brain And Improve Your Memory With This Fat

Posted by on 11:29 am Body fat, Fat, Fish Oil, General Health, Memory, Omega-3, fish oil, Stay healthy | 0 comments

 

You may think it sounds too good to be true to be able to change your brain structure by only eating a certain type of fat.

The following research is however of very high-quality and included structural neuroimaging, cognitive performance testing, vascular markers and additional blood tests (Witte AV, et.al., 2014).

65 healthy participants 50 to 75 years took either fish oil or a placebo for 26 weeks.

 

The results showed a significant increase in executive function after taking the fish oil for 26 weeks when compared to the placebo.

Even more interesting, the fish oil had beneficial effects on white matter microstructural integrity and gray matter volume.

Not only that, it also had beneficial effects on the carotid intima media thickness and diastolic blood pressure.

The carotid intima media is the inner layer of the blood vessel wall.

How much fish oil did they take?

They only took 2.2 g a day to get all those benefits.

 

If you want to add more things which will have a beneficial effect on your brain structure, you can add aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation.

The participant in this study had mild cognitive impairment.

Compared to the control group, the participants taking an omega-3 fatty acid supplement and participating in aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation increased or preserved gray matter volume (Kobe T, et.al., 2016).

Gray matter volume decreased in the control group.

Sometimes you don’t have to make a lot of changes to get a lot of benefits.

 

 

References

Köbe T, Witte AV, Schnelle A, Lesemann A, Fabian S, Tesky VA, Pantel J, Flöel A. Combined omega-3 fatty acids, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation prevents decline in gray matter volume of the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Neuroimage. 2016 May 1;131:226-38.

Witte AV, Kerti L, Hermannstädter HM, Fiebach JB, Schreiber SJ, Schuchardt JP, Hahn A, Flöel A,

Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids improve brain function and structure in older adults.
Cereb Cortex. 2014 Nov;24(11):3059-68.

 

 

Better Fish Oil

The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega 3 fatty acids are well known. Most people that eat a western diet can benefit from increasing the intake of Omega 3 fatty acid since their diet usually contains too much Omega 6 from vegetable oils and saturated fat from dairy and other animal sources.

READ MORE…