Your Road to Wellness

Alzheimer’s

Do you want a bigger brain and better memory?

Posted by on 7:33 am Alzheimer’s, Anti-Aging, Cognition, Dementia, Exercise, General Health, Memory, Research, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

 

Is it really possible to increase the size of the brain later in life?

Data from a randomized controlled study of 155 older women, who participated in 52 weeks of resistance training showed reduced cortical white matter atrophy on MRI scans when compared with the control  group (Best JR, et.al., 2015).

This means that they ended up with a bigger brain than they would have had if they had not done the resistance exercise.

Twice-weekly resistance training also promoted memory and increased peak muscle power when they were followed up after 2 years.

The control group did balance and toning.

If you instead prefer aerobic type of exercise, that may also improve your cognition.

Research showed that an individual’s cardio-respiratory fitness was a better predictor of cognitive gains than the exercise dose (Vidoni ED, et.al., 2015).

To improve cardio-respiratory function you can do regular aerobic exercise, or you can do high intensity short interval training which will save you time.

This study compared the effects of long slow distance training with high-intensity interval training in rowers (Ní Chéilleachair NJ, et.al., 2017).

High intensity short interval training was more effective than long and slow distance training in improving performance and aerobic characteristics.

References

Best JR, Chiu BK, Liang Hsu C, Nagamatsu LS, Liu-Ambrose T.Long-Term Effects of Resistance Exercise Training on Cognition and Brain Volume in Older Women: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2015 Nov;21(10):745-56.

Vidoni ED, Johnson DK, Morris JK, Van Sciver A, Greer CS, Billinger SA, Donnelly JE, Burns JM,Dose-Response of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition: A Community-Based, Pilot Randomized Controlled TrialPLoS One. 2015 Jul 9;10(7):e0131647.

Ní Chéilleachair NJ1,2, Harrison AJ2, Warrington GD,HIIT enhances endurance performance and aerobic characteristics more than high-volume training in trained rowers.J Sports Sci. 2017 Jun;35(11):1052-1058

 

Research has shown that sitting for a long time can be bad, but you don’t have to be active for very long to reap huge benefits.

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What factors are playing a role in Alzheimer’s, cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease?

Posted by on 9:58 pm Alzheimer’s, Eating, General Health, Get in shape, Health Risk, Heart disease, Stay healthy, Wellness | 0 comments

Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (Gamba P, et.al., 2015).

Levels of  oxysterols derived from cholesterol oxidation and inflammatory mediators have been found to be increased in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients (Testa G, et.al., 2016).

Oxysterols, the major component of oxidized LDL is responsible for the increase in endothelial stiffness and is a key step in atherosclerosis development (Shentu TP, et.al., 2012).

When 70 people with mild cognitive impairment were compared with 140 normal individuals, oxysterol levels were significantly higher in the people with mild cognitive impairment (Liu Q, et.al., 2016).

Where do we find oxidized cholesterol?

Oxidized cholesterol are commonly found in foods with high cholesterol content, such as meat, egg yolk and full fatdairy products (Savage GP, et.al., 2002).

Factors known to increase the production of free radicals and therefore oxidized cholesterol in foods are heat, light, radiation, oxygen, moisture and the storage of food at room temperature.

Processes, such as pre-cooking, freeze-drying, dehydration and irradiation, have all been reported to result in increased production of oxidized cholesterol in meats.

What can you do to reduce oxidized cholesterol?

The most obvious way to do it is to avoid the foods that contain the oxidized cholesterol.

The best way to do that is to eat plant based foods, since animal source protein is where you find oxidized cholesterol.

It would also be beneficial to take S-Acetyl Gutathione and Curcumin to reduce free radical damage and inflammation further.

References

Gamba P, Testa G, Gargiulo S, Staurenghi E, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G.Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Front Aging Neurosci. 2015 Jun 19;7:119.

Liu Q, An Y, Yu H, Lu Y, Feng L, Wang C, Xiao R.Relationship between oxysterols and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: a case-control study.Lipids Health Dis. 2016 Oct 10;15(1):177.

Savage GP1, Dutta PC, Rodriguez-Estrada MT, Cholesterol oxides: their occurrence and methods to prevent their generation in foods. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(1):72-8

Shentu TP, Singh DK, Oh MJ, Sun S, Sadaat L, Makino A, Mazzone T, Subbaiah PV, Cho M, Levitan I.The role of oxysterols in control of endothelial stiffness.J Lipid Res. 2012 Jul;53(7):1348-58.

Testa G, Staurenghi E, Zerbinati C, Gargiulo S, Iuliano L, Giaccone G, Fantò F, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G, Gamba P.Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer’s disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation.Redox Biol. 2016 Dec;10:24-33.

 

 

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This has Shown to Improve Memory, and it is Easy to Implement

Posted by on 11:26 am Alzheimer’s, Arthritis, Brain, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, General Health, Health, Inflammation, Memory | 0 comments

Image result for low grade inflammationLow grade inflammation, the type of inflammation you usually don’t know you have, is harmful for all tissue, including the brain. Curcumin found in the spice turmeric has been shown to decrease inflammation and was for that reason studied to determine if it could provide protection for the brain.

40 participants were given either curcumin in a bioavailable form twice daily or a placebo for 18 months (Small GW, et.al., 2018). The participants did not have dementia, and the researchers found that taking curcumin twice daily, improved their memory and attention.

PET scanning suggested that the improvements were associated with a decrease in amyloid and tau accumulation in brain areas regulating mood and memory. Image result for amyloid and tau alzheimers brain

Amyloid and tau accumulation are usually found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Earlier research with another bioavailable form of curcumin showed that 1 hour after taking the curcumin, the participants experienced significant improvement in attention and working memory (Cox KH, et.al., 2015).

Taking a capsule twice a day is very easy and something everybody can do.

References
Small GW1, Siddarth P2, Li Z2, Miller KJ2, Ercoli L2, Emerson ND2, Martinez J2, Wong KP2, Liu J2, Merrill DA2, Chen ST2, Henning SM2, Satyamurthy N2, Huang SC2, Heber D2, Barrio JR2. Memory and Brain Amyloid and Tau Effects of a Bioavailable Form of Curcumin in Non-Demented Adults: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 18-Month Trial. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Mar;26(3):266 277.

Cox KH1, Pipingas A1, Scholey AB2. Investigation of the effects of solid lipid curcumin on cognition and mood in a healthy older population. J Psychopharmacol. 2015 May;29(5):642-51.

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Is there a connection between Cardiovascular risk and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Posted by on 5:33 pm Alzheimer’s, Brain, Dementia, General Health | 0 comments

 

An increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease is linked to the presence of apoE4, a genetic factor, which is also strongly associated with developing atherosclerosis which increases the risk for Cardiovascular disease (Altman R, Rutledge JC, 2010).                                                                     

The authors of the same article state that cardiovascular risk factors, including elevated blood cholesterol and triglycerides, increase the likelihood of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

 

Researchers have also found that atherosclerosis causing obstruction of arteries at the base of the brain was more extensive in a group with Alzheimer’s disease when compared with a control group without dementia (Roher AE, et.al., 2011).

 

Arterial stiffness, atherosclerosis, endothelial degeneration and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier can induce several features of Alzheimer’s disease including atrophy of certain areas of the brain (Kalaria RN, et.al., 2012). The endothelium is the inner lining of the blood vessels.

 

 

There are also other risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, I will write more about that later.

 

Making changes to the way you eat is the most effective way to reduce cardiovascular risk, and you would most likely also reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia at the same time.  

When we correct the reasons for chronic conditions, we see an improvement in many areas, since the same reasons are involved in most chronic conditions.

 

 

References

Altman R, Rutledge JC. The vascular contribution to Alzheimer’s disease. Clin Sci (Lond). 2010 Aug 5;119(10):407-21.

Kalaria RN, Akinyemi R, Ihara M. Does vascular pathology contribute to Alzheimer changes? J Neurol Sci. 2012 Nov 15;322(1-2):141-7.

Roher AE, Tyas SL, Maarouf CL, Daugs ID, Kokjohn TA, Emmerling MR, Garami Z, Belohlavek M, Sabbagh MN, Sue LI, Beach TG. Intracranial atherosclerosis as a contributing factor to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Alzheimers Dement. 2011 Jul;7(4):436-44.

 

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