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Arthritis

This has Shown to Improve Memory, and it is Easy to Implement

Posted by on Alzheimer’s, Arthritis, Brain, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, General Health, Health, Inflammation, Memory | 0 comments

Image result for low grade inflammationLow grade inflammation, the type of inflammation you usually don’t know you have, is harmful for all tissue, including the brain. Curcumin found in the spice turmeric has been shown to decrease inflammation and was for that reason studied to determine if it could provide protection for the brain.

40 participants were given either curcumin in a bioavailable form twice daily or a placebo for 18 months (Small GW, et.al., 2018). The participants did not have dementia, and the researchers found that taking curcumin twice daily, improved their memory and attention.

PET scanning suggested that the improvements were associated with a decrease in amyloid and tau accumulation in brain areas regulating mood and memory. Image result for amyloid and tau alzheimers brain

Amyloid and tau accumulation are usually found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Earlier research with another bioavailable form of curcumin showed that 1 hour after taking the curcumin, the participants experienced significant improvement in attention and working memory (Cox KH, et.al., 2015).

Taking a capsule twice a day is very easy and something everybody can do.

References
Small GW1, Siddarth P2, Li Z2, Miller KJ2, Ercoli L2, Emerson ND2, Martinez J2, Wong KP2, Liu J2, Merrill DA2, Chen ST2, Henning SM2, Satyamurthy N2, Huang SC2, Heber D2, Barrio JR2. Memory and Brain Amyloid and Tau Effects of a Bioavailable Form of Curcumin in Non-Demented Adults: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 18-Month Trial. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Mar;26(3):266 277.

Cox KH1, Pipingas A1, Scholey AB2. Investigation of the effects of solid lipid curcumin on cognition and mood in a healthy older population. J Psychopharmacol. 2015 May;29(5):642-51.

Better Curcumin

Curcumin is a good antioxidant, but it is especially effective in helping to reduce inflammation. For these reasons, curcumin provides many health benefits.

Read more…

How To Decrease Your Risk For Rotator Cuff Tear

Posted by on Arthritis, Inflammation, Pain | 0 comments

Shoulder pain is very common, and the rotator cuff muscles and tendons are often where the problem is located.

 

Tears of the rotator cuff also happen more often as we get older, but age in itself is not really the main reason.

As usual, our biochemistry is involved, and certain biochemical changes have been linked to rotator cuff tears.
This was investigated in the following study. Participants with rotator cuff tears and participants without any tendon problems were compared (Abboud JA, Kim JS, 2010).
In this research, it was found that total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL were higher, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were lower in the participants with rotator cuff tears compared to the participants without tendon problems.

If you want to reduce your risk for rotator cuff ruptures, it would make sense to adapt a diet and lifestyle which would accomplish that.

If you did that not only would you improve your odds for not developing a rotator cuff problem, but you would also reduce your risk for cardiovascular problems.

When you improve your biochemistry, you don’t only see improvement in one area, but several areas because the reasons for chronic problems tend to be the same.
This makes it a lot easier.
Hence, making changes to the way you eat is an effective way to improve your biochemistry.

Reference:

Abboud, J. A., & Kim, J. S. (2010). The Effect of Hypercholesterolemia on Rotator Cuff Disease. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research468(6), 1493–1497. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-009-1151-9


Learn to EatRecommendations that work. Foods that reduce rotator cuff tears. This is not a regular diet program.

Degenerative joint disease Osteoarthritis

Posted by on Arthritis, General Health | 0 comments


Another inflammatory driven condition

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. 80% of people over the age of 55 has been documented to have radiological evidence of joint degeneration (Stross JK, Bole GG, 1985).

Years ago the belief was that osteoarthritis was not an inflammatory disease, but only caused by wear and tear. There is however evidence now that inflammation also plays a role (Monibi F, et al. 2015).

Research has shown that the severity of pain increased as the inflammatory marker hs‐CRP increased in patients with osteoarthritis (Sturmer T, et al. 2004). Not only is inflammation playing a role, but free radical damage is also affecting the cartilage.

In this study patients with osteoarthritis had approximately a 4 fold lower level of extracellular SOD, the body’s own antioxidant enzymes (Regan E, Flannelly J, et al. 2005). When the blood glucose is too high, the glucose reacts with proteins causing glycosylated protein resulting in tissue damage.

As we get older glycation contributes to stiffer and more brittle cartilage (Verzijl N et al. 2000).

This is another reason why it is beneficial for you to eat low glycemic index, high nutrient food.

 

Learn to Eat:  Recommendations that work. This is not a regular diet program.

 

Monibi F, Roller BL, Stoker A, Garner B, Bal S, Cook JL. Identification of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers for Knee Osteoarthritis and Correlation with Radiographic Assessment. J Knee Surg. 2015 Apr 30.
Stross JK, Bole GG. Evaluation of an educational program for primary care practitioners, on the management of osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 1985 Jan;28(1):108-11. No abstract available.
Stürmer T, Brenner H, Koenig W, Günther KP. Severity and extent of osteoarthritis and low grade systemic inflammation as assessed by high sensitivity C reactive protein. Ann Rheum Dis. 2004 Feb;63(2):200-5.
Regan E1, Flannelly J, Bowler R, Tran K, Nicks M, Carbone BD, Glueck D, Heijnen H, Mason R, Crapo J. Extracellular superoxide dismutase and oxidant damage in osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Nov;52(11):3479-91.
Verzijl N, DeGroot J, Oldehinkel E, Bank RA, Thorpe SR, Baynes JW, Bayliss MT, Bijlsma JW, Lafeber FP, Tekoppele JM. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen. Biochem J. 2000 Sep 1;350 Pt 2:381-7.

 

 

Do you want to reduce your risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis?

Posted by on Anti-aging, Arthritis, High fructose corn syrup, Sugar, Sweet beverages | 0 comments

Fotolia,arthritisNo one, of course, wants to develop rheumatoid arthritis. You can reduce your risk to a large extent by making a small change to your habits by avoiding this item.
 

The reviewed research this is based upon was very large, and for that reason it is worth paying attention to.

Since the consumption of sugar sweetened soda has been associated with an increased risk for chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, the researchers investigated if it would play a role in developing rheumatoid arthritis (HuY, et al. 2014).

This study included women, and it was a follow up of 3,381,268 person-years.

 The results documented that the women consuming 1 or more servings of sugar sweetened soda per day had a 63 percent increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis compared with those who consumed no sugar sweetened soda, or less than 1 serving per month.

 

 

 

Hu Y, Costenbader KH, Gao X, Al-Daabil M, Sparks JA, Solomon DH, Hu FB, Karlson EW, Lu B. Sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;100(3):959-67. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086918. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

Easy way to improve bone density.

Posted by on Arthritis, Bone density, bone loss, Resveratrol, Supplements, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

osteoporosi 2Women are especially prone to bone loss after menopause, but men can also develop osteoporosis.

The reviewed research investigated bone loss in men with metabolic syndrome (Ornstrup MJ, et al. 2014). The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased low grade inflammation and an increased risk for osteoporosis.

The participants were given a daily dose of either 1000 mg of Resveratrol, 150 mg of Resveratrol or a placebo for 16 weeks. Assessments were done for changes in bone turnover markers and bone mineral density.

It was found that Resveratrol had a dose dependent, positive effect on bone by stimulating bone formation or mineralization. The higher dose of Resveratrol showed a significant change.

Because there are now ways to increase the bio-availability of Resveratrol, you don’t necessarily have to take such a high dose.

 

Resveratrol SC

Resveratrol SC Transparent

Resveratrol is found in the skin of grapes, but also in other various plants.

It is known as an antioxidant.

Resveratrol was found to stimulate SIRT-1, one of the longevity genes.

Some of the other changes also include improved insulin sensitivity, increased number of

mitochondria (the energy producing entity of the cell) and improved motor function (they moved better).

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Ornstrup MJ, Harsløf T, Kjær TN, Langdahl BL, Pedersen SB. Resveratrol Increases Bone Mineral Density and Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Obese Men: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.  Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Oct 16:jc20142799. [Epub ahead of print]

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Is systemic inflammation making your pain worse?

Posted by on Anti-aging, Arthritis, Eating, Exercise, Inflammation, Inflammation, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory factor, Tendonitis, The Learn to Eat Plan, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

Fotolia,painKnee pain is very common as we get older, and so is systemic inflammation, but what is systemic inflammation?
Systemic inflammation is the type of inflammation that you may not even know you have an issue with, because you don’t have to have a swollen joint. This type of inflammation is low grade, and it affects your whole body. It can, however, be measured by checking certain inflammatory markers.
The reviewed research investigated if there was an association between increased knee pain and systemic inflammation(Stannus OP et al. 2013). The participants were 149 men and women with an average age of 63 years. Knee pain was determined using an osteoarthritis pain questionnaire at the start of the study and then five years later. Radio graphs as well as MRI were used in the examination.
Several inflammatory markers were tested, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6).

The conclusion was that systemic inflammation is an independent predictor of worsening knee pain over 5 years. Adjustments for radio graphic osteoarthritis or structural abnormalities detected on the MRI did not make much difference regarding that association.

Does this mean that you can’t do anything about this?

No, you can do something about this, and I suggest you do, because systemic inflammation is also a risk factor for chronic disease.

Research has documented that the food you eat can be quite effective in reducing this type of inflammation.

This is one of the things you learn in “The Learn to Eat Plan“. You can read more about it here.

 
 
 
 
Stannus OP1, Jones G, Blizzard L, Cicuttini FM, Ding C. Associations between serum levels of inflammatory markers and change in knee pain over 5 years in older adults: a prospective cohort study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Apr;72(4):535-40. doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-201047. Epub 2012 May 12.