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Your Road to Wellness

Posts by Dr. Sopler

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

Posted by on 9:00 am Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Research, Stay healthy | 0 comments

 

How long does it take to reduce cardiovascular risk by changing what you eat?

 

 

This research was conducted to investigate the effect on cardiovascular risk factors using only
food (McDougall J, et.al., 2014).
1615 people participated in this research.
The protocol was implemented for only 7 days, and measurements of weight, blood pressure,
blood sugar, and blood lipids were measured at the start of the study and 7 days later.
The participants consumed a low-fat (≤10% of calories), high-carbohydrate (~80% of calories),
plant-based diet.
Most antihypertensive and antihyperglycemic medications were reduced or discontinued at the
beginning of the study.

 

 

After 7 days the average weight loss was 1.4 kg, total cholesterol decreased by an
average of 29 mg/dl, systolic blood pressure decreased on average by 18 mm Hg,
diastolic blood pressure by an average of 10 mm Hg, and blood glucose by an average of
11 mg/dL.

 

 

This was implementing a plant based vegan diet.
Most people think it will take quite a while to see changes on laboratory tests from dietary
changes, but as you can see, that is not the case at all. You just have to follow an effective
protocol.

Reference:

McDougall J1, Thomas LE, McDougall C, Moloney G, Saul B, Finnell JS, Richardson K,
Petersen KM. Effects of 7 days on an ad libitum low-fat vegan diet: the McDougall Program
cohort. Nutr J. 2014 Oct 14;13:99. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-13-99.

What is TMAO, and why should you avoid it?

Posted by on 9:00 am Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, Research | 0 comments

 

What is TMAO, and why should you avoid it?

 

The bacterial flora of the intestines convert choline into trimethylamine, which again is
converted into TMAO (trimethylamine-N-oxide) by the involvement of an enzyme from
the liver.

 

Choline is found in animal-derived products like eggs, dairy products, and meat.
The following study investigated the involvement of TMAO and major adverse cardiovascular
events (death, myocardial infarction, or stroke) during 3 years of follow-up in 4007 patients
(Tang WH, et.al., 2013).

 

 

The researchers found that increased plasma levels of TMAO were associated with an
increased risk of a major adverse cardiovascular event. An elevated TMAO level predicted an
increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events after adjustment for traditional risk
factors, as well as in lower-risk subgroups.

 

 

In other words, TMAO is an additional cardiovascular risk factor many are not aware of.
This research documents that TMAO triggers inflammation and is involved in the process of
forming atherosclerosis (Seldin MM, et.al., 2016).
The bacterial flora of people eating animal-derived products is producing TMAO, vegans and
vegetarians don’t produce much, because they have a different bacterial flora of the intestinal
tract (Koeth RA, et.al., 2019).

 

References:

Koeth RA, Lam-Galvez BR, Kirsop J, Wang Z, Levison BS, Gu X, Copeland MF, Bartlett D,
Cody DB, Dai HJ, Culley MK, Li XS, Fu X, Wu Y, Li L, DiDonato JA, Tang WHW, Garcia-Garcia
JC, Hazen SL. l-Carnitine in omnivorous diets induces an atherogenic gut microbial pathway in
humans. J Clin Invest. 2019 Jan 2;129(1):373-387.

Seldin MM, Meng Y, Qi H, Zhu W, Wang Z, Hazen SL, Lusis AJ, Shih DM. Trimethylamine
N-Oxide Promotes Vascular Inflammation Through Signaling of Mitogen-Activated Protein
Kinase and Nuclear Factor-κB. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Feb 22;5(2). pii: e002767.

Senthong V, Li XS, Hudec T, Coughlin J, Wu Y, Levison B, Wang Z, Hazen SL, Tang
WH. Plasma Trimethylamine N-Oxide, a Gut Microbe-Generated Phosphatidylcholine Metabolite,
Is Associated With Atherosclerotic Burden. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Jun 7;67(22):2620-8.

Can certain foods increase your risk for advanced prostate cancer?

Posted by on 8:06 am Cancer, cancer risk, Health Risk, Prostate cancer, Tissue Recovery Blog | 0 comments

 

Can certain foods increase your risk for advanced prostate cancer?

 

Avoid these foods if you have a prostate. It’s a good idea even if you don’t have a prostate.

Can certain foods increase your risk for advanced prostate cancer?

According to this research, it can. The researchers examined total, unprocessed, and processed red meat, poultry, and eggs in relation to the risk of lethal prostate cancer (Richman EL, et al., 2011).

 

 

They started following 27,607 men without cancer from 1994 to 2008 who developed distant organ metastases (it spread to other parts of the body), and men who died from prostate cancer during the follow-up. This is what the researchers found.

Men who consumed 2.5 or more eggs per week had an 81% increased risk of lethal prostate cancer compared with men who consumed less than 0.5 an egg per week.

 

 

It was also found suggestive, but not statistically significant, positive associations between poultry 3.5 servings or more compared to 1.5 servings or less per week, and processed red meat 3 or more servings a week compared to 0.5 serving or less per week. The following study is also interesting.

The researchers examined whether dietary choline or choline-containing compounds increased the risk of lethal prostate cancer (Richman EL, et.al., 2012). These men were followed for 22 years.

 

 

47,896 men were included in the study, and they found that the highest quintile choline intake was associated with an increased risk of lethal prostate cancer.

Where do we find high amounts of choline? You may have guessed it, especially in eggs.

We do need choline since the body doesn’t produce enough, but we can get adequate amounts from plant-based food.

 

References:

Richman EL, Kenfield SA, Stampfer MJ, Giovannucci EL, Chan JM.Egg, red meat, and poultry intake and risk of lethal prostate cancer in the prostate-specific antigen-era: incidence and survival.Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2011 Dec;4(12):2110-21.

Richman EL, Kenfield SA, Stampfer MJ, Giovannucci EL, Zeisel SH, Willett WC, Chan JM.Choline intake and risk of lethal prostate cancer: incidence and survival.Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;96(4):855-63.

This antioxidant is lower in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Posted by on 8:32 am Alzheimer’s, Antioxidents, Brain, Dementia, Depression, Nervous System | 0 comments

 

This antioxidant is lower in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

 

There are good reasons why the body produces its own antioxidant enzymes.

All tissues including the nervous system and the brain are exposed to free radical damage.

The most important antioxidant the body is making is probably glutathione.

Humans with neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders have demonstrated altered levels of glutathione and oxidized glutathione (Gu F, et.al., 2015).  A decreased ratio of glutathione to oxidized glutathione has been found in the blood and brain of these individuals.

 

 

Glutathione depletion can lead to abnormalities of mitochondrial function where the cells make energy. A few studies have shown that a glutathione deficiency occurs prior to neuropathological abnormalities.

These researchers found that glutathione was significantly decreased in the red blood cells from male patients with Alzheimer’s disease (Liu H, et.al., 2004).

 

 

The most common form of glutathione is reduced glutathione, but don’t take that. This form of glutathione is oxidised in the stomach and does not provide much benefits.

S-acetyl glutathione on the other hand gets into the cells where it’s needed (Cacciatore I, et al., 2010).

 

References:

Cacciatore I, Cornacchia C, Pinnen F, Mollica A, Di Stefano A.Prodrug approach for increasing cellular glutathione levels.Molecules. 2010 Mar 3;15(3):1242-64.

Gu F, Chauhan V, Chauhan A.Glutathione redox imbalance in brain disorders.Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2015 Jan;18(1):89-95.

Liu H, Wang H, Shenvi S, Hagen TM, Liu RM.Glutathione metabolism during aging and in Alzheimer disease.Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Jun;1019:346-9.

 

Effective S-Acetyl Glutathione

  • Glutathione is your primary defense against aging.
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What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low fat diet?

Posted by on 8:31 am Body fat, Diet, Eating, General Health, Health, Health Risk, The Learn to Eat Plan | 0 comments

 

 

What works best to keep cardiovascular risk factors low, a high-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet or a high carbohydrate low-fat diet?

 

Research has compared these different approaches a while back, and we have had the results for a while. The reason why they’re still are questions about the best approach is probably that there are many ways to lose weight, and especially a high-fat diet also called a ketogenic diet has been promoted as a solution to almost everything including weight loss.

What did the research show when it comes to cardiovascular risk?

The participants of this study completed each 4-week diet intervention with a 4 week washout period between each approach (Miller M, et.al., 2009).

 

 

 

Food records were analyzed, fasting blood samples, and brachial artery reactivity testing was performed. During the Mediterranean and the high carbohydrate, low-fat diets maintenance phase, there were significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL).

For the Mediterranean diet the LDL decreased 11.8%, and for the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet the LDL decreased by 16.6%.

The LDL increased on the high-fat diet.

CRP, an inflammatory marker decreased the most on the high carbohydrate, low-fat diet and increased on the high-fat diet.

 

 

Brachial artery testing revealed an inverse correlation between flow-mediated vasodilatation and intake of saturated fat. This means decreased vasodilation with increased fat intake.

The science does not back up the promoted benefits of a high-fat diet.

According to the research, a high-fat diet increases cardiovascular risk.

It is, however, important to remember that not all carbohydrates are equal.

Avoid processed high glycemic index carbohydrates, and increase the intake of plant-based food.

 

 

Reference:

Miller M1, Beach V, Sorkin JD, Mangano C, Dobmeier C, Novacic D, Rhyne J, Vogel RA. Comparative effects of three popular diets on lipids, endothelial function, and C-reactive protein during weight maintenance.J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Apr;109(4):713-7.

Learn to eat program

  • How and why different foods affect you
  • How to put together meals that will produce the results you’re looking for
  • How to lose weight effortlessly by eating the foods your body needs
  • How to gain muscle and improve sports performance.
  • How to reduce inflammation and pain
  • How to stabilize your moods so you feel happier
  • How to lower cholesterol and triglycerides