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Your Road to Wellness

Posts by Dr. Sopler

This mineral can influence muscle strength, be sure you get enough of it!

Posted by on 9:15 am BMJ Formula, General Health, General Health, Intensity Training, Joint health, magnesium, Muscles, Supplements | 0 comments

This mineral can influence muscle strength, be sure you get enough of it!

 

 

We lose minerals when we perspire. Hot weather and exercise will for that reason make us lose
more.

Some minerals are also more important than others. Magnesium is one of the most important
ones and many people don’t get enough of it.

Magnesium is involved in energy metabolism and numerous enzymatic reactions.

 

 

Athletes often don’t get enough magnesium to compensate for what they lose. This study investigated the impact magnesium can have on muscle strength in elite male
basketball, handball, and volleyball players (Santos DA, et. al, 2011).

It was found that the intake of magnesium was directly associated with maximal isometric
trunk flexion, rotation, and handgrip strength.

Magnesium does not only work for athletes.
The following research included 1138 men and women with an average age of 66.7 years
(Dominguez LJ, et.al., 2006).

The participants were evaluated by testing grip strength, lower-leg muscle power, knee
extension torque, and ankle extension isometric strength.

The researchers found that blood levels of magnesium were significantly associated with
muscle strength and performance as evaluated with the above tests.

 

strength

 

Magnesium in the form of an amino acid chelate is a good choice since it is both well tolerated
and better absorbed than the more common form of magnesium oxide which can cause GI
irritation.

References:

Dominguez LJ, Barbagallo M, Lauretani F, Bandinelli S, Bos A, Corsi AM, Simonsick EM,
Ferrucci L. Magnesium and muscle performance in older persons: the InCHIANTI study. Am J
Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):419-26.
Santos DA, Matias CN, Monteiro CP, Silva AM, Rocha PM, Minderico CS, Bettencourt Sardinha
L, Laires MJ. Magnesium intake is associated with strength performance in elite basketball,
handball and volleyball players. Magnes Res. 2011 Dec;24(4):215-9.

 

BMJ

 

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BMJ Bones, Muscles, and Joints

 

 

 

 

The neurovascular system, oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. What can you do to protect yourself?

Posted by on 7:31 am Alzheimer’s, Cardiovascular Disease, Dementia, Nervous System | 0 comments

oxidative stress

 

It is very important to have a good blood supply to every tissue in the body.  All tissues, but especially the brain, depending on the good blood supply to function properly.  This is most important for the brain because it has a very high energy demand.

Neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels communicate with each other to regulate cerebral blood flow.

This study gathered information on the importance of oxidative stress as it relates to vascular changes observed in brain aging and neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s (Carvalho C, Moreira PI, 2018).

One of the emerging causative factors associated with Alzheimer’s pathology is oxidative stress.  This Alzheimer’s-related increase in oxidative stress has been attributed to decreased levels of the brain antioxidant, glutathione (Saharan S, Mandal PK, 2014).

Glutathione protects cells against oxidative stress, and protecting brain endothelial cells under oxidative stress is key to treating cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (Song J, et.al., 2014).  The endothelium is the inner layer of the blood vessel wall.

The body makes glutathione, but it is making less as we get older, and that’s when we need more.

We can, however, take glutathione orally.   Regularly reduced glutathione which is the most common form you will find for sale is not very bioavailable, most of it is oxidized in the stomach and is not going to provide much protection.

You can instead take S-Acetyl Glutathione which gets into the cells and provides very valuable protection from free radical damage.

 

References:

Carvalho C, Moreira PI, Oxidative Stress: A Major Player in Cerebrovascular Alterations Associated to Neurodegenerative Events.Front Physiol. 2018 Jul 3;9:806.

Saharan S, Mandal PK. The emerging role of glutathione in Alzheimer’s disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;40(3):519-29.

Song J, Kang SM, Lee WT, Park KA, Lee KM, Lee JE.Glutathione protects brain endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress by increasing nrf2 expression.Exp Neurobiol. 2014 Mar;23(1):93-103. 

 

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Effective S-Acetyl Glutathione

Can being exposed to heat help your memory, and reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Posted by on 9:00 am Alzheimer’s, Cardiovascular Disease, Dementia | 0 comments

 

If you follow us regularly you saw that the stress of high heat as in sauna use provided protection against cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease and memory disorders share some of the same risk factors. Does that mean sauna use would provide some protection from Alzheimer’s disease as well? The following research investigated just that.

 

 

2,315 apparently healthy men aged 42-60 years at the start of the study, were followed for an
average of 20.7 years (LaukkanenT, et al., 2017). Of these men, 204 ended up being diagnosed with dementia and 123 were diagnosed with
Alzheimer’s disease. 4-7 sauna bathing sessions per week were found to be associated with lowered risks of
dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. This was the same frequency of sauna use that helped prevent death from cardiovascular
disease. Sauna baths also make you very relaxed afterward. Give it a try.

 

Reference:
Laukkanen T, Kunutsor S, Kauhanen J, Laukkanen JA, Sauna bathing is inversely associated
with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in middle-aged Finnish men. Age Ageing. 2017 Mar
1;46(2):245-249.

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Oxidised cholesterol and Alzheimer’s disease

Posted by on 6:46 am Alzheimer’s, Cholesterol | 0 comments

 

Increasing evidence is now supporting the hypothesis that oxidized cholesterol is the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease and oxysterols, which are the oxidized form of cholesterol, are the link connecting the disease to altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain and to high cholesterol; this is because of the ability of oxysterols, unlike cholesterol, to cross the blood brain barrier (Gamba, et.al., 2015).

 

 

Oxidative stress is associated with neuroinflammation, and a vicious circle has been found to connect oxidative stress and inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Analysis of published data shows that the levels of cholesterol are increased in people with mild cognitive impairment,  and 24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are elevated in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment compared to controls (Wang, et.al., 2016).

24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are types of oxysterols.

The following research found that study participants with mild cognitive impairment had significantly higher levels of 27-hydroxycholesterol when compared to participants with normal cognition (Liu Q, et.al., 2016).

It may look like taking statin drugs to lower cholesterol could be a solution to prevent memory loss later in life, but that does not work.

 

In this study the authors concluded that there is good evidence that statins given in late life to people at risk of vascular disease do not prevent cognitive decline or dementia (McGuinness B, et.al., 2016).

 

Dietary changes are a better choice.

 

This research indicated that adherence to the meditranean diet was associated with better cognitive performance and lower dementia rates (Anastasiou CA, et.al., 2017).

 

References:

 

Anastasiou CA, Yannakoulia M, Kosmidis MH, Dardiotis E, Hadjigeorgiou GM, Sakka P, Arampatzi X, Bougea A, Labropoulos I, Scarmeas N, Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet.PLoS One. 2017 Aug 1;12(8):e0182048.

 

Gamba P, Testa G, Gargiulo S, Staurenghi E, Poli G, Leonarduzzi G.Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease.Front Aging Neurosci. 2015 Jun 19;7:119. 

 

Liu Q, An Y, Yu H, Lu Y, Feng L, Wang C, Xiao R.Relationship between oxysterols and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: a case-control study.Lipids Health Dis. 2016 Oct 10;15(1):177.

 

McGuinness B1, Craig D, Bullock R, Passmore P.Statins for the prevention of dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Jan 4;(1):CD003160.

Wang HL, Wang YY, Liu XG, Kuo SH, Liu N, Song QY, Wang MW.Cholesterol, 24-Hydroxycholesterol, and 27-Hydroxycholesterol as Surrogate Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Meta-Analysis.J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;51(1):45-55.

 

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Decrease your blood pressure by adding one good tasting item to your normal meals

Posted by on 4:22 pm Blood Pressure | 0 comments

It’s important to keep the blood pressure low as we get older. High blood pressure especially
increases the risk for stroke.Postmenopausal women often develop hypertension and arterial stiffness. For that reason the
following research included postmenopausal women who had started to experience increased
blood pressure (Johnson SA, et.al., 2015).
Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated and arterial stiffness was assessed at the
start of the study and at the end. This was an 8-week, randomised double-blind
placebo-controlled trial. The participants received either 22 g of freeze-dried blueberry powder
or 22 g of control powder.

After 8 weeks, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group
that took the blueberry powder, and arterial stiffness had also improved.

Nitric oxide levels improved significantly in the blueberry group whereas there were no changes
in Nitric oxide levels in the placebo group. Nitric oxide relaxes the muscles in the blood vessels
and improves blood circulation.
This may be the reason blueberries lowered the blood pressure.
Eating blueberries every day is a good idea. If it is difficult to find fresh ones, you can usually
find frozen blueberries.

Reference:
Johnson SA, Figueroa A, Navaei N, Wong A, Kalfon R, Ormsbee LT, Feresin RG, Elam ML,
Hooshmand S, Payton ME, Arjmandi BH.
Daily blueberry consumption improves blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal
women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled
clinical trial.J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015 Mar;115(3):369-77.

 

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